Have you ever consciously or subconsciously used your faith to examine foreign policy? Was it harmful or helpful? Please elaborate. - Pathfinder

Have you ever consciously or subconsciously used your faith to examine foreign policy? Was it harmful or helpful? Please elaborate.

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    • #1447
      pathfinderlms
      Keymaster
    • #1894
      Isaac Woodward
      Participant

      I believe that my Christian faith and the set of ideas that naturally flow from it are vital to how I approach foreign policy questions. Are humans fundamentally flawed with hope towards redemption in a well-ordered civil society or are we basically good with flaws stemming from corrupt societal structures? Our answers to questions like this color how we view every fundamental policy question.

      My faith also teaches me that all people are image-bearers with equal value and equal capacity for good or evil. Therefore, when I view a hostile regime like Iran, I do so with a sober mind, aware of the real potential for evil in the human heart, and not a naive Eurocentric view that bad actors on the world stage are merely the result of Western Imperialism. There is no “noble savage” existing in a state of grace prior to contact with civilization. This means we must give evil its due and not underestimate the power of its influence in foreign affairs.

      • #2742
        Michaela Todd
        Participant

        Isaac, what an eloquent way to pose this dilemma human have grappled with for ages. As you said, when someone answers which viewpoint they see the human race as, it drastically impacts how they would view foreign policy. I can find myself swayed by my emotions when looking at another country like Iran and have a knee-jerk reaction that doesn’t reflect that all people are image-bearers of God. This is also what is missing from American policy leaders today, especially from those who claim to be followers of Christ. If we want America to be impactful in foreign policy and establishing peace across the world, we have to get back to that mindset and to the fundamental values of our country.

      • #2799

        Hi Michaela,

        I firmly believe in getting back into the mindset and fundamental values of our country are so important for foreign policy. I may not be in a war where there are guns and bombs, but I have the most powerful weapon; the rosary. Because of the prayer of the rosary, specifically as a Roman Catholic, I have seen and will continue to see God’s powerful work in us and our nation. Then, stepping outside of my Catholicism, it is so good to learn about all the different denominations of Christians as they too pray in similar ways. When I pray the psalms daily with what is called the Liturgy of the Hours, I can say with the psalmist, “O praise the Lord, Jerusalem! Zion, praise your God! (Psalm 147:12)”

      • #3012
        Deneisha Hollis
        Participant

        Hello Isaac,
        I agree we can’t separate the bad or good that the bible exposes us to from the foreign policies in corrupt governmental structures. We have to hold ourselves or others accountable to what is wrong in the world. Even though people may feel like they have no voice in foreign policy, Jesus makes it known that every voice matters such as the woman who gave her last coin to the temple. Every little choice and decision to speak against war, corruption, and abuse is us answering God’s call to us as Christians.

      • #3240
        Sarah Valdez
        Participant

        I really love this outlook on this topic. Putting our faith first should always be the priority and I believe that God has a purpose and plan for each of us to do so. I specifically appreciate your comment at the end of your statement, we can not let evil run rampant. We must do something about it and be aware that as Believers we must take a stance on what we can do. It’s easy to turn a blind eye but I know that once a person knows the truth, we have to act on it.

      • #3422
        Iliana Owen-Alcala
        Participant

        Hi Issac,

        What you say is so true. Faith should flow from us naturally under any context and especially in such important matters, such as foreign policy. Foreign affairs should not be underestimated because they can affect us on an individual level that might not be visible at first glance. Most of us are Christians here so we understand how God should be the center of every aspect of our lives and keeping Him out of foreign issues cannot be, in turn, fundamentally good.

      • #3423
        Iliana Owen-Alcala
        Participant

        Hi Issac,

        What you say is so true. Faith should flow from us naturally under any context and especially in such important matters, such as foreign policy. Foreign affairs should not be underestimated because they can affect us on an individual level that might not be visible at first glance. Most of us are Christians here so we understand how God should be the center of every aspect of our lives and keeping Him out of foreign issues cannot be, in turn, fundamentally good.

