What is one tangible way that you plan to exhibit Hebraic leadership in your own neighborhood after taking this course? - Pathfinder

What is one tangible way that you plan to exhibit Hebraic leadership in your own neighborhood after taking this course?

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    • #1601
      pathfinderlms
      Keymaster

      What is one tangible way that you plan to exhibit Hebraic leadership in your own neighborhood after taking this course?

    • #2510
      Joe Alvarez
      Participant

      After taking this course one thing I kinda forgot is that we as Christians are not to walk alone. We must find a church and do so as a group as we walk in faith and tell others about the gospel. I just recently joined a church that I was watching livestreams online from and decided to go to a service this past weekend. I’m definitely going back for another service and hopefully more. I just want to lead people to Christ and His kingdom by sharing the gospel to them with truth but also compassion while keeping God at the center of everything. People say I’m humble as well so that will definitely help as I talk to others about the gospel. For the longest I didn’t even know what my purpose was in life until recently, even though I always believed in God and was telling people about Jesus. Took me a while but now I know I meant to save souls so that can get into the Kingdom.

      • #3385
        Kacie Marks
        Participant

        Hi Joe, thank you for sharing this. I agree that the unity of believers is so important. Jesus prayed the night before his crucifixion that all believers would be united as one in John 17. I am also encouraged to pursue deeper relationships with believers as we walk on the same path towards the Kingdom. Have a great day!

      • #3437
        Anna Selzer
        Participant

        Hey Joe! I think being part of a church community is so important, especially in today’s social media-based world. It’s easy to think that attending church online or studying the Bible by yourself is the equivalent of attending and being involved in church in person, which is not the case. There’s no substitute for finding your purpose serving in God’s house! Wishing you well with the church you’re attending now!

    • #2529
      Katherine Zehnder
      Participant

      I plan to exhibit Hebraic Leadership in my own community by maintaining a mindset that I am always learning. I really enjoyed this course on leadership, and I hope I can become a better leader because of it. I want to help my community by volunteering, in ways that benefit the community. One thing I have been doing is volunteering at a local ranch that ministers to kids that come from broken homes. I plan to continue doing this as well as finding other ways to benefit my community. Furthermore, I also want to maintain the mindset of always learning and keeping an open mind, I want to continually learn about other cultures and religions and understand them in a better way. I also plan to stay close to the baseline, by intentionally, fasting, praying or doing other things which will “simulate suffering” in order to achieve clarity in my own life.

      • #2645
        Mitchell Schwab
        Participant

        Katherine,

        What you are doing at the local ranch is admirable to say the least! Life is so tough on kids in our day even for those who do not hail from “broken homes.” However, for those who do come from difficult backgrounds, life seems like it is mere bombardment and never joyful. One thing about this perspective of Hebraic Leadership that fascinates me is that life is expected to be a bombardment of trials and tests. I’ve come to realize that those who endure the most difficult of circumstances are often those with the most pure spirits with unbelievable leadership traits. Your willingness to help them, spend time with them, and love them will help them recognize their true potential. Well done, Katherine. Keep doing your best in your community. The butterfly effect is a real thing and it will pay massive dividends in their lives.

      • #2775
        Christian Brehmer
        Participant

        That is awesome Katherine! That is a great way to represent the Hebraic leadership in your neighborhood. I will be praying for your community that you volunteer in as you represent the Kingdom. That’s also great that you want to maintain an open mindset with others. So often that’s how we can become true neighbors to others, by learning about their cultures and religions.

    • #2643
      Mitchell Schwab
      Participant

      The same thought has been recurring in my mind throughout this course — the Christian youth. They are bombarded daily by the digital world, counter-Christianity movements, and atheistic worldviews. I’m currently a lawyer, a regional youth leader in my church, charter school board chairperson, and the head basketball coach at the local public high school. This course has caused me to reflect on my current leadership roles and how to exhibit Hebraic leadership in each of my responsibilities. As far as applying this to my neighborhood, I have a strong desire to develop an interfaith leadership coalition for Christian Youth. I envision working with local pastors to develop a local leadership program that will prepare young men and women for life’s challenges, especially in this digital age. I hope to partner with Passages to send the youth on a trip to Israel as a capstone to the leadership program. I firmly believe there is no better time than now to unite the Christian community behind the global cause of Christ. The Philos Project seems to be ahead of the game. This course was fantastic.

      • #2658
        Christiana Gellert
        Participant

        Thank you for that ministry, @Mitchell! I attended public schools and lacked responses to the anti-Christian indoctrination I received in my classes and from my classmates. At that time, social media was just starting to become common among teens, and we were starting to engage heavily with it without any ideas of the dangers (or opportunities for evangelization). However, a couple of my teachers (especially in extra-curricular activities!) were bravely open about their Christian faith, and the values they instilled in me were highly instrumental in my desire to delve deeper into my faith later in life.

      • #2840
        Sean Moore
        Participant

        Hi Christiana. I work in a public high school as a career counselor, and it really is interesting how many at the school are so closed minded to a non-secular way of thinking, much less an Abrahamic way. I had a very good conversation with a staff member the other day just talking about my private school, about how it was religious based, and why my parents did not want me to go to public school. It was very interesting that the teacher could not comprehend even teaching the classes from a biblical way, and outright said that should be outlawed. Very eye opening.

      • #3234
        Karen Ramirez
        Participant

        Wow everything you said is so true!I myself am only 24 and I’ve been working in youth ministry since I was 15 and it hasn’t been an easy road, what our youth face today goes against everything they believe and forces them to walk away from their faith. As a leader especially when it comes to youth I feel like we need to be so much more well informed, to be able to teach and preach to our young people if we really want to see a change. This course definitely gives us necessary tools to equip ourselves!

