What is one tangible way that you plan to exhibit Hebraic leadership in your own neighborhood after taking this course? - Pathfinder

What is one tangible way that you plan to exhibit Hebraic leadership in your own neighborhood after taking this course?

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    • #1601
      pathfinderlms
      Keymaster

      What is one tangible way that you plan to exhibit Hebraic leadership in your own neighborhood after taking this course?

    • #1978
      Mirembe janet
      Participant

      Am proud and thankful to God that am from Uganda,a land where there’s freedom of worship. Pathfinder has rounded my faith deep in the rocks that I can stand firm to defend the truth. Slot I never knew as a Christian who just renewed her journey with Christ and with the thirst of the true word,here I found. Many religions and beliefs here that need to know the truth. Am thankful that i have been sharing this with our congregation moreso audios and many youths gaining. Some want to enroll soon. I tend to be Gods mouthpiece of the truth that I know it with no fear,being the right ful leader who stands on right decisions. And with basics of Christianity,the world needs to know in depth.how am previllaged to know about Israel and it’s practices in line with Christianity! Time to spread the truth to nations. Thanks to Jesus

      • #3054
        Donna Molloy
        Participant

        My work in a civic ministry really embodies what was taught in the introduction course. The idea that we are first called to the kingdom and without that basic understanding through the Old Testament the New Testament really does not make sense. My job is to bring back the basic Hebraic understanding for leaders to then engage in the world through ministries, through politics, through culture. Also that political leadership is just a gift that not all possess and some may be called to something different is one that I stress in my work. Modern America Christianity calls for with one extremely or the other but the first Christians found balance and it’s something I really took away from the teachings. America will not save the world but in order to keep sharing the gospel us as leaders need to preserve freedom we have and advocate for that same freedoms else where. Also I think that is something the founders called for as well.

    • #1988
      Tina Joji
      Participant

      Living in the great state of New York, I think there are a plethora of ways I can exhibit Hebraic leadership skills in my community and surroundings. I am part of a South Asian Evangelical church community where a lot of our faith is also outlined by the nuances of our heritage and culture. We align wholly on Biblical truths, but often there is additional pressure placed on the up and coming youths to simultaneously appease the strict Indian culture. With this pressure, the ultimate goal of a practicing Believer can often be confused. Youths in the church may practice dressing modestly to appease the strict “culture” rather than choosing to find the importance of modesty derived by Biblical outlines. When I took these courses, I re-realized the importance of keeping your sights on the bigger picture. Culture and family do play important roles in ones’ faith, but centering the goal of leading your loved ones to Christ’s Kingdom should take precedence. Being heavily involved in my parish, I acknowledge that youths look up to me as a leader in many ways. It is pertinent that I accept that calling and correctly lead as we were taught through these audios. One tangible way I plan on exhibiting Hebraic Leadership in my neighborhood is revisiting the realm of digital reliance in our current world. I will aim to teach the power of disconnecting, even if it is for 1 day per week, so that we can learn to rely on Christ-like sources that do not necessarily involve utilizing a digital screen. I am excited to further learn what the Philos Project recommends in terms of attempting to digitally disconnect, and I look forward to implementing some positive changes within the church youth groups that I currently lead now.

      • #2867
        Joseph Doherty
        Participant

        Thank you for the window into your experience and ministry in New York. Culture contributes significantly to the understanding of ourselves and our relationship with our faith. There are ways in which contemporary culture can support the faith, but it is important to not allow the faith to be reduced to culture. Our faith is universal and while cultural components are included in worship, our manner of life should be derived primarily from faith and secondarily from culture. On a different note, I agree that days for disconnecting from technology or “desert days” are very helpful to refocus on the priority of our relationships in Jesus Christ.

      • #2876
        Joshua Johnson
        Participant

        Dear Tina, I am reminded of a Bible study I led about ten years ago, and I had a young man from an Asian nation. He really loved to hear about Jesus and study the gospels with us, but I was saddened by the fact that he was being held back by one particular notion: he was concerned that if embraced Christ and Christianity, he would have to give up his ancestors. I am not sure how large a role ancestor worship played, but it seemed to be something holding him back. I wish I had the wisdom to explain that he was not really giving up, he was gaining something new and so much better, and that he could still honor his ancestors in the sense of honor your father and mother and respecting one’s heritage. I hope that he found a way through that conflict, but it was a sad moment to see something like that be a stumbling block.
        I also have a humorous anecdote. When we were studying the Gospel of John, and John the Baptist declares of Jesus, “Behold, the lamb of God!” the student asked, “Did he take on the avatar of a lamb, or something like that?” I will never forget that, it brings a smile to my face.

    • #2015
      Cristina Varela
      Participant

      The question posed brought my mind to a quote from Saint Teresa of Calcutta, “If you want to change the world, go home and love your family”.

      Far too often, I think we focus on what we could be doing a thousand miles away instead of what you can immediately be doing to serve the Kingdom in your own neighborhood.

      Like it or not, we are leading by example at all moments in our life. The “in-between period” is just as significant as the larger events in our lives as both provide opportunity to show others the face of Christ.

      God may not have called each and every one of us to a profession focused upon ministry, but regardless of vocation he has called us each and every one of us to serve our parishes, families, and communities on a daily basis.

      For this stage in my life, that is being a good daughter and sister to my family, and devoting as much time and treasure as I am able to my community.

      • #2257
        Mitchell Hailstone
        Participant

        Cristina, your comment is much appreciated. As a husband and father of two children, I’ve had to grapple with choosing between what I thought was “important” work and a good paying job with comfortable work-life balance that allows me resources and time to a play a more active, leading role in the life of my family. As someone who’s ultimately chosen the latter, I see the fruit of that decision bear out at home every day and look forward to seeing how my relationship with my kids mature as they grow older.