    • #2614
      Denise DeVatt
      Participant

      I use my faith every day when discussing or thinking about foreign policy towards all area, not just Israel. This past month I was apart of Passages’ Faith and Foreign Policy Fellowship and it really helped me to utilize my faith in responding to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, specifically. Because I am a Christian, I believe that God loves all people, even those that are calling for the downfall of not only the state of Israel, but the United States as well. I believe that we have a duty to act in a way that shows our understanding of our faith and our love of others because God loves them, and we are supposed to love the people of the world as well. I am still evaluating and deciding some things that I believe but I do know that I was called to love my neighbor as myself, and it is my duty to do that, regardless of anything else.
      Going a step further, I believe that we as the United States do have a responsibility to help any and all people that we can, because that is what we have made ourselves known for, and people depend on us. While we aren’t a Christian country, we do say that we were founded on “Judeo-Christian values” and we must uphold those values: liberty and prosperity for all, and we have a duty to protect and defend those values internationally.
      I think that using my background and values as a Christian to respond to foreign policy is helpful. It helps me to remember that everybody is human, and everybody is deserving of basic human rights, and “no distinction shall be made on the basis of the political, jurisdictional, or international status of the country or territory to which a person belongs,” as per the UN Declaration of Human Rights.

      • #2743
        Michaela Todd
        Participant

        Denise, thank you for sharing your experience and insight with Passages. It sounds like a very informative and moving program, I feel that I am receiving a similar experience taking the Pathfinder courses. Like you, I believe that as Christians we have a duty to live our lives of faith by not reflecting the world, but reflecting Christ – and Christ shows compassion, grace, and love to all of the precious people of the world. I also agree with you that if the United States want to make impactful changes of peace and prosperity in the world, and continue to preserve our own, we must uphold our founding Judeo-Christian values of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. It’s seems clear to me that country and public policy leaders have strayed from these core values that shocked the world and established the freest nation on earth, and it is why I believe we are witnessing our country at a very serious crossroads both internally and globally.

      • #2744
        Michaela Todd
        Participant

        Denise, thank you for sharing your experience and insight with Passages. It sounds like a very informative and moving program, I feel that I am receiving a similar experience taking the Pathfinder courses. Like you, I believe that as Christians we have a duty to live our lives of faith by not reflecting the world, but reflecting Christ – and Christ shows compassion, grace, and love to all of the precious people of the world. I also agree with you that if the United States want to make impactful changes of peace and prosperity in the world, and continue to preserve our own, we must uphold our founding Judeo-Christian values of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. It’s seems clear to me that our country and public policy leaders have strayed from these core values that shocked the world and established the freest nation on earth, and it is why I believe we are witnessing America at a very serious crossroads both internally and globally.

      • #2750
        Mitchell Schwab
        Participant

        Denise.

        I enjoyed reading your insight and perspective here. The discussion of human rights, policy, international law, local law, national law, and religious freedom is so intriguing and thought provoking that a short response to your post will not do it justice. In short, I’m an attorney and have much to say about your post but will be brief. I agree that our actions must reflect the actions of a true disciple of Christ. I also agree that we have a duty to act in love toward others to the fullest extent possible. The interesting line here has to do with our stepping outside our rightful stewardship to assist others in love. Many times throughout history, Christians have reached out to do the “right thing” in the name of Christianity while causing more harm than good. I think we have to be overly conscious about the butterfly effect of our actions even when done with the best intentions. I don’t say this to demean anything you said. I’m just highlighting the fact that good intentions often lead to bad results. Philos Project has done a great job at highlighting those issues in previous courses.

      • #2982
        Sarah Victor
        Participant

        Mitchell, I appreciate your perspective. As an attorney as well, I think our perspective on agency forces us to be more careful in how we construe who is responsible for what. Ascribing to ourselves responsibility for our actions is important, but so is realizing the powers that exist outside us, and this balance is necessary when coming up with a strategy that is effective in engaging on international relations and policy. Otherwise, we risk creating more problems instead of solving them.

      • #2820
        Ariel Fierro
        Participant

        I a hundred percent agree with you, Denise, that as Christians, our duty is to act in a way that reveals our understanding of faith and love for others because God has provided great examples to love those around us and then some. We are meant to assist, guide, love and care for others as a tangible example of how God designed us to be. Additionally, I am totally on board with your closing statement that “we are all human, and no distinction shall be made based on the political, jurisdictional, or international status of the country or territory to which a person belongs,” as per the UN Declaration of Human Rights.