    • #2668
      Kenneth C. Jackson
      Participant

      There are so many best and tangible ways that I plan to exhibit Hebraic leadership in my neighborhood after the completion of this course. However, I will share one practical tangible way: The one tangible way I will be exhibiting this leadership is by leading by life-style. I strongly believe that practicing what I will be learning and also sharing it with others is core to me and my ministry. In my culture, I mean my neighborhood (home or workplace), life-style living draws people to God more than quoting John 3:16. In fact, there are many of my neighbors who just need me to talk to them. Indeed, they need me to smile with them, and share time with them. This is why I am not taking this training lightly. With the knowledge, understanding, wisdom, and relationship with God from this training, it will draw my neighbors from far and near closer to a table where they can taste and see the goodness of God through me from this training. In short, this leadership training is not about me but the thousands of neighbors in my neighborhood

    • #2709
      Conner Brew
      Participant

      I currently work at a local church as the Director of Development, responsible for ensuring that everyone in our church has access to the offerings that meet their needs and cultivate an atmosphere of discipleship. I also run a local community development nonprofit, where we work hard to connect the church directly to the people and communities of our city to provide necessary services, supplies, and support. I have always felt that an essential trait of leadership is taking someone somewhere they couldn’t get to on their own: leading them. The Hebraic principles of the Pathfinder leadership program nestle very nicely into that philosophy – to seek the Kingdom first (Matt 6) and to take my church and my community with me is my ultimate leadership goal. I want to work harder to approach my community with an eye on its deity, personality, history, plurality, and a sense of responsibility. Conducting ministry in Charlottesville, VA, tensions are nearly always high – we have a storied history of racial conflict, economic conflict, and spiritual conflict. The role of the church, and the Christian leader, is to plant itself like a tree by water in the midst of this crisis and lead toward the Kingdom. I plan to engage my city with that eye, to seek the Kingdom through service and coercive leadership, and to grow in my own faith while working to disciple others around me.

    • #2712
      Brynn Schwartz
      Participant

      After completing the initial course work I have realized there are many ways I can use my current skills and interests to lead in my community. I have been involved with a local organization that works with the foster care system locally and I want to step out and recruit my young friends (church community and others) to get involved as well. It’s a beautiful way to serve the “orphan and the widow” even when you don’t have the capacity to take anyone in yourself. I am also involved in the local arts through my pottery work. I’m excited to do local markets and use that as an opportunity to give back to the community as well as stretch myself. I would also love to combine my two current passions and create a program for inner city kids to have an opportunity to create art. Using your hands to create something reminds you of the effort and thought that went into your own creation, and I can’t wait to let children in my community experience that revelation in a tangible way.

      • #3206
        Samuel Lowry
        Participant

        Hey Brynn! Awesome desire to serve the foster care system. I served alongside a couple whose calling was care specifically for children in foster care going through the rough transitions. even though I don’t serve specifically foster care children or the system itself, I do have the awesome opportunity to serve alongside an organization working really hard to help complex (divided, blended, mixed, etc.) families thrive; ensuring the focus is on the development of the children and not the separation or divorce of the parents. Their program is called One Heart, Two Homes. – Samuel

      • #3438
        Anna Selzer
        Participant

        Hi Brynn! The foster care system is an area with so much need so it’s great that you’re stepping out to help with that! I would love to see your pottery as well, that’s super cool:) I think your idea to create an art program would be a great outlet for kids to discover their own passions and talents in a new way. Pottery is such an awesome metaphor of our own creation!

    • #2720
      Carlos Vargas
      Participant

      This course is the beginning of a journey. We have been given gifts and using them correctly is the key. Our community is growing and using my gift to help others to connect with God and their community is what I want to get more involved in. help others so we together can change our community.

    • #2773
      Christian Brehmer
      Participant

      For the past few months, I have been praying throughout the day, “Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done in earth, as it is in heaven.” It has brought me great peace when struck with the news of injustice or faced with complex policy challenges at work. Since completing this course, I have found volunteer opportunities to help those in need. The Hebraic mindset reminds me I can be an active agent on earth and not sit idly by. I will be participating in feeding the poor in my community with peers at my work, and connecting more with my local church’s volunteer opportunities.

      • #3207
        Samuel Lowry
        Participant

        Hi Christian. “Active Agent on Earth” – love this! what a reminder that we were not created to just lay away and watch Netflix all day long, but that we have been given a unique calling (destiny) by God to do something specific to further His Kingdom. I’m excited for you that you have this conviction and will be using your time to service the poor and get in touch with your local church. I know every church needs more volunteers. Just ask the Kids Ministry at mine. LOL Have an awesome week! – Samuel

    • #2838
      Sean Moore
      Participant

      In my current job, I am an administrator in education. While I use to hate the idea of the bureaucracy when I was younger, I now find myself as a small part in that larger cog. I can control in small ways who gets scholarships, which professors get promoted, and what types of employers we have visit the college. The last chapter of pathfinder was my favorite, as I have always wondered what does the Bible find to be ethical when it comes to biblical use of pollical power. So, how can I apply this lesson. There were several takeaways from my reading of Abraham. He is fair, conciliatory, but also firm when he needs to be with Lot. He compromised, even though he had the larger family and could have taken it with the sword. This is a practice that I need more of in my life, but also something America could learn from. Too many times in modern America, we hear that we “cannot compromise” with Americans who are different then us. It is a lesson we have forgotten, and if we continue to never give any ground it could lead to terrible results.