      • #2273
        Gia Chacon
        Participant

        Hi Cristina, the Mother Teresa quote you used is one of my favorites from her! Christianity is a call to action. Far too often, we think of that “action” only being meaningful if it’s in far off places. However, sometimes the people who are most unreached are those right within the walls of our homes, schools, and places of work.

        Jesus said in John 13:35, “By this everyone will know that you are my disciples, if you love one another.” The most simple yet profound evidence of the Christian is the love they show. It is easy to forget how much our families and communities are in need of that love.

        Blessings!

      • #2714
        Brynn Schwartz
        Participant

        Cristina! Thank you so much for taking time to write this response. It spoke to me and just confirmed things I’ve been feeling recently. We need to be willing to slow down and notice those around us. Jesus was never in a hurry and that’s what enabled Him to minister effectively. Continue to love your family well and pray that when opportunities arise you would have wisdom to know what to do and how to step out! Continue being faithful.

    • #2041
      Carrie Coffman
      Participant

      As a current college student on a secular campus, I have the opportunity to reach those who do not know Christ in a defining season of their lives. Utilizing the idea of Hebraic leadership to accomplish this goal is a critical piece to drawing others nearer to Jesus. One of my favorite points discussed in this course was the idea of the Hebraic leader being someone who thinks historically, knowing both what has happened and what is ultimately to come. This level of zoomed-out thinking reminds us to put our day to day lives into the Gospel story. In addition, for a Hebraic leader to be most effective, they must be seeking “the honor of God and the benefit of their neighbor.” My neighbors are not merely my Christ-centered friendships or those in my ministry. Each student on my campus and person in my community is someone I can love as a neighbor. Tangibly, I can live each day actively remembering my role as a Christ follower and representative – living to draw others closer to Him, not push them away.

      • #2090
        Heather Lopez
        Participant

        Hi Carrie! I really appreciated your post, especially your statement that “Each student on my campus and person in my community is someone I can love as a neighbor.” I think it’s really easy to view our community with blinders on, only focusing on building relationships with our Christian neighbors, and viewing our non-Christian neighbors as people to convert rather than people to love and minister to, regardless of their beliefs. I’m not saying that we shouldn’t try to have conversations with our non-believing friends about Christianity, but it’s so important to see them first as a person rather than as their belief system.

      • #2868
        Joseph Doherty
        Participant

        Hi Heather, you draw out an excellent point regarding seeing the personhood of those around us. There first must be a friendship or some level of trust and respect prior heavier conversations which listeners might find challenging. We must first establish our own credibility. I am reminded of 1 Peter 3:15 “Always be ready to give an explanation to anyone who asks you for a reason for your hope, but do it with gentleness and reverence, keeping your conscience clear, so that, when you are maligned, those who defame your good conduct in Christ may themselves be put to shame.”
        Also, great work, Carrie, in being an ambassador for Christ on your campus!

    • #2057
      Zack Jones
      Participant

      My neighborhood is Capitol Hill and my neighbors are those, like myself, who work on Capitol Hill. Drawing from the Hebraic worldview, I understand that God has placed me to work in Congress and has given me a chance to influence political policy and communications coming out of Washington, D.C. I am tempted to think that there is often little I can do because I’m working within a system, but Robert’s lectures reminded me that I must not forget the influence that the Lord has given me and the power over history that I have. Particularly, as a speechwriter, the things I write contribute to the national discourse. I can exhibit Hebraic leadership through my writing, by displaying a worldview that is respectful of plurality and use’s the Bible and the Hebraic worldview as the foundational narrative for my my writing. Incorporating those themes, themes such as a future hope. Similarly, I can urge my fellow Christian hill staffers to use their influence for goodness and righteousness and remind them that they’ve been granted political influence to steward for the good of others.

      • #2256
        Mitchell Hailstone
        Participant

        As a former Hill communications staffer myself, I appreciate this note from you Zach. It is difficult to remember that our work can play a part in God’s redemption story. But, I think there’s a special obligation for communicators to use words precisely and effectively. Perhaps the policy you’re writing about isn’t going to make a huge difference, or the political effort behind it is doomed to fail. But practicing communicating clearly and precisely is an important skill that God can use in a variety of ways.

      • #2335
        Monique Leach
        Participant

        I find your post humbling becauwe I currently have problems with those in my neighborhood because I’m a Christian and they are not. I often feel isolated and harassed and “picked on”, and I don’t always respond in a “Christ-honoring” way. In fact, most of the time I respond with anger. If not outwardly, then in my heart. Everywhere I look in my neighborhood, there is evil, wickedness, and ungodliness. “It makes me angry, but even more, it makes me “tired and sad”. I am a victim of something many people are not aware of known as “Gangstalking”. It is when members of the United States Government hire “rogue” members of law enforcement and the mafia, to follow innocent people around and harass them day and night. Many of these evil people hack into innocent person’s (like me ) email and mail, and vandalize their home or cars. But the worst of Gangstalking is something known as “Noise Campaigning” where the police and members of mafia harass the innocent individual with loud noise day and night. “They feel there is no way out but to end it all”. This was the way I used to feel until one day I got angry……”Real Angry”. At my neighbors, at the racist cops (I’m an African-American female), even at the U.S. Government. I determined that as a Christian, “forgiveness is NOT enough!!!” I had to take my power back, and I did. I decided to harden my heart and even told God there were certain things I wouldn’t accept any longer. “I’m better now”.