      • #2997

        Thank you for sharing Denise! I agree with you, I do believe our faith should be the lens through which we view anything in life, including foreign policy. I love how you emphasized that loving our neighbors should be our priority as Jesus Christ did say that this is the second greatest commandment. Once we understand this, it is then important for us to think about what loving our neighbors looks like when it comes to foreign policy. I am aware that many individuals believe that the US should not interfere with the politics of other nations, however, simply ignoring the plight of the Israelis and Palestinians in a conflict like this is not loving our neighbors. They are suffering and I do believe we do have a duty to help them in order to uphold the values that we stand for as a country, as you mentioned.

      • #3013
        Deneisha Hollis
        Participant

        Hello Denise,
        I agree the more we humanize each other and stop looking at others as either lesser or underserving we will solve a lot of the worlds problems. Christian need to practice being the leaders of justice, liberty, and equality in every aspect. Even when we may not agree with others beliefs or decisions as long as it is not hurting others or going against our commandments as Christian, we must respect them. Foreign policy in the past and present has been used to manipulate, oppress, and assimilate others. We can not let the agenda of powerful people change the vision of Christ.

    • #2740
      Michaela Todd
      Participant

      It has only been within the past couple of years that I’ve consciously recognized that if I truly want to live out my faith in Christ, it must be reflected in all aspects of where I stand on issues – especially now that I’m working in a position that touches public policy every day. I know that as Christians we are called to be a light in the world, to love all of God’s precious creations that He made in his image, and we are also called to be a mighty force in the world with Christ in us. Putting that mindset into political and foreign policy is jarring to me, and I think it is because the United States government and political sphere has drifted from our founding principles that reflect the views of Christianity. As Professor Mead said in the conclusion of this course, America has become devastatingly divided and views all issues in extremes on both the Left and the Right. God calls us to be contributing members of society and to be in the world living in Christ – and that most certainly pertains to participating in government roles. We are called to be disciples and to spread the Gospel across all nations, therefore Christians need to be involved in foreign policy. The big question is, how? That is what I am growing in and appreciate the courses in Philos providing information and different perspectives on the subject.

      • #3241
        Sarah Valdez
        Participant

        I love your statement, “God calls us to be contributing members of society” – truly inspiring and encourages me that I have a purpose and destiny to fulfill. If course we have roles to play in our own hometown and city but it’s important to note we have duties as citizens of this world because we have a belief in Christ who came for this world in the first place. How is a huge question and I believe with more pray, guidance and education/information we can find solutions. Thank you for sharing.

    • #2749
      Mitchell Schwab
      Participant

      I have absolutely used my faith to examine foreign policy regarding the Near East, both consciously and subconsciously. I have done this because I know God is not a God of coincidence. He is actively involved in the affairs of this world, especially with regard to His covenant people. As such, putting my faith aside would put blinders on my perspective which I cannot do. However, as of late (within the past 5 years or so), I have increasingly began to view the Middle East through the eyes of the locals and outside of my own biased lens in order to more fully understand the perspective of Palestinians, Jews, and other Near East stakeholders. This perspective has greatly enhanced my empathy for Near East residents. Though my faith influences my foreign policy perspective, the empathetic approach I have implemented also influences my perspective. I believe this to be the best approach.

      • #2797

        Hi Mitchell,

        Thank you for writing and sharing your opinion with us. I totally agree with having an empathetic approach when looking at what influences you regarding foreign policy. That is one of the reasons I am so interested in the Philos Project. For example, the Philos Action League intrigues me because it is about giving white roses in response to anti-semitism. It is a peaceful but powerful way to show our support and love for the Jewish people. It is a wordless empathy, but the white of a rose is truly touching and beautiful.

    • #2796

      Taking this class has brought me spiritual enlightenment. While studying foreign policy, and hearing the common word, “Christian,” I began to wonder why we keep saying “Christian,” but absolutely nothing about Christ Himself. Looking at foreign policy with my faith has been very helpful. To elaborate, when Professor Mead, in his final lecture, encouraged us to pray as Christians, it felt like foreign policy was no longer unsolvable or unpeaceful. I think of what I know of Christ who is Love. Yet, I see around me, not simply in the Near East, but most dramatically in the United States that Christianity is pulled apart or watered-down. I actually have an opinion now–I’m not just hesitant and unsure. I believe that if we become involved with foreign policy and “enter” the problems of the Near East, we should first look at our own country. Before helping Lebanon, a very Christina country, what about the Unities States and the fear of praying the pledge of allegiance because it includes, “under God”? And what about the increasing laws against Christianity in the US regarding reproductive rights and the fear–that even I have as a devout Christian–that I will be hated or dismissed for expounding upon my belief in Christ to others. What about my own family? Am I a Christian to them? How, then, can I expect a policy in the Near East to be true, good, and of God? The most simple solution that Professor Mead presented was prayer. That is something Christ taught us because we are surrendering all things to God and are trusting that God will make all things new.

