Do you think the U.S. should assist in mediating negotiations toward a resolution in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict? Why or why not? - Pathfinder

Do you think the U.S. should assist in mediating negotiations toward a resolution in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict? Why or why not?

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    • #1448
      pathfinderlms
      Keymaster
    • #2996

      I do believe the US should assist in mediating negotiations towards a resolution in this conflict, simply because the US is a superpower and has the ability and means to actually make progress in this situation. Without a third party assisting with the mediation, Israel and Palestine will never be able to reach any settlement because of the intense hostility between them, which has gone on for decades. The downside of the mediator being the US, however, is that many individuals see the US as biased towards Israel due to its Christian heritage and the influence that the church has historically had on US politics. This makes it difficult for them to appeal to the Palestinians to reach a peace settlement when the Arabs view the US as a party that will not be seeking their best interests. The challenge here would be for the US to try to come in as an unbiased mediator in order to be successful in the diplomatic process.

      • #3261
        Angel Fierro
        Participant

        Hi Renita,

        I agree with your comments. I think its a good thing ig U.S.A. were to handle negotiations because we are one of the main voices that back them in the U.N.

        I do think it may look unfair but in a world where all other voices are asking for their disapearence, I think we should encourage our policy leaders to voice concern. It is torubling to see current leaders take active actions against them in our Congress.

      • #3262
        Angel Fierro
        Participant

        Hi Renita,

        I agree with your comments. I think its a good thing ig U.S.A. were to handle negotiations because we are one of the main voices that back them in the U.N.

        I do think it may look unfair but in a world where all other voices are asking for their disapearence, I think we should encourage our policy leaders to voice concern. It is torubling to see current leaders take active actions against them in our Congress.

      • #3378
        Samuel Vandeputte
        Participant

        Thank you Renita for your thoughtful response. I wonder what you would view as a solution to the bias-problem. Perhaps the peace process would benefit having two or three external negotiating partners? Perhaps Saudi Arabia as well? Or another global superpower such as China?

      • #3444
        Giancarlo Diaz
        Participant

        I think you’re correct that the United States should help mediate a peace because of it’s statues as a world power it has the ability to broker a peace and potentially put a quicker end to the bloodshed. Also on another note it is in the United States own interest to promote a more peaceful Middle East since this will ensure less disturbances to the global oil trade which the US economy is affected by.

    • #3125
      Oliver Cooper
      Participant

      Looking at the US current status, and its economic and political might in geo-politics. I think the US is best suited to lead any form of mediation in the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict. The United States has all of the relevant instruments at her disposal. It is one of the powerful nations that has never clearly taken a side in the On-going Conflict, this alone guarantees that both nations will equally respect and value a US led Peace Discussions. Moreover America has so much potential to ensure a very positive mediation. It is understandable that things might not be resolved in a day, but a continuous US-led peace talk can lead to a very positive result.

      • #3161
        Hannah Paul
        Participant

        Hi Oliver!

        I really like your point that the U.S. might be the best suited as a third-party mediator in the negotiations between Israel and Palestine. This is undoubtedly due to the fact that we haven’t taken a strong side in the matter, like you stated. I think this process would be a very long one at that, but if all parties are committed to the process, than maybe there is a chance for stability and peace within this conflict. The security risks posed to Israel make this a much harder conflict to find the “right” answer to. Thank you for sharing your thoughts!

      • #3263
        Angel Fierro
        Participant

        I agree with your thoughts on this matter, I do believe America would be a good country to help mediate negotiations. We have seen 6 attempts and have only seen the Palestinian side deny the attempts. If the radicalist movement did not take control of their goverment policy, we would be able to see progress. There is no arab nation that would be able to sit down and mediate without experiencing consequences from other neighboring coutnires. The U.S. however is in a different role that supports it being a good candidate to handle mediations.

      • #3375
        Janae Robinson
        Participant

        Hi Oliver,
        I agree that the United States in probably the best world power to act as a mediator even with the biases we bring to the table. I think of the United Kingdom and how they once controlled the British Mandate. I think that if they tried to act how the United States has that neither side would receive it very well. The previous administration took to a new tactic that produced results and I think that more work on the issue could be done in this manner.