      • #2866
        Victoria Franklin
        Participant

        Hi Sean,
        Your comment on compromise and politics here in America really resonated with me. Oftentimes we take a “My way or the highway” approach here and you’re 100% right– it leads to not so great results. In the Bible we see the examples of leaders who were strong but also conciliatory. I think this is because of the importance of possessing humility in Hebraic leadership. Without humility there would be no good accomplished.

      • #2914
        Miriam Cavanaugh
        Participant

        Hi Victoria,
        Your comment about how important humility is to a good leader resonated with me. I keep having the words of the great author C.S. Lewis in my mind “Humility is not thinking less of yourself but thinking of yourself less!” A good leader needs to be free of his own ego in order to be thinking of the good of the other people entrusted to his care. Without the virtue of humility power cannot be exercised justly but will always be directed towards my own advantage.

      • #3194
        Emmanuel Berrelleza
        Participant

        Hi Sean, thank you so much for sharing about your experiences as an education administrator. I found it incredibly insightful and introspective on your end about your newfound relationship with bureaucracy. I agree that when we are young, we lack a lot of perspective necessary to understanding the world around us. Your takeaways from the lessons on Abraham have given me a new lens through which I now view compromise and what it means to do so in modern times.

    • #2881
      Austin Pellizzer
      Participant

      After taking this course, there are many ways in which I plan on integrating this course into my everyday life. One of them is constantly connecting with the Hebraic map’s personality pillar. As a young professional working in the world of Jewish student life and Israeli education, the idea that ‘Humans are also relational’ in the sphere of community and belonging is something I will strive to connect with daily. The need to find meaning, connectivity and belonging in the land of Israel is a critical part of making young adults see purpose in their work. As a result, I plan on using this method to inspire and make people realize how important community and leadership are to reconnecting with their roots in the land of Israel and, as a whole, the Near East.

      • #3236
        Karen Ramirez
        Participant

        Great point Austin and what your planning on doing sounds amazing, and honestly we need more of it! In my circle I’ve found a deep disconnect between christians and Israel, there is no sense of brotherhood and it truly worries me. No one ever spoke to me or mentioned Israel to me growing up and I grew up in church my whole life, the only time it was mentioned was was when we read it in the bible. I believe we need to bring more awareness to the importance of community and being united as the body of christ, that includes our brothers and sisters overseas.

    • #2906

      The most proficient way to lead or evangelize in biblical settings is to live an exemplary life that can be seen and understood. In Matthew 5:16, Jesus made mention of Christians shining their light (character) to may attract others to God’s Kingdom. So in my neighborhood, the first step is to be example of what I preach, thereby letting others know that what am asking of them is possible.

    • #2907
      Miriam Cavanaugh
      Participant

      I consider my family as my first neighbours that I have the duty and the pleasure to minister to. As a mother, it is indispensable to be a leader to my son, to teach him to seek first and foremost God and his kingdom and to exercise a virtuous life. One way to do this is to be leading by a good example, to take responsibility, to show him what patience, love and self-control mean. Like a stone is forming waves when it is thrown in water, my life is pulsating out of my own relationship with God and my engagement in my family. This vibrant center thus results in my active involvement in my catholic parish, where I recently founded a group of married couples to create fellowship and meaningful input and conversation. I also am part of the music ministry to help to evangelise the world through the beauty of songs. An even broader engagement that has been on my heart for a while is teaching German or English to refugees from Arabic-speaking countries who seek to learn the language of their new country. Having invested a many years and a good amount of work in a university degree of Arabic I feel now more than ever enabled to welcome and teach Arabic-speakers in their own language.

    • #2924
      Nomsa C Mmakola
      Participant

      One tangible way I plan to exhibit Hebraic leadership in my neighborhood is by serving God, and to serve God is by helping his children, our brothers and sisters, through tithing to build God’s Kingdom on earth and a generous offerings. Participate in Virtual Mass every Sunday, begin each day with Morning Prayer or meditation, read bible verses during Regular Nature walks, Participate in small Group Bible study sessions, Serve God through your family, Volunteer in your community, Home and Visiting Teaching, Donate clothing and other Goods, Be a friend, and Share the Gift of Reading.
      This course has opened my mindset of thinking, associating, and Leading in God kingdom.

    • #3041
      Loncey Elie
      Participant

      One important quality in Hebraic leadership that stood out to me is that it is not individualistic, but collective. I value this because in my experiences as a leader I believe that it is not all about you, it is bigger than you. I began to realize that what I do is not all about me, but it is about the impact that I make on the people around me by spreading the message about the kingdom of God. In my neighborhood, I have led by example in the way I conduct myself and also being a part of a tennis team effort to help the individuals in my community improve on their levels has served as a testimony about the importance of teamwork to make things happen. Several people and I have served our community since we have a strong passion for tennis and for four years I have been able to realize the strong love and growth we experience to elevate to a new level. What matters the most is our happiness and the inspiration we have for others in the small and big ways to enhance the kingdom of God.

      • #3047
        Tanner Hauck
        Participant

        Hey Loncey – great to hear from you and definitely agree with the sentiment about collectivism. The impact that you make on the people around you leads them to create impact and that initial seed of action grows exponentially which is what I think is so great about being a part of something bigger than yourself. I also respect you serving your community through your passion, taking something that you’re already involved in and skilled at and finding a way to use it for the betterment of the community is really admirable – kudos to you!

      • #3193
        Emmanuel Berrelleza
        Participant

        Hi Loncey, thank you so much for sharing an insightful take on your perspective of Hebraic leadership. I particularly enjoyed reading about the collective nature of Hebraic leadership. In the United States, we have a culture of individualism that can sometimes get in the way of building community. I agree the working toward a just society requires a collective effort, and I am so glad to know that others such as yourself feel the same way and are working towards that goal.