    • #2089
      Heather Lopez
      Participant

      As an individual who is deeply interested in the conflicts in the Near East and in the country of Israel in general (hence me participating in this course), I valued Dr. Nicholson’s focus being a Hebraic leader within your own community before attempting to be a Hebraic leader in a community you are essentially unconnected to, such as the Near East. The Christian is not intended to go through life on their own, but rather in community. If we are failing to build and participate in this community where we live, we will inevitably fail to build and grow community in another environment. In the coming weeks, I plan to intentionally interact with my own community in a way that helps both myself and the community itself grow. A few examples I came up with are attending a local Christian college group; finding opportunities to share both about Israel and how God has been working in my life through this course; and participating in interfaith events where I can build relationships with people from different backgrounds.

      • #2644
        Mitchell Schwab
        Participant

        Hi Heather,

        I enjoyed reading your post. I also feel strongly that interfaith events is an important step for any Christian. There are so many churches with so many perspectives. Whenever I seek to understand and empathize with others, I begin to understand more about who God is, why Jesus did what he did, and why he loves us. It also strengthens my own understanding and testimony of Christ. I also like your emphasis on our need for community. Isn’t it interesting how the Lord mentions repeatedly in the Old Testament that he will “gather” His people in the last days? Gathering indicates the importance for us to be unified in one body of Christ. The more we come together as Christians, the more power we’ll have.

      • #3045
        Tanner Hauck
        Participant

        Hey Heather,

        I really enjoyed your response and think you are spot on with wanting to be a leader in your own community before attempting the same in a disconnected community. I think this insight speaks to the power of community as you hint at – engaging with the people around you strengthens your understanding of an area, it’s people, and ultimately it’s culture (and the complex problems it’s unique culture holds). I think, maybe less explicitly, engaging in one’s own community teaches an individual how to engage others which is an important step when attempting to lead in an unfamiliar environment.

        Best, Tanner

    • #2217
      Dan Harre
      Participant

      A deeper understanding of Hebraic leadership augments my understanding of how to reach Muslims with the Gospel. My wife and I are church planters and have a heart for unreached people groups. Specifically, we desire to reach our Arab neighbors who don’t know the Gospel. By understanding the Hebraic/Near Eastern context of my own faith, I feel that it will be easier for me to relate to and connect with my Arab neighbors. As this course says, it is important to first know who we are before we can engage with other cultures.

      • #2235
        Steve Allen
        Participant

        As a church planter myself, I admire your calling and heart for reaching Muslim peoples with the truth of the Gospel. Church planting is difficult–even when you are not endeavoring to cross worldviews. I will pray for you that this course may aid you in discerning ways in which your Arab neighbors are not homogenous with their greater faith community, in hopes that this may help build bridges of mutual respect and genuine relationship and Gospel influence.

    • #2234
      Steve Allen
      Participant

      While reviewing the materials and listening to the lectures, I was moved to thoughtfulness regarding arenas, like “my neighborhood, wherein I observe people of differing worldviews, political persuasions, and societal positions, struggling to live and work with civility towards one another. I had never thought of the Hebraic “map” as one which abides plurality–and which even affirms personality. My “neighborhood” arenas–both literally and figuratively speaking–include the following: (1) my physical neighborhood, which is a diverse ex-urban community where racism and anti-semitic expressions recur periodically; (2) my denominational context, in which a past history of racism and politicized racial theory, causes churches “of color” to sometimes forgo their affiliation, because they feel as though they are unwelcome or misunderstood; (3) my church, which struggles at times to know how–and to what extent–women should be affirmed in the practice of ministry; (4) a local clergy network, in which an incredibly broad array of worldviews come together around common-grace matters in our community, to express concern for the dispossessed and victimized, and to express a common voice of opposition for injustice. While I cannot say that I have a well-defined plan for exhibiting Hebraic leadership within any one of these arenas, I do wish to speak credibly, informedly, and courageously into these arenas. I feel as though Pathfinder may be opening a door for me to lead and speak in such a way that affirms differences and which demonstrates more openness around collaboration in light of Kingdom objectives.

      • #2711
        Conner Brew
        Participant

        Steve, I really love the way your response addresses multiple aspects of the Hebraic map and worldview. By acknowledging the differences and the diversity in your community, you become very well-poised to approach crisis leadership in your community with a mindset of deity, personality, history, plurality, and responsibility. Recognizing that different people and communities come from different perspectives borne of unique histories and experiences, you position yourself to more effectively listen, understand, and communicate across the landscape of your community and lead it therefore toward the Kingdom of God.

    • #2252
      Biancá Alexander
      Participant

      One tangible way that I plan on exhibiting Hebraic Leadership in my own neighborhood, by creating a program to encourage others to ‘love thy neighbor’ in community first and then into the other regions of the world. I will work with neighboring churches to come together to learn about each other and how we can better support each others’ initiatives that support our neighborhood. We have many churches in or neighborhood but we do not work together at all. We can do so much kingdom building if we came together as churches, despite denomination. The burden of the moral health of our community should be on the churches, to pray and help our neighbors.

    • #2255
      Mitchell Hailstone
      Participant

      One thing that stood out to me from this course is the reminder that God is relational and active in our lives. He isn’t a “clockmaker” God that the Hellenistic worldview conjured. He’s a living God who plays an active role in our affairs. Personally, I have the tendency to forget that God is particularly interested in me—as well as every other individual. I often “systematize” my theology and political opinions, and I forget that each individual has their own lived experiences and relationship with God. Being reminded that the Hebraic God, the one we worship in the Christian faith, is a personal one who loves and cares about all his creation equally will encourage me to love my neighbors, friends and family more as a result of taking this course.