      • #2819
        Ariel Fierro
        Participant

        I understand where you are coming from, Jacqueline. Christianity in the United States is water-downed. It may be even to the point that there are misinterpretations with the text itself. Additionally, I understand the point of focusing on our nation before lending a hand to others outside the United States. Although Professor Mead presented prayer as the solution to all issues, I believe we do have to use our faith to the full extent. Not to the extent of casting the first stone, but walking and talking the way Jesus did. Jesus had many issues surrounding him, not only about him being cast astray by the Jewish people but taking in others’ issues – helping a man walk again, giving sight to the blind, etc. Hebrews 13:16 states, “Don’t forget to do good and to share what you have because God is pleased with these kinds of sacrifices.” Despite our internal (and external) struggles, we must lend a hand to our brothers and sisters.

      • #3185
        Dominique Hoffman
        Participant

        Hi Jacqueline,

        I agree with you that the West is moving further and further away from policy rooted in Christian faith, it has evolved into a Western tradition with ideas borrowed from a past rooted in faith. While I think you are right, the domestic politics and ideologies of our current leaders do not promote Christian values (and foreign policy is largely influenced by the culture of the administration) we still have a part in advocating for pluralism and peace in the Near East. As Christians we know prosecution will come. The experiment of America has offered a unique period in time for Christian ideas to flourish, but we were never promised this and persecution should not discourage our activism on foreign issues. The Great Commission and our love for our neighbors should encourage activism in the Near East, regardless of domestic politics.

    • #2818
      Ariel Fierro
      Participant

      Romans 13:1 states, “Let every person be subject to the governing authorities. For there is no authority except from God, and those that exist have been instituted by God.”

      There is a reason why God has placed those in authority around the world. When it comes to foreign policy, I have

      As a child, I have been taught to obey those in authority and the rules that are in place. As I got older, I understood more about certain authoritative figures having evil intentions and certain policies that have been in place. That said, I began diving deeper into the Bible to comprehend why history contained bad results. Romans 13:1 assisted me in understanding why history is the way it is and determining my stances on present and futuristic issues. Coming into foreign policy, using my faith, consciously and subconsciously, to examine foreign policy has always been helpful. One will say it is harmful In the sense that it clouds one’s judgment, but it helps set a precedent of how things should flow.

    • #3011
      Deneisha Hollis
      Participant

      My faith is deeply rooted in how I perceive the world and foreign policy. I believe if it does not promote goodwill and build the kingdom of God then we should reevaluate it. I believe that Christianity teaches people to call out hypocrisy and to love all people. If policies deter from doing these things then they are not founded on my beliefs and I have to advocate for those afflicted by them. If I do not believe my faith impacts all levels of my life I would not be able to fully receive God’s promise. I can not compartmentalize foreign policy away from my religion because Jesus did not separate his beliefs from his everyday life. When I see injustice I am better able to help with the solution by using scriptures from the bible and following the teachings of Jesus. It has helped me understand the Israel-Palestinian conflict, racism in America, and other world isssues such as world hunger or genocide.

      • #3184
        Dominique Hoffman
        Participant

        Hi Deneisha,

        I completely agree, as Christians/leaders it is our job to promote the principles found in the Bible in all areas of our lives, including in areas of foreign policy or politics (wether as a voter or as a leader in politics). The entire vision for the Philos Project and the Pathfinders course is for Christians to proliferate faith into all areas of life. Specifically with foreign policy which is a process that often addresses wars, conflicts, and historic events — all of history is moving towards the Second Coming including all events that occur on the international political stage.