      • #3220
        Sarah Valdez
        Participant

        Loncey, this is really amazing and I believe you are on to something. It is true that we can not do it alone and I believe God meant for us to have community. It is so much bigger than us, you and I. It is about Him, to glorify Him in all that we do. I love that you are doing things practically to be involved in your neighborhood. Very inspiring to see you what to do things that allow you to see the bigger picture.

      • #3293
        Victoria Coronado
        Participant

        Loncey,
        Thanks for sharing! I agree with your statement. A major element of Hebraic leadership is the aspect of community and our role within. I think as a society, we fail to see this because we are taught to be independent and praised for it. Not only that, but we are encouraged to look out for ourselves and make all of our choices based on what will benefit the self before we consider how it will effect those around us. It is important to integrate the practice of collective thinking because so much of biblical command is collective. We are meant to work together within a community. It is expected and commanded of us. We weren’t made to do life on our own and we must be aware that our decisions effect our community.

    • #3046
      Tanner Hauck
      Participant

      What is one tangible way that you plan to exhibit Hebraic leadership in your own neighborhood after taking this course?

      One tangible way that I plan to exhibit Hebraic leadership in my own neighborhood after taking this course is infusing intentionality into my daily interactions. Being present and engaged with the grocery clerk, the server at Sunday brunch, the eye doctor’s scheduling assistant. I think by treating each engagement with intentionality you’re able to better understand and connect with those in your community. I think beyond taking the time and effort to connect with people in my dozens of quick daily interactions I’m going to look into way I can assist with my local YoungLife chapter. I attended YoungLife all throughout high school and served as a leader for a semester in college. Now that I’ve graduated college and watch my younger brother go to YoungLife I’m reminded of the foundation that community provided for me. I’m still friends with many of the former leaders and will reach out to see if there’s a way for me to re-engage with that local community.

    • #3192
      Emmanuel Berrelleza
      Participant

      After taking this course, one tangible way I intend to exhibit Hebraic leadership in my own community is by continuing to serve as an education advocate with local leadership in Las Vegas. My interpretation of Hebraic leadership involves a fundamental understanding of what it means to be inclusive and why it is important. Inclusivity is important for Christians to embody because God’s word is intended for people from all walks of life. From a public policy standpoint, this also necessarily involves keeping in mind the various narratives that exist in our community to create an equitable society. This course taught me that leadership is essential to provide order in the chaos and clarity in the confusion. I feel better equipped to undertake this task through my leadership roles as a Speech and Debate coach at my prior Title I high school. I enjoy my time working with our nation’s youth and look forward to embodying these lessons into my everyday life.

    • #3198
      David Ndayishimiye
      Participant

      As a non-profit organization employer, I’ve understood many things when it comes to different cultures and so on. Through this, I’ve had the opportunity to meet people with different backgrounds, mindsets, and social statuses. As stated in this section, churches/people have forgotten the real calling. The Kingdom’s message has been interpreted wrong. Furthermore, the world is changing every day, whether we contribute or not. However, I’ve understood that we should be a part of the change but with the intent of bringing positive changes through following the Hebraic leadership lessons. After consuming this valuable knowledge, the first step will be to correct all structures that do not align with what we are being thought.

    • #3201
      David Ndayishimiye
      Participant

      I will work with neighboring churches to encourage collaboration and unity. Most churches today are divided. Collaboration has decreased. It seems like we have forgotten the Kingdom values. We need to bring back the right message and mend what has been broken.

    • #3205
      Samuel Lowry
      Participant

      After taking this course I feel conflicted to respond in 2 ways, regarding how I engage my community, more so in my own neighborhood. First, I need to be more intentional about building the “community” within my neighborhood. Even though I feel very blessed to be in the neighborhood I am in, I do not really “know” my neighbors. I only know my next door neighbor, and that’s because they are an older couple always outside cleaning their front porch. A Hebraic Leader understands that we were meant to be in community and in connection with one another. If it does not exist, I need to be a part of the solution to create it.

      A Hebraic Leader also expects and affirms the diversity of beliefs and ways of life. As I work to build the community, I need to remember to first lead with love, and guard my heart from beliefs that may be completely contrary to my own. I need to respect them, listen to them, and make them feel loved. When we first establish a connection of mutual respect then we can can easily share what are beliefs are, in hopes of establishing a seed for them to come to know Christ.

    • #3219
      Sarah Valdez
      Participant

      I plan to really dig deeper into what the word says about loving my neighbor. I think of myself as a people person, I love building relationships with people and in that I get to be a conduit of His love. But after being introduced to the Hebraic Leadership topic, I want to go even deeper. What it means to be a Godly leader in today’s world is so different than in bible times yet the Word of God is alive and active. I believe I can pull from the Scriptures and lean on the wisdom of the Holy Spirit to help me address any circumstance that may be in front of me. Something practical that I want to work on is studying the bible, not just to have devotions but to truly learn about the history and discover some of the revelations that God wants to share with me.

    • #3225

      I believe that one of the things that causes the most damage to our community is the lack of knowledge of such important issues that have repercussions in the world society.

      I believe that after having received this course, my job is to build a multiplier effect, to be able to share the information with my community, starting with my family, congregational and professional environment. Many people create their own criteria and conclusions on this subject, but it is necessary to provide them with clear and reliable information.

    • #3226

      I believe that one of the things that causes the most damage to our community is the lack of knowledge of such important issues that have repercussions in the world society.

      I believe that after having received this course, my job is to build a multiplier effect, to be able to share the information with my community, starting with my family, congregational and professional environment. Many people create their own criteria and conclusions on this subject, but it is necessary to provide them with clear and reliable information.