      • #2259
        Max Prowant
        Participant

        Hi Mitchell. I thought this was a good post. I tend to do exactly the same and lose myself in rational arguments about faith and cosmology. I think you’re right that simply reminding ourselves of the living God of scripture, of one who is actively involved in our lives, can be a healthy and sufficient remedy. I think you’re right to that that small reminder can help us be more active and engaged with others.

    • #2258
      Max Prowant
      Participant

      I am in the process of moving to Arlington VA, just outside of Washington DC. The move is an opportune time to exhibit Hebraic leadership by engaging with my new community. In DC one is tempted to climb the ranks of political power and change the world in accordance with his or her cosmology. I’ll certainly do what I can in this regard. But a simpler exhibition of Hebraic leadership and more realistic one is to join a church and be active with the church community. As Robert said in the course, Christians do not walk alone but need a community. Becoming an active member of a church would deepen my faith and allow me to aid fellow travelers in the same way. Engaging with a church and inviting friends to do the same would prioritize faith and remind me of the duties I have in this exile period.

      • #2575
        Christina Sturgeon
        Participant

        Congrats on your journey to DC; I hope you find what you’re looking for. I’ve grown up in and around DC and, while it has a reputation for housing some power-hungry people, I think you’ll also be pleasantly surprised by folks here who strive because of their love of God. It’s such a transient city, but with each new arrival, there’s a breath of something “else” that’s added to the mixing bowl. Some churches in the area do a good job at investing in the community around them, although diving deep within the church congregation is good and necessary, too. I’m always struck by Jeremiah’s words (29:5-7) and its implications. I think we don’t initially plan to “hunker down” when we see we’re in exile; usually it’s a “flee to the next good option…anything is better than this” mentality. But we’re to settle down—to “plant gardens and eat what they produce.” That garden image is sweet; we’re to stick around to see and reap from our hard labor and patience. It’s not about the timing of things, but the quality of things that can/do/will happen within this/these exile period(s).

    • #2334
      Monique Leach
      Participant

      I would show the love of Christ, “King of the Jews” by going by to visit my sick, elderly neighbor, “Jim” more often. He has congestive heart failure and is very sick. I also would react with less anger to my neighbors who constantly harass me with noise and sound for my witness for Christ. They do not like me, and over the years, I have felt my heart growing cold and full of hate due to their daily harassment of me. In addition, the birds constantly “squawk” at me, and one of the neighbors dogs always barks at me. I would exhibit Hebrew leadership by ignoring my neighbors and ignoring the birds and dogs as well. Because I am harassed “every time” I go out into my back yard, I will stop playing with my dog in my back yard. I will also ONLY go outside of my house to retrieve my mail every day. That way I will have peace. Jim is a Christian and he is my only friend on the block. I fear he is dying. Because his esophagus is messed up, I can rarely talk to him, but I will check in on him more. That’s how I’ll exhibit Hebrew leadership in my neighborhood.

      • #2710
        Conner Brew
        Participant

        Monique, this is a fantastic way to demonstrate seekership of the Kingdom. By walking with Jim more intentionally and purposefully, you can gain a deeper sense of responsibility for your neighbors and your neighborhood. I would challenge you, in addition to walking with Jim who is already a Christian, to seek out ways to work amidst the spiritual warfare of your community – where in your community is Christian leadership desperately needed? Where is a deeper sense of hebraic worldview critical to solving a problem that your community faces, and how can you walk in that crisis to lead your community to the Kingdom?

    • #2510
      Joe Alvarez
      Participant

      After taking this course one thing I kinda forgot is that we as Christians are not to walk alone. We must find a church and do so as a group as we walk in faith and tell others about the gospel. I just recently joined a church that I was watching livestreams online from and decided to go to a service this past weekend. I’m definitely going back for another service and hopefully more. I just want to lead people to Christ and His kingdom by sharing the gospel to them with truth but also compassion while keeping God at the center of everything. People say I’m humble as well so that will definitely help as I talk to others about the gospel. For the longest I didn’t even know what my purpose was in life until recently, even though I always believed in God and was telling people about Jesus. Took me a while but now I know I meant to save souls so that can get into the Kingdom.

    • #2529
      Katherine Zehnder
      Participant

      I plan to exhibit Hebraic Leadership in my own community by maintaining a mindset that I am always learning. I really enjoyed this course on leadership, and I hope I can become a better leader because of it. I want to help my community by volunteering, in ways that benefit the community. One thing I have been doing is volunteering at a local ranch that ministers to kids that come from broken homes. I plan to continue doing this as well as finding other ways to benefit my community. Furthermore, I also want to maintain the mindset of always learning and keeping an open mind, I want to continually learn about other cultures and religions and understand them in a better way. I also plan to stay close to the baseline, by intentionally, fasting, praying or doing other things which will “simulate suffering” in order to achieve clarity in my own life.

      • #2645
        Mitchell Schwab
        Participant

        Katherine,

        What you are doing at the local ranch is admirable to say the least! Life is so tough on kids in our day even for those who do not hail from “broken homes.” However, for those who do come from difficult backgrounds, life seems like it is mere bombardment and never joyful. One thing about this perspective of Hebraic Leadership that fascinates me is that life is expected to be a bombardment of trials and tests. I’ve come to realize that those who endure the most difficult of circumstances are often those with the most pure spirits with unbelievable leadership traits. Your willingness to help them, spend time with them, and love them will help them recognize their true potential. Well done, Katherine. Keep doing your best in your community. The butterfly effect is a real thing and it will pay massive dividends in their lives.

      • #2775
        Christian Brehmer
        Participant

        That is awesome Katherine! That is a great way to represent the Hebraic leadership in your neighborhood. I will be praying for your community that you volunteer in as you represent the Kingdom. That’s also great that you want to maintain an open mindset with others. So often that’s how we can become true neighbors to others, by learning about their cultures and religions.