      • #3232
        Samuel Lowry
        Participant

        Hello Deneisha,
        We cannot compartmentalize our faith. God is to be centric and influencing every aspect of who we are. Our faith directly influences how we want to (and should) live. This topic though brings up a conversation I had, and it got a bit heated. Should Pastors be discussing politics at church? I have heard “No”, and that people just want to focus on Jesus while at church. Other say that pastors focus too much on one area of politics versus another. Or maybe pastors are forcing which way to vote. I believe that if we cannot compartmentalize Christ, then it seems rational to talk about politics at church. And, I like what one guy says. He actually wants a pastor that would be willing to discuss those topics because it gives us the education and biblical foundation for how we should vote. You don’t know what you don’t know. And I lean on what this guy says. I want a pastor that will educate me, not force me, but tell me what the bible says about certain political issues, so I can make the right decisions. Of course, I need to do my own research and seek after God’s will, but having further support is always helpful. What are your thoughts?

    • #3182
      Dominique Hoffman
      Participant

      My worldview is largely shaped by my background (education, work experience, travel). I was homeschooled most my life and went to a classical college prep program where I learned the fundamental of both my Christian faith, Enlightenment thought, and the intersection of both. My worldview developed in college, where I received a robust understanding of international theory and thought. Because of my background in classical education, I attained my undergraduate and masters degrees through a biblical lens. While most of the international theory I learned was taught from a secular perspective, my understanding of sin nature helped me conceptualize key theories and helped me form my own options. For example, I am a realist– I see state’s motivation as being rooted in self-interest driven by the insecurities of the international system indicative of the Fall. The one thing I would disagree with was when the professor stated theory is not important. I actually think international theory is a lens through which to view how world leaders see human nature. Most non-Western countries operate out of realism, the tenets of Western values which propel cooperation through liberal institutions are missing from most civilizational blocs. For example, Egypt is hosting COP27 and China hosted the Beijing Olympic despite both countries egregious human rights records. They engage in the puppeteer of international diplomacy through intergovernmental organizations to protect state interests without the implementation of international law. Ideas of intrinsic value and individuality, women rights, and religious freedom don’t exist outside Western influence. So to answer the question, religion is helpful in every way when it comes to examining foreign policy.

      • #3231
        Samuel Lowry
        Participant

        Hi Dominique,
        I, too, was homeschooled prior to going to college. Well, it was more of a hybrid program, but still my education was influenced by faith (being in a Christian program and by my family). And while in that program, I saw my faith personalize. It was no longer what those around me believed but I formed by own thoughts and my own beliefs. I formed my own relationship with God. I went on to study at Liberty University where I furthered my education with a biblical lens. I really think this helps approach conversations in areas that are heavily opposed to faith with an alternative – doing things a better way. What I am learning know is how to “translate” my beliefs and principles in rational statements without using scripture. It seems that whenever you state that something is from the Bible, many become instantly defensive. However, if we can provide a rational argument without using scripture, people will respond better. Later, I can share where I got my reasoning from. It’s all a process. It’s a journey. Thanks, Samuel.

      • #3421
        Iliana Owen-Alcala
        Participant

        Hi Dominique,

        You make many very good points and I really appreciate how you used historic context to further your point. I completely agree. Using faith in foreign policy can only and is only beneficial. Faith really does allow us to understand things better. Without faith, our understanding will certainly be incomplete, and possibility flawed. I think that it is so cool that you had a classical education because I can imagine that that would assist you in deeply comprehending issues as well.

    • #3228
      Samuel Lowry
      Participant

      Besides the fact that I have not paid much attention to foreign policy, I would say that my faith takes precedence when I vote or have an opinion of any policy, beyond that of foreign policy. My faith, my personal relationship with Christ, calls me to have Him as the center of my life and to base decisions on His Word. The Bible provides so much guidance on how we are to live life in pretty much every asset including how we are to engage our neighbors and those of various nations. Using my faith as my lens is always helpful to me, regardless of the pushback that I may receive from people who have a varying belief or are atheist. At the end of the day, I am to be a steward of what God has given me. I was given the right to vote, and I my vote should go towards the policy that is in alignment with biblical principles. And, more so, if there is not a policy that is in alignment, I should use the freedom of speech to voice my concerns and gather around others to push for what is right and what will honor God.