    • #3233
      Karen Ramirez
      Participant

      For me personally this course and Hebraic leadership is something that has impacted me in a personal level but also in a ministerial level. As a youth leader and a teacher I can use what I’ve learned to influence others and use the Hebraic map as a guide to instruct young christians to live by these principles. I am also part of a foundation, and as a core member I think if my views and ideas are rooted from a hebraic leader stand point it can help influence the decisions we make. The RI Wellness foundation was made to serve the community and it was put in the heart of my pastors to start this non-profit and I believe having someone from the board with this understand it and teach it to other members can influence how we approach our programs but also in leading people to Christ. I really think This course taught me things I had never really scrutinized before as a christian but is fundamental not only to my faith but to the people around me as I teach and lead others.

    • #3266
      Stevin Surajin
      Participant

      I wish to exhibit Hebraic leadership by reaching out to young men that I know and the youth in my local church, and disciple them and teach them how to be better men based on not what the world says, but instead what is reflected in scripture. Young men these days are bombarded from all avenues on how to best exhibit/develop their masculinity. There is a lot of unclear/unbiblical advice that is touted regularly whether through social media, worldly influences, their friend circle and even unfortunately their own family. A lot of men end up following some of these wrong examples leading to deeply destructive behaviors that can affect themselves, as well as those around them. For example, promiscuity, alcoholism, and activities that can cultivate pride (Exercise, work, etc. which are not bad by themselves, but can ultimately foster excessive pride when an individual chooses to pursue that as their primary motivation) instead of prioritizing a relationship with Jesus. This was a path that I would have followed, if not for being discipled and mentored by Christian men who are strong in their faith. It was recently that I got this revelation, and I am slowly embarking upon this process by reaching out to the youth in my church and other men within my friend circle, who I feel that the Lord is directing me towards, to see how I can pour into their lives, and build them up to be men that don’t adhere to worldly standards, but rather to a biblical one.

    • #3278
      Karis Sutherland
      Participant

      There are multiple elements of Hebraic leadership that I hope to continue to live out in my daily life. One of the key elements mentioned is involvement in the local church. I hope to continue putting this into practice by remaining faithful to weekly church services, teaching in the children’s ministry, serving in the music ministry, and staying involved in my church’s young professionals group.
      Another key element of Hebraic leadership is embracing politics as a gift from God. I plan to continue to put this in action by serving on the board of my local political organization. As a board member, I encourage young professionals to get involved in local politics; call government leaders about issues that concern me as a Christian; and, as community service chair, organize opportunities for members to serve in our city (such as donating items for a foster care resource center and delivering cards to nursing home residents). Through ministry in my church and involvement in local politics, I hope to serve God by faithfully practicing Hebraic leadership right here in my community.

    • #3394
      Kenneth Saye
      Participant

      After reading this course, I understood that as a leader of Christ, you are not limited only to churches. But you are called by God, to be of help to your communities’ schools, workplaces, individuals, marketplaces, families, country, and the world at large through an impartation of Christ both spiritually and physically.
      Doing my freshman year at the university, I understood that leader helps management to achieve their goals, by using managerial resources and people accomplishment. I believe that using the Hebraic visions, is a biblical principle that will help us move forward in a spiritual and physical relationship with God.
      I understand, when you are called to lead, you are for everyone; which concord with the Hebrew word that says Linhog, meaning to conduct others as a leader. A leader is also, a servant, motivator, and team worker. Looking at Moses, when he was designated by God to lead the children of Israel from Egypt into the wilderness to cross the red sea before they have gotten to the promise land, which was the place of their final destination shows the miraculous power of God. What God cannot do, does not exist?

    • #3398
      Kenneth Saye
      Participant

      After reading this course, I understand that as a leader of Christ, you are not only limited to churches.
      But you are called by God, to be a help to your communities’ Schools, Workplaces, individuals, marketplaces’ Families, and the world at large through an impartation of Christ both spiritually and physically.
      Doing my freshman year at the university, I understood that leader help management to achieve their goals, by using managerial resources and people accomplishment.
      I believe that using the hebraic visions, is a biblical principle that will help us move forward in spiritual and physical relationship with God.
      I understand when you are called to lead, you are for everyone, which concord with the Hebrew word that says Linhog, meaning to conduct others as a leader.
      A leader is also, a servant, motivator, and term worker.
      Looking at Moses, when he was designated by God to lead the children of Israel from Egypt into the wilderness to cross the red sea before they have gotten to the promise land, shows the miraculous power of God. What God cannot do, does not exist?

    • #3424
      Layne Peters
      Participant

      One tangible way that I plan to exhibit Hebraic leadership in my own neighborhood after taking this course is by looking for opportunities to add intentionality into my daily interactions. One of the fundamental ideas to be a Hebraic leader is to love the neighbor that crosses my path. Living that out and calling those around me to live that out in my neighborhood, job, and as I go is how I will exert my time. I want to employ the pillar of plurality of not forcing others to hold my view but simply showing Jesus through my words and actions in the opportunities of conversation and acts of service in my neighborhood. Thankfully, my job is community development and ministry in my neighborhood, so I do not have to go far in order to put these ideals into practice weather that be offering heathly relationships to kids and families around me, meeting needs and providing resources even when it’s not easy or the best time for me. But also going out of my way to live sacrificially with my time and money to help care and show who Jesus is by how he is calling me to be and act.

    • #3436
      Anna Selzer
      Participant

      After taking this course, I plan to exhibit Hebraic leadership through continuing to view the Christian faith through its original Near Eastern lens. In today’s day and age, it’s easy to become enthralled in a more westernized version of Christianity while losing sight of its roots. While making our faith applicable to today is important, it is also invaluable to consider its original context and origins. I believe that his can be demonstrated in my own life through more historically based study of the Bible, which in turn will allow me to share that information with others. Often today I think it is popular to consider the Near East as a far off and removed place, rather than as the birthplace of Christianity and civilization itself.