    • #2643
      Mitchell Schwab
      Participant

      The same thought has been recurring in my mind throughout this course — the Christian youth. They are bombarded daily by the digital world, counter-Christianity movements, and atheistic worldviews. I’m currently a lawyer, a regional youth leader in my church, charter school board chairperson, and the head basketball coach at the local public high school. This course has caused me to reflect on my current leadership roles and how to exhibit Hebraic leadership in each of my responsibilities. As far as applying this to my neighborhood, I have a strong desire to develop an interfaith leadership coalition for Christian Youth. I envision working with local pastors to develop a local leadership program that will prepare young men and women for life’s challenges, especially in this digital age. I hope to partner with Passages to send the youth on a trip to Israel as a capstone to the leadership program. I firmly believe there is no better time than now to unite the Christian community behind the global cause of Christ. The Philos Project seems to be ahead of the game. This course was fantastic.

      • #2658
        Christiana Gellert
        Participant

        Thank you for that ministry, @Mitchell! I attended public schools and lacked responses to the anti-Christian indoctrination I received in my classes and from my classmates. At that time, social media was just starting to become common among teens, and we were starting to engage heavily with it without any ideas of the dangers (or opportunities for evangelization). However, a couple of my teachers (especially in extra-curricular activities!) were bravely open about their Christian faith, and the values they instilled in me were highly instrumental in my desire to delve deeper into my faith later in life.

      • #2840
        Sean Moore
        Participant

        Hi Christiana. I work in a public high school as a career counselor, and it really is interesting how many at the school are so closed minded to a non-secular way of thinking, much less an Abrahamic way. I had a very good conversation with a staff member the other day just talking about my private school, about how it was religious based, and why my parents did not want me to go to public school. It was very interesting that the teacher could not comprehend even teaching the classes from a biblical way, and outright said that should be outlawed. Very eye opening.

    • #2668
      Kenneth C. Jackson
      Participant

      There are so many best and tangible ways that I plan to exhibit Hebraic leadership in my neighborhood after the completion of this course. However, I will share one practical tangible way: The one tangible way I will be exhibiting this leadership is by leading by life-style. I strongly believe that practicing what I will be learning and also sharing it with others is core to me and my ministry. In my culture, I mean my neighborhood (home or workplace), life-style living draws people to God more than quoting John 3:16. In fact, there are many of my neighbors who just need me to talk to them. Indeed, they need me to smile with them, and share time with them. This is why I am not taking this training lightly. With the knowledge, understanding, wisdom, and relationship with God from this training, it will draw my neighbors from far and near closer to a table where they can taste and see the goodness of God through me from this training. In short, this leadership training is not about me but the thousands of neighbors in my neighborhood

    • #2709
      Conner Brew
      Participant

      I currently work at a local church as the Director of Development, responsible for ensuring that everyone in our church has access to the offerings that meet their needs and cultivate an atmosphere of discipleship. I also run a local community development nonprofit, where we work hard to connect the church directly to the people and communities of our city to provide necessary services, supplies, and support. I have always felt that an essential trait of leadership is taking someone somewhere they couldn’t get to on their own: leading them. The Hebraic principles of the Pathfinder leadership program nestle very nicely into that philosophy – to seek the Kingdom first (Matt 6) and to take my church and my community with me is my ultimate leadership goal. I want to work harder to approach my community with an eye on its deity, personality, history, plurality, and a sense of responsibility. Conducting ministry in Charlottesville, VA, tensions are nearly always high – we have a storied history of racial conflict, economic conflict, and spiritual conflict. The role of the church, and the Christian leader, is to plant itself like a tree by water in the midst of this crisis and lead toward the Kingdom. I plan to engage my city with that eye, to seek the Kingdom through service and coercive leadership, and to grow in my own faith while working to disciple others around me.

    • #2712
      Brynn Schwartz
      Participant

      After completing the initial course work I have realized there are many ways I can use my current skills and interests to lead in my community. I have been involved with a local organization that works with the foster care system locally and I want to step out and recruit my young friends (church community and others) to get involved as well. It’s a beautiful way to serve the “orphan and the widow” even when you don’t have the capacity to take anyone in yourself. I am also involved in the local arts through my pottery work. I’m excited to do local markets and use that as an opportunity to give back to the community as well as stretch myself. I would also love to combine my two current passions and create a program for inner city kids to have an opportunity to create art. Using your hands to create something reminds you of the effort and thought that went into your own creation, and I can’t wait to let children in my community experience that revelation in a tangible way.

    • #2720
      Carlos Vargas
      Participant

      This course is the beginning of a journey. We have been given gifts and using them correctly is the key. Our community is growing and using my gift to help others to connect with God and their community is what I want to get more involved in. help others so we together can change our community.

    • #2773
      Christian Brehmer
      Participant

      For the past few months, I have been praying throughout the day, “Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done in earth, as it is in heaven.” It has brought me great peace when struck with the news of injustice or faced with complex policy challenges at work. Since completing this course, I have found volunteer opportunities to help those in need. The Hebraic mindset reminds me I can be an active agent on earth and not sit idly by. I will be participating in feeding the poor in my community with peers at my work, and connecting more with my local church’s volunteer opportunities.

    • #2838
      Sean Moore
      Participant

      In my current job, I am an administrator in education. While I use to hate the idea of the bureaucracy when I was younger, I now find myself as a small part in that larger cog. I can control in small ways who gets scholarships, which professors get promoted, and what types of employers we have visit the college. The last chapter of pathfinder was my favorite, as I have always wondered what does the Bible find to be ethical when it comes to biblical use of pollical power. So, how can I apply this lesson. There were several takeaways from my reading of Abraham. He is fair, conciliatory, but also firm when he needs to be with Lot. He compromised, even though he had the larger family and could have taken it with the sword. This is a practice that I need more of in my life, but also something America could learn from. Too many times in modern America, we hear that we “cannot compromise” with Americans who are different then us. It is a lesson we have forgotten, and if we continue to never give any ground it could lead to terrible results.