    • #3239
      Sarah Valdez
      Participant

      I have consciously used my faith to examine foreign policy. It was extremely helpful in a way that allowed me to view the world and its workings. I believe it is important to ask for directions and discernment while examining foreign policy because there are many unique situations that are unseen while considering the way that another country runs and functions in its society. It is easy to view people in light of their decisions, for example if someone is stealing then you would view them as thief which is correct, but as a Christian we are called to view them with compassion. We do not condone their actions but we de need to evaluate differently than someone who is a fellow believer. I think it is the same when looking at other countries and there policies, we must pray and ask for guidance while addressing. We can not simply come in with our organizations and plans to try and fix their problems. There needs to be a thorough dive into what we can really do to help.

    • #3420
      Iliana Owen-Alcala
      Participant

      I try to examine all things using my faith because God should be guiding me in every way. It is helpful because I want to look at the issues from a place of love and understanding of all parties. Faith is such a big part of my life that I hope that it comes into play, even subconsciously. As a Christian, I have learned that God should be ruler of all things in our lives. Foreign policy should not be an exception or put limits to where faith should be involved. Faith allows us to understand people and approach things with compassion and wisdom. It cannot be cast aside for the sake of keeping faith out of politics. I honestly do not see how it can bring anything but good things if one is truly faithful. Foreign policy is so important; thus, we need God at the very center of the matter in any case.

    • #3443
      Giancarlo Diaz
      Participant

      A way my faith as a Christian has affected my views in foreign policy is incorporating Just War Theory into my understating when states should go to war. The theory was first formulated by St. Augustine and has been refined over the years. One of the principles needed for jus ad bellum or justification for war is probability of success; I find that I grapple with this qualifier the most when looking at any conflict between states. The more obvious qualifiers of just cause, legitimate authority, and etc. are generally more straight forward to answer. But probability of success presents a more complex qualifier, that a state must ask itself before engaging in conflict can it reasonably achieve its objective through the force of arms. If a state has a just cause to rectify an injustice but cannot reasonably achieve any military objective it is according to the theory, unjustified to go war since the state will merely add to the bloodshed without achieving justice. This qualifier asks states to then be prudent and reasonable with their military objectives and to define them in tangible ways. I believe applying this qualifier to conflicts going on now from the War on Terror to the recent Ukraine War, there is much debate to be had if these conflicts can be considered justified.

    • #3472
      Alex Cevallos
      Participant

      Yes. Joseph, Daniel, and Jesus were are Jews who lived under an empire. Joseph lived under Pharaoh in Egypt, Daniel lived under the King of Ancient Babylon, and Jesus lived under the Roman empire. Each of these men were watched closely by the Ancient Empires.

      Something the account of Joseph teaches me is that God cares about the fate of the world. He gave Joseph a vision that there would be a famine and use Joseph to come up with a way to preserve food and ration it for the people of the Near East to survive a decade. If Joseph were alive today he would be given a Noble Prize in Economics for this incredible achievement. These kinds of circumstances are all around us and if we, American Christians, rely on God’s divine wisdom like Joseph did we can offer solutions to the Near East.

      Daniel. The young and intellectual Hebrew who was enslaved by the King of Ancient Babylon. Daniel was forced to master the law of the Chaldean’s. God blessed Daniel with knowledge and intelligence in the ways of the Chaldean’s. If you read Daniel, he never says, I was intelligent and knowledgeable but rather he says God gave him knowledge and intelligence. Daniel teaches us an important ability when engaging with another peoples culture and laws. If you are going to learn another peoples culture and laws you must do so with excellence. Daniel was so excellent in abiding by the law Babylon that his enemies trick the King to enact a law forbidding Daniel from praying to the God of Israel.

      Jesus. A Jewish man who lived along the Sea of Galilee under the strict watch of Roman forces. One person asked Jesus, “Should we pay taxes to Rome?” Jesus answered, “Give to Cesar what belongs to Cesar and give to God what belongs to God.” Here Jesus is teaching us to honor the government. He is also teaching us that it is ok to engage with foreign nations that do not believe in the God of Israel. Although the Jews in Jerusalem, Judea and Sumeria, and the coast of the Galilee were all Roman citizens Jesus reminded them that his kingdom is not of this world. This means kingdoms/nations come and go but only the kingdom of heaven is eternal. This sentiment is found in Daniel’s vision when he says that the Kingdom on earth will be destroyed by the Kingdom of heaven.

      Not only do I consciously or subconsciously use my faith to examine foreign policy I think I MUST use my faith when examining foreign policy.

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