    • #3469

      After this course, it becomes more evident that the Hebrew leadership is not committed to just one way of resolving conflicts. First, it is necessary to understand how we got to the current situation so that we can think about which paths we will take. I have been working as a teacher and pastoral assistant in Brazil and recent political events have revealed that our society could benefit greatly if this vision were better cultivated in our churches and schools. I intend to be more intentional about using what I learned on the course with my students and in teaching moments at church.

    • #2511
      Joe Alvarez
      Participant

      Amen! I love that part too because it’s true. You definitely don’t need a title or anything to be a leader. A true leader will lead regardless of their title because they know what is needed to lead people to Christ. Loving one another and helping them out is exactly what a leader does. I have a powerful testimony that will help lead people to Christ’s Kingdom as well so I love that part when you said you wanted to use your voice. I do believe when people can relate to what you’ve been through and why you decided to follow Jesus will lead them to the Kingdom.

    • #2512
      Joe Alvarez
      Participant

      You definitely don’t have to have a certain title or be someone who has earned the right to be a leader, so I’m happy to see that you know you can do so right where you’re at. Also you’re already a leader if you think about it because you have students. Now you just need to take that and use it to lead others to Christ and His Kingdom. You got this Felipe I believe in you!

    • #2530
      Katherine Zehnder
      Participant

      Hi Madeline,

      I really enjoyed your post! I also think it is cool that you live in Nashville. One of my friends graduated from pathfinder, work in the pro-Israel space and is moving to Nashville in a few months.

      I agree that being a Hebraic leader looks like getting involved in your community and church. As I said in my post, one thing that I do is volunteer at a local ranch that minister to kids from broken families.

    • #2531
      Katherine Zehnder
      Participant

      Hi Jacque,

      I really enjoyed your post! I agree that Hebraic leadership looks like being visible and accessible on days other than regularly scheduled days of worship, we need to be available to support and mentor people.
      As I said in my post, one thing that I do is volunteer at a local ranch that minister to kids from broken families. I can’t just show up when I feel like it, I have people counting on me.

    • #2535
      Christina Sturgeon
      Participant

      Hi Jacque! You’ve identified a hurt/ache and it brings me joy to know you’re trying to fill that void and be a balm in Louisville, KY. In seeking the welfare of the city, I pray others come to know the richness of community–esp one founded in God–and that everyone down here will not truly be satisfied until the return of the King. In college, I managed an art room at a local church that catered to a lot of Greenville, SC’s homeless population. There I learned the simplicity of working alongside and listening. At first I was self conscious of my background/what I had vs. what they didn’t, but that was hardly an obstacle because they just wanted to be truly seen as multi-faceted humans instead of just being passed by/seen as someone who just needs help. I think especially in the creative sphere, we tap into an often-neglected facet of who we’ve been made to be in God’s image: creators. More than just you, I’d be stoked to see how your Church body can help embrace their neighbors. God’s got this!

    • #2575
      Christina Sturgeon
      Participant

      Congrats on your journey to DC; I hope you find what you’re looking for. I’ve grown up in and around DC and, while it has a reputation for housing some power-hungry people, I think you’ll also be pleasantly surprised by folks here who strive because of their love of God. It’s such a transient city, but with each new arrival, there’s a breath of something “else” that’s added to the mixing bowl. Some churches in the area do a good job at investing in the community around them, although diving deep within the church congregation is good and necessary, too. I’m always struck by Jeremiah’s words (29:5-7) and its implications. I think we don’t initially plan to “hunker down” when we see we’re in exile; usually it’s a “flee to the next good option…anything is better than this” mentality. But we’re to settle down—to “plant gardens and eat what they produce.” That garden image is sweet; we’re to stick around to see and reap from our hard labor and patience. It’s not about the timing of things, but the quality of things that can/do/will happen within this/these exile period(s).

    • #3279
      Karis Sutherland
      Participant

      Max, I don’t live in DC, but am active in politics. It’s so encouraging to hear you mention how you plan to prioritize loving your neighbors, serving in church, and making a difference through the gospel, over attaining political power. We certainly need more Hebraic leaders in national and local politics!

    • #3295
      Katherine Lopez
      Participant

      Yes! I lived in DC and VA for 1 year and I find it encouraging to see how the Lord puts His sons and daughters in places of favor. Places of high positions in the political world. I believe the Lord is extremely strategic and intentional with eveHe plans and does. He is relational. Even though I don’t know much about politics aI can for sure tell you that there’s sons and daughters in strategical places of DC and all the DMV placed in places of high authority interceding for the nation and the whole world. People of all over the globe come as one before our Father. That is beautiful. I hope you have a great time in the place the Lord has opened for you with a divine intention. You can also get connected with believers and be part of the intercession. Revival starts with us. We are revivalists

    • #2644
      Mitchell Schwab
      Participant

      Hi Heather,

      I enjoyed reading your post. I also feel strongly that interfaith events is an important step for any Christian. There are so many churches with so many perspectives. Whenever I seek to understand and empathize with others, I begin to understand more about who God is, why Jesus did what he did, and why he loves us. It also strengthens my own understanding and testimony of Christ. I also like your emphasis on our need for community. Isn’t it interesting how the Lord mentions repeatedly in the Old Testament that he will “gather” His people in the last days? Gathering indicates the importance for us to be unified in one body of Christ. The more we come together as Christians, the more power we’ll have.