      • #2866
        Victoria Franklin
        Participant

        Hi Sean,
        Your comment on compromise and politics here in America really resonated with me. Oftentimes we take a “My way or the highway” approach here and you’re 100% right– it leads to not so great results. In the Bible we see the examples of leaders who were strong but also conciliatory. I think this is because of the importance of possessing humility in Hebraic leadership. Without humility there would be no good accomplished.

      • #2914
        Miriam Cavanaugh
        Participant

        Hi Victoria,
        Your comment about how important humility is to a good leader resonated with me. I keep having the words of the great author C.S. Lewis in my mind “Humility is not thinking less of yourself but thinking of yourself less!” A good leader needs to be free of his own ego in order to be thinking of the good of the other people entrusted to his care. Without the virtue of humility power cannot be exercised justly but will always be directed towards my own advantage.

    • #2881
      Austin Pellizzer
      Participant

      After taking this course, there are many ways in which I plan on integrating this course into my everyday life. One of them is constantly connecting with the Hebraic map’s personality pillar. As a young professional working in the world of Jewish student life and Israeli education, the idea that ‘Humans are also relational’ in the sphere of community and belonging is something I will strive to connect with daily. The need to find meaning, connectivity and belonging in the land of Israel is a critical part of making young adults see purpose in their work. As a result, I plan on using this method to inspire and make people realize how important community and leadership are to reconnecting with their roots in the land of Israel and, as a whole, the Near East.

    • #2906

      The most proficient way to lead or evangelize in biblical settings is to live an exemplary life that can be seen and understood. In Matthew 5:16, Jesus made mention of Christians shining their light (character) to may attract others to God’s Kingdom. So in my neighborhood, the first step is to be example of what I preach, thereby letting others know that what am asking of them is possible.

    • #2907
      Miriam Cavanaugh
      Participant

      I consider my family as my first neighbours that I have the duty and the pleasure to minister to. As a mother, it is indispensable to be a leader to my son, to teach him to seek first and foremost God and his kingdom and to exercise a virtuous life. One way to do this is to be leading by a good example, to take responsibility, to show him what patience, love and self-control mean. Like a stone is forming waves when it is thrown in water, my life is pulsating out of my own relationship with God and my engagement in my family. This vibrant center thus results in my active involvement in my catholic parish, where I recently founded a group of married couples to create fellowship and meaningful input and conversation. I also am part of the music ministry to help to evangelise the world through the beauty of songs. An even broader engagement that has been on my heart for a while is teaching German or English to refugees from Arabic-speaking countries who seek to learn the language of their new country. Having invested a many years and a good amount of work in a university degree of Arabic I feel now more than ever enabled to welcome and teach Arabic-speakers in their own language.

    • #2924
      Nomsa C Mmakola
      Participant

      One tangible way I plan to exhibit Hebraic leadership in my neighborhood is by serving God, and to serve God is by helping his children, our brothers and sisters, through tithing to build God’s Kingdom on earth and a generous offerings. Participate in Virtual Mass every Sunday, begin each day with Morning Prayer or meditation, read bible verses during Regular Nature walks, Participate in small Group Bible study sessions, Serve God through your family, Volunteer in your community, Home and Visiting Teaching, Donate clothing and other Goods, Be a friend, and Share the Gift of Reading.
      This course has opened my mindset of thinking, associating, and Leading in God kingdom.

    • #3041
      Loncey Elie
      Participant

      One important quality in Hebraic leadership that stood out to me is that it is not individualistic, but collective. I value this because in my experiences as a leader I believe that it is not all about you, it is bigger than you. I began to realize that what I do is not all about me, but it is about the impact that I make on the people around me by spreading the message about the kingdom of God. In my neighborhood, I have led by example in the way I conduct myself and also being a part of a tennis team effort to help the individuals in my community improve on their levels has served as a testimony about the importance of teamwork to make things happen. Several people and I have served our community since we have a strong passion for tennis and for four years I have been able to realize the strong love and growth we experience to elevate to a new level. What matters the most is our happiness and the inspiration we have for others in the small and big ways to enhance the kingdom of God.

      • #3047
        Tanner Hauck
        Participant

        Hey Loncey – great to hear from you and definitely agree with the sentiment about collectivism. The impact that you make on the people around you leads them to create impact and that initial seed of action grows exponentially which is what I think is so great about being a part of something bigger than yourself. I also respect you serving your community through your passion, taking something that you’re already involved in and skilled at and finding a way to use it for the betterment of the community is really admirable – kudos to you!

    • #3046
      Tanner Hauck
      Participant

      What is one tangible way that you plan to exhibit Hebraic leadership in your own neighborhood after taking this course?

      One tangible way that I plan to exhibit Hebraic leadership in my own neighborhood after taking this course is infusing intentionality into my daily interactions. Being present and engaged with the grocery clerk, the server at Sunday brunch, the eye doctor’s scheduling assistant. I think by treating each engagement with intentionality you’re able to better understand and connect with those in your community. I think beyond taking the time and effort to connect with people in my dozens of quick daily interactions I’m going to look into way I can assist with my local YoungLife chapter. I attended YoungLife all throughout high school and served as a leader for a semester in college. Now that I’ve graduated college and watch my younger brother go to YoungLife I’m reminded of the foundation that community provided for me. I’m still friends with many of the former leaders and will reach out to see if there’s a way for me to re-engage with that local community.