    • #3045
      Tanner Hauck
      Participant

      Hey Heather,

      I really enjoyed your response and think you are spot on with wanting to be a leader in your own community before attempting the same in a disconnected community. I think this insight speaks to the power of community as you hint at – engaging with the people around you strengthens your understanding of an area, it’s people, and ultimately it’s culture (and the complex problems it’s unique culture holds). I think, maybe less explicitly, engaging in one’s own community teaches an individual how to engage others which is an important step when attempting to lead in an unfamiliar environment.

      Best, Tanner

    • #2672
      Evan Crain
      Participant

      I was drawn to the impact of the city of D.C. on the nation and the world in the past and present (and naturally, imagining my role in the future!), first interning on the Hill and eventually moving here. Many Hebraic leaders (whether they used the term or not), or as the Pathfinder course put it “enlightened deists,” over time have created a remarkable system of justice and order through God’s grace. I find their leadership and their reliance on God for wisdom in the use of power fantastic examples, and I really enjoy the examples of explicit dependence on God scattered throughout D.C. The Museum of the Bible flight simulator – while somewhat nauseating – features numerous examples of where to find these.

    • #2713
      Brynn Schwartz
      Participant

      Haley! I loved reading your response to this question. It rings so true in my own life and I think we as believers to often overlook the “small” moments in search of something more big and profound. The beauty is Yahweh works most often on our hearts through the small, intimate connections. So encouraging to hear you’re being intentional in Washington DC. It will be exciting to see the impact of someone slowing down to notice the small moments.

    • #2710
      Conner Brew
      Participant

      Monique, this is a fantastic way to demonstrate seekership of the Kingdom. By walking with Jim more intentionally and purposefully, you can gain a deeper sense of responsibility for your neighbors and your neighborhood. I would challenge you, in addition to walking with Jim who is already a Christian, to seek out ways to work amidst the spiritual warfare of your community – where in your community is Christian leadership desperately needed? Where is a deeper sense of hebraic worldview critical to solving a problem that your community faces, and how can you walk in that crisis to lead your community to the Kingdom?

    • #3280
      Karis Sutherland
      Participant

      Hi Monique,
      I love the practical idea of checking on your neighbor Jim as a way to live out the gospel and serve your community. I’m sorry to hear about your other neighbors. I would encourage you to continue to show the love of Christ to them, assuming it doesn’t put you in danger physically or otherwise. My pastor preached from the Sermon on the Mount today, and I was reminded how incredibly hard it is to “turn the other cheek” when others wrong us, and how desperately we as Hebraic leaders need the power of the Holy Spirit.

    • #2711
      Conner Brew
      Participant

      Steve, I really love the way your response addresses multiple aspects of the Hebraic map and worldview. By acknowledging the differences and the diversity in your community, you become very well-poised to approach crisis leadership in your community with a mindset of deity, personality, history, plurality, and responsibility. Recognizing that different people and communities come from different perspectives borne of unique histories and experiences, you position yourself to more effectively listen, understand, and communicate across the landscape of your community and lead it therefore toward the Kingdom of God.

    • #2714
      Brynn Schwartz
      Participant

      Cristina! Thank you so much for taking time to write this response. It spoke to me and just confirmed things I’ve been feeling recently. We need to be willing to slow down and notice those around us. Jesus was never in a hurry and that’s what enabled Him to minister effectively. Continue to love your family well and pray that when opportunities arise you would have wisdom to know what to do and how to step out! Continue being faithful.

    • #3096
      Loncey Elie
      Participant

      Hey Cristina! I really appreciated the perspective you elaborated on in regard to what seeking the kingdom of God is. I loved how you were able to state that spreading the kingdom of God is not only futuristic, but it also happens to the way we act to people around us in our personal lives. I admire this way of thinking because the saying that the little things we do everyday makes a big difference is fully demonstrated here . Everyday we should strive to be ourselves unapologetically and do what we need in our lives naturally. It is not merely our words, but it is our actions that demonstrate who we are and touches other people’s lives in various forms to understand what the Kingdom of God is.

    • #2774
      Christian Brehmer
      Participant

      Hans, that is awesome to hear! Will keep you in prayers as you work with refugee communities from the Near East and Eastern Africa. Yes, what a beautiful vision in Isaiah 19. I will be praying specifically Isaiah 19:22 “They will turn to the Lord, and he will respond to their pleas and heal them.”

    • #2875
      Joshua Johnson
      Participant

      Dear Hans, this experience sounds fascinating. I love that these rich cultures are coming from all over these regions to Portugal and are hearing about and learning about the God of Israel, and coming to know Jesus personally! Syria, Iran, Sudan, that must be so amazing to hear their stories and the cultures they come from. I imagine that some of the languages they speak are rare and precious languages. I’m just curious, does anyone speak Neo-Aramaic dialects? (I have been exploring some of those dialects.) And that is fascinating they are coming to Portugal. Is there a particular program or government policy that brings them there?

      Either way, I would love to hear from you if possible, as I am fascinated by all things Middle East, especially language and culture, and hopefully I will have the change to hear about your work as well!

    • #2839
      Sean Moore
      Participant

      Hi Katie!

      I have no seen you since our undergrad at Regent. Hope you are well. Community involvement is huge! There was a extended family unit very important in most of the old testament, but you also had your church and town. Some of these have become lost in America, but their importance continues to be needed in our society.

    • #2867
      Joseph Doherty
      Participant

      Thank you for the window into your experience and ministry in New York. Culture contributes significantly to the understanding of ourselves and our relationship with our faith. There are ways in which contemporary culture can support the faith, but it is important to not allow the faith to be reduced to culture. Our faith is universal and while cultural components are included in worship, our manner of life should be derived primarily from faith and secondarily from culture. On a different note, I agree that days for disconnecting from technology or “desert days” are very helpful to refocus on the priority of our relationships in Jesus Christ.