    • #1975
      Jaquan Bryant
      Participant

      To add on, Ecclesiastes 12:13 says to fear God and keep his commandments: for this is the whole duty of man. With being any kind of leader especially a Hebraic leader, you must have reverence, respect, this type of fear for God all while keeping his commandments. Not just the big 10 but the other ones mentioned in the scriptures of the new covenant. I think this is key to knowing your duty while serving the community you live. It compliments your walk with God of servitude. A leader always lead by example.

    • #1989
      Tina Joji
      Participant

      Hi John, great to read through your response and I am glad to hear that Christ has restored your journey towards accepting His salvation. You make several solid points as to what it means to be prominent Christian leader in a world swarmed with opinions and forks in the road. It is easy to follow someone when the path is straight, but it gets difficult for both sheep and Shepard when the path starts to curve. Praise be to God that He is our Shephard! You also stress the importance of learning to serve your intimate communities. I myself want to do better at this. It is easy to categorize ministry as international missions, but real missions can start within the home itself. I hope we can learn more about what this means through the Philos Project. God Bless you.

    • #2336
      Monique Leach
      Participant

      I was very “touched” and “humbled” to read your post of your road to salvation. My story began 22.5 years ago in September of 1999, when I came back from a woman’s retreat. I was in an “all-black”, pentecostal church, and when we came back from the retreat, I felt the urge to come forth at the altar call. I had been raised a black muslim,. but after attending the church for 2.5 years, I felt that Jesus Christ was the way. My life has been “incredibly difficult” since then, but I have NEVER DOUBTED that Jesus Christ is God and “no one else”.

    • #1991
      Tina Joji
      Participant

      Hi Josiah, thank you for sharing your thoughts on the relation between faith and the Filipino culture. I similarly discussed the impact of Indian culture on the Christian faith. I agree in how you emphasized the importance of serving locally in terms of the bigger picture. I very much agree that one of the pillars of a Christian’s active lifestyle should be plugging in to a local church. And if ordained by God, serving and leading at the church can also be gigantic blessings. I grew up in a South Indian American church in New York and till this day I am grateful to God that He gives me a chance to lead the Worship Team and be part of the Youth Group. I pray that God will also use the Philos Project to teach people like me and you, how to further serve our parishes, families, and communities on a daily basis. God Bless!

    • #2048
      Carrie Coffman
      Participant

      Hi Matthew!

      That sounds like such a cool opportunity to use what you know for the benefit of those around you! Having that level of knowledge about topics like those can definitely foster a greater understanding for those around you. It is amazing that you have so many resources so close to you – your ability to answer these common questions is perfect for where you are!

    • #2049
      Carrie Coffman
      Participant

      Hello Jacque!

      Your desire to further your involvement in your local church is such a good one, and it sounds like you have great ideas to benefit your community through your work there. Taking that step of leadership to develop a program that your area needs greatly is an awesome way to exhibit the Hebraic leadership we learned about. Praying that your work is fruitful and blessed by the Lord!

    • #2053
      Collin Bastian
      Participant

      Hi Jacque,

      I am so glad to see that you have recognized God’s calling to be a Hebraic leader in your life through your desire to assist and empower the youth in your area! I am praying for your success as you develop a program that can prevent the ills which you listed as well, which will hopefully improve their chances of a better life. But I am also thankful that you recognize the importance of modeling Godly behavior and Hebraic leadership, as this will ultimately provide the core of what they need to navigate life!

    • #2059
      Zack Jones
      Participant

      Hi Haley,

      I’ve come to see that much of the best leaders in Washington are not those who are on TV a lot, but those who intentionally build relationships and are serious about being hospitable. They understand that their biggest influence happens through relationships, and making others feel welcomed and loved. Exhibiting the kind of Hebraic leadership Robert is talking about will be attractive to those in DC who are used to self-seeking and temporal-minded behaviors. Loving your neighbors and your co-workers well, pointing them to where they can be going, is where leadership begins and ends.

    • #2672
      Evan Crain
      Participant

      I was drawn to the impact of the city of D.C. on the nation and the world in the past and present (and naturally, imagining my role in the future!), first interning on the Hill and eventually moving here. Many Hebraic leaders (whether they used the term or not), or as the Pathfinder course put it “enlightened deists,” over time have created a remarkable system of justice and order through God’s grace. I find their leadership and their reliance on God for wisdom in the use of power fantastic examples, and I really enjoy the examples of explicit dependence on God scattered throughout D.C. The Museum of the Bible flight simulator – while somewhat nauseating – features numerous examples of where to find these.

    • #2713
      Brynn Schwartz
      Participant

      Haley! I loved reading your response to this question. It rings so true in my own life and I think we as believers to often overlook the “small” moments in search of something more big and profound. The beauty is Yahweh works most often on our hearts through the small, intimate connections. So encouraging to hear you’re being intentional in Washington DC. It will be exciting to see the impact of someone slowing down to notice the small moments.

    • #2165
      Taylor Roth
      Participant

      Hi Madeline,

      I loved reading more about your thoughts on the course and how you plan to exhibit hebraic leadership within your own community! I believe you did a phenomenal job highlighting important lessons throughout this class, and I am excited to see how you use these concepts every day. I currently live in Washington, DC and am planning to move to Nashville this summer and am so glad you highlighted ways to get involved in the city! I love how you pinpointed how crucial it is to show up in this world to demonstrate true hebraic leadership.

      Best,
      Taylor

    • #2218
      Dan Harre
      Participant

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    • #2219
      Dan Harre
      Participant

      Madeleine,

      What a beautiful and succinct definition of Hebraic leadership. Your application of that definition in your own context is equally impressive. While our faith is drawn from the history of the Near East, its application is universal.

    • #2266
      Joseph Danaher
      Participant

      Madeleine, I think that’s a great example. There is sooooo much in the Old Testament, and in the New, about caring for the foreigner in need. Being part Syrian, I am mortified by what has happened to the Syrian people lately. But what is also troubling is not only that people lack empathy but that they have solid antipathy toward people who are suffering the most, wanting to bar them from entry entirely, regardless of safety precautions. This saddens me. But like you were discussing, I can’t let myself off the hook for having an empathetic position. Perhaps I too need to go to a local aid organization and personally, tangibly help.

    • #2511
      Joe Alvarez
      Participant

      Amen! I love that part too because it’s true. You definitely don’t need a title or anything to be a leader. A true leader will lead regardless of their title because they know what is needed to lead people to Christ. Loving one another and helping them out is exactly what a leader does. I have a powerful testimony that will help lead people to Christ’s Kingdom as well so I love that part when you said you wanted to use your voice. I do believe when people can relate to what you’ve been through and why you decided to follow Jesus will lead them to the Kingdom.

    • #2166
      Taylor Roth
      Participant

      Hi Karina,

      I loved taking the time to read your post and thoughts on how you plan to demonstrate Hebraic leadership in your community. I can certainly understand how this can be challenging, especially when you are in a new environment and seeking ways to get involved. I love how you highlighted how important it is to take the time to get to know people around you and their beliefs and interests. So often, we can become consumed with “doing” incredible things, without taking the time to learn from and engage with the people around us. After all, this personal understanding is necessary for hebraic leadership, because it allows us to truly have an impact in other people’s lives.

      Best,
      Taylor

    • #2220
      Dan Harre
      Participant

      Sarah, I love your heart for students. Out culture is indeed attempting to sell them a version of the hero’s journey. As we know, this journey does not ultimately satisfy the deepest longing of our souls. It is only the pursuit of our Lord that can give these young people the fulfillment that they desire.

    • #2512
      Joe Alvarez
      Participant

      You definitely don’t have to have a certain title or be someone who has earned the right to be a leader, so I’m happy to see that you know you can do so right where you’re at. Also you’re already a leader if you think about it because you have students. Now you just need to take that and use it to lead others to Christ and His Kingdom. You got this Felipe I believe in you!

    • #2530
      Katherine Zehnder
      Participant

      Hi Madeline,

      I really enjoyed your post! I also think it is cool that you live in Nashville. One of my friends graduated from pathfinder, work in the pro-Israel space and is moving to Nashville in a few months.

      I agree that being a Hebraic leader looks like getting involved in your community and church. As I said in my post, one thing that I do is volunteer at a local ranch that minister to kids from broken families.

    • #2531
      Katherine Zehnder
      Participant

      Hi Jacque,

      I really enjoyed your post! I agree that Hebraic leadership looks like being visible and accessible on days other than regularly scheduled days of worship, we need to be available to support and mentor people.
      As I said in my post, one thing that I do is volunteer at a local ranch that minister to kids from broken families. I can’t just show up when I feel like it, I have people counting on me.

    • #2535
      Christina Sturgeon
      Participant

      Hi Jacque! You’ve identified a hurt/ache and it brings me joy to know you’re trying to fill that void and be a balm in Louisville, KY. In seeking the welfare of the city, I pray others come to know the richness of community–esp one founded in God–and that everyone down here will not truly be satisfied until the return of the King. In college, I managed an art room at a local church that catered to a lot of Greenville, SC’s homeless population. There I learned the simplicity of working alongside and listening. At first I was self conscious of my background/what I had vs. what they didn’t, but that was hardly an obstacle because they just wanted to be truly seen as multi-faceted humans instead of just being passed by/seen as someone who just needs help. I think especially in the creative sphere, we tap into an often-neglected facet of who we’ve been made to be in God’s image: creators. More than just you, I’d be stoked to see how your Church body can help embrace their neighbors. God’s got this!

    • #2774
      Christian Brehmer
      Participant

      Hans, that is awesome to hear! Will keep you in prayers as you work with refugee communities from the Near East and Eastern Africa. Yes, what a beautiful vision in Isaiah 19. I will be praying specifically Isaiah 19:22 “They will turn to the Lord, and he will respond to their pleas and heal them.”

    • #2875
      Joshua Johnson
      Participant

      Dear Hans, this experience sounds fascinating. I love that these rich cultures are coming from all over these regions to Portugal and are hearing about and learning about the God of Israel, and coming to know Jesus personally! Syria, Iran, Sudan, that must be so amazing to hear their stories and the cultures they come from. I imagine that some of the languages they speak are rare and precious languages. I’m just curious, does anyone speak Neo-Aramaic dialects? (I have been exploring some of those dialects.) And that is fascinating they are coming to Portugal. Is there a particular program or government policy that brings them there?

      Either way, I would love to hear from you if possible, as I am fascinated by all things Middle East, especially language and culture, and hopefully I will have the change to hear about your work as well!

    • #2839
      Sean Moore
      Participant

      Hi Katie!

      I have no seen you since our undergrad at Regent. Hope you are well. Community involvement is huge! There was a extended family unit very important in most of the old testament, but you also had your church and town. Some of these have become lost in America, but their importance continues to be needed in our society.

    • #2986
      Sarah Victor
      Participant

      Yes I think who we are is so important to leadership: growing healthily and being a light from the inside out should be our goals. To your point about temporal-minded behaviors, this could apply not just to relationships and mentoring contexts but also to building the necessary skills and knowledge base to effectively make decisions in the longer term. The goal shouldn’t be publicity but when we build and promote a healthy culture, change automatically follows.

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