    • #2876
      Joshua Johnson
      Participant

      Dear Tina, I am reminded of a Bible study I led about ten years ago, and I had a young man from an Asian nation. He really loved to hear about Jesus and study the gospels with us, but I was saddened by the fact that he was being held back by one particular notion: he was concerned that if embraced Christ and Christianity, he would have to give up his ancestors. I am not sure how large a role ancestor worship played, but it seemed to be something holding him back. I wish I had the wisdom to explain that he was not really giving up, he was gaining something new and so much better, and that he could still honor his ancestors in the sense of honor your father and mother and respecting one’s heritage. I hope that he found a way through that conflict, but it was a sad moment to see something like that be a stumbling block.
      I also have a humorous anecdote. When we were studying the Gospel of John, and John the Baptist declares of Jesus, “Behold, the lamb of God!” the student asked, “Did he take on the avatar of a lamb, or something like that?” I will never forget that, it brings a smile to my face.

    • #2868
      Joseph Doherty
      Participant

      Hi Heather, you draw out an excellent point regarding seeing the personhood of those around us. There first must be a friendship or some level of trust and respect prior heavier conversations which listeners might find challenging. We must first establish our own credibility. I am reminded of 1 Peter 3:15 “Always be ready to give an explanation to anyone who asks you for a reason for your hope, but do it with gentleness and reverence, keeping your conscience clear, so that, when you are maligned, those who defame your good conduct in Christ may themselves be put to shame.”
      Also, great work, Carrie, in being an ambassador for Christ on your campus!

    • #2986
      Sarah Victor
      Participant

      Yes I think who we are is so important to leadership: growing healthily and being a light from the inside out should be our goals. To your point about temporal-minded behaviors, this could apply not just to relationships and mentoring contexts but also to building the necessary skills and knowledge base to effectively make decisions in the longer term. The goal shouldn’t be publicity but when we build and promote a healthy culture, change automatically follows.

    • #3054
      Donna Molloy
      Participant

      My work in a civic ministry really embodies what was taught in the introduction course. The idea that we are first called to the kingdom and without that basic understanding through the Old Testament the New Testament really does not make sense. My job is to bring back the basic Hebraic understanding for leaders to then engage in the world through ministries, through politics, through culture. Also that political leadership is just a gift that not all possess and some may be called to something different is one that I stress in my work. Modern America Christianity calls for with one extremely or the other but the first Christians found balance and it’s something I really took away from the teachings. America will not save the world but in order to keep sharing the gospel us as leaders need to preserve freedom we have and advocate for that same freedoms else where. Also I think that is something the founders called for as well.

    • #3097
      Loncey Elie
      Participant

      Hey Carrie ! I appreciated your profound understanding of what a neighbor is and how to demonstrate our love to them. So often in our society we believe that our neighbor is someone who lives next door to us. In reality, it is the people who are around us and/or are part of our lives that is considered our neighbor. This is powerful because it shows that everyone deserves the love that Jesus Christ demonstrated to us. I loved Carrie how you explained that in order or us to show who God is and the love He has, we have to be educated about the historical aspect in an unbiased manner knowing the past, present, and future. This new wisdom that you elaborated on Carrie has been very useful in the way I will portray who I am to the people around me so they are able to understand who God is.

    • #3199
      David Ndayishimiye
      Participant

      Hi Dan,
      I strongly admire your calling. Throughout my life, I’ve tried to spread the gospel as much as I can. When it came to preaching to people with different religions, it was a bit difficult because of the lack of understanding of my own belief. Although I have grown more and still learning, I think that the task that you have chosen to do is the right step and you are heading in the right direction. You will realize how much you’ve improved once you complete it.

    • #3269
      Stevin Surajin
      Participant

      Dan,

      I can truly understand and even respect your desire to share the Gospel with your Arab/Muslim neighbors. I live in a neighborhood, that has a high population of immigrants, and while I am focused on sharing the Gospel with all people who have not heard the Good News, I feel that one of the things that the Lord has called me to do is to share the Gospel within my neighborhood as well. Being an immigrant myself, I do understand some of the nuances in culture, and I am focused on building relationships and friendships with my neighbors many of whom are non-believers despite any barriers to language or culture. One thing that I’ve learned is that the Holy Spirit is especially instrumental in providing discernment in understanding any issues or difficulties my neighbors may be facing, as well as the best ways to support them as well. Thank you for what you are doing, it is deeply encouraging to hear from other Gospel sharers and church planters!

    • #3200
      David Ndayishimiye
      Participant

      Hi Bianca,
      I agree with your perspective. great transformations have begun in places as such. I also have the same thoughts and would love to make a difference in my neighborhood before anywhere else. I also agree that we have many churches but we rarely work together. I think that we have mixed things up. Collaboration should have been our first priority but it isn’t. This comes to show how little we know about the kingdom and its values.

    • #3221
      Sarah Valdez
      Participant

      Donna, thank you for your thoughts on this course. I have worked in politics and totally understand the fight between what is right and what is wrong. Somehow the world has a hard time finding the Truth but makes it very easy to make a truth that they can call their own. I believe you are correct when you say the founders would have called for this as well, it is important to remember that seeing the world with a biblical worldview is fundamental to an individuals growth in our society.

    • #3271
      Stevin Surajin
      Participant

      While I myself am not interested in politics, and have not been involved in it, it is reassuring to see that despite DC’s reputation as a place to broker power, there are still people and churches that are deeply involved in their walk with the Lord. It is also good to know of the positive impact that this can have upon future residents, many of whom are pursuing a career in politics, to know that their lives will be impacted positively by Jesus, which will hopefully bring about a new stable of policy/law makers that are solid Christians.

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