      • #3379
        Samuel Vandeputte
        Participant

        Dear Oliver,

        Thank you for your thoughtful reflection.

        I wonder what you mean by a “continuous US-led peace talk”? What would this look like in practice?

        I could imagine the establishment of a platform initiated by the US to facilitate such talks. That being said, it seems to me it would be difficult to have these talks indefinitely. Also, I think a flaw in such a system could be that the US may lose its credibility (assuming it currently possesses that!) after which the negotiation platform would lose its credibility.

        Curious to hear your thoughts!

      • #3473
        Alex Cevallos
        Participant

        I agree that the U.S. has never officially taken a side in the conflict. The United States has a lot of gifted and talented leaders but as Mead says in his lecture if it were easy a solution would have been offered by now. The United States has tried over and over to bring these parties to the table, but maybe it should simply support the parties. It is possible that ensuring the parties that they are supported equally they will get over the fear and frustration that the United States is taking a side. Now support must be strategic. We know what Palestine has done with aid over the last three or four decades (buy weapons to use against Israel). Therefore, supporting both sides is not as easy as it may seem.

    • #3159
      Hannah Paul
      Participant

      I do think the U.S. should assist in mediating negotiations between the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. I also think the U.S. should approach this conflict in a very careful way. What I mean by that is to not overstep, while also not limiting what the U.S. can provide. I think our assistance depends on who is in power and what administration is doing the mediating. At the end of the day, both the Israelis and the Palestinians need to be willing to come to the table and come ready for potential change before the U.S. can really help with any negotiations. Both sides seem to not see a “peaceful” way out of the conflict. In the past, Israel has been willing to adhere to the resolutions presented but Palestine has refused. The security risks posed to Israel when looking at potential solutions, are a huge area of concern for them. There is another level to the equation and that is the U.S.’s dealings with other countries in the Middle East, like Iran for example. Israel might not want the U.S. at the table if they are making deals with Iran that go against the safety and security of Israel.

      • #3173
        Emily McCray
        Participant

        Hello Hannah,

        Thank you for sharing your insight with us. I particularly found helpful your explanation of the nuances in dealing with this conflict. For example, if the US is to get involved in helping in mediation the other interests we have in the Middle East would need to be clear to both Israelis and Palestinians to form transparency. As you mentioned, on the Israeli side the issue of security is always at the top of the list, and knowing that and other priorities the Palestinians have on the top of their list is paramount in making progress.

      • #3190
        Tanner Hauck
        Participant

        Thank you for your thoughtful response Hannah – I agree that the U.S. does have an opportunity to assist but that they should tread waters lightly. I enjoyed how you framed it saying that they should provide assistance – not impose their will or biases. I also like how you highlight that it’s up to Israel and Palestine to both come to the table willing to find a common solution otherwise U.S. involvement is futile.

      • #3416
        Alexandra Adair
        Participant

        Hey Hannah,

        I loved your comment’s sly reference to the Iranian Nuclear Deal. I think it’s so fitting to include in this conversation at the present time. As you’ve stated, it can be hard for Israel to trust us if they think we’re making deals with their enemies, and the same goes for the enemies of the PA. I believe that the U.S. can never truly be “neutral” as a mediator if it continues relations with other countries that are clearly Pro-Israel or Pro-Palestine.

    • #3171
      Emily McCray
      Participant

      The involvement of the U.S. in mediating negotiations toward a resolution in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict could be an advantage. The first reason is that in conflict resolution having a third-party mediator can be beneficial in obtaining the interest of both parties. For example, as described by the Harvard Law School article entitled What is a Natural Third Party, “When parties are embroiled in a dispute, a neutral third party can help them come to an agreement through alternative dispute resolution methods” (2022). The second reason is that in American culture and the public Israel and Palestine are still important issue that many would like to see addressed. It is sad that in recent years with how our political expressions have been it has weakened the confidence of Jews and Palestinians in the stableness of the U.S. being an ally in the Near East. However, sending over U.S. diplomats and personnel who are knowledgeable, authentic, and committed to peacebuilding could still be an asset for both Israelis and Palestinians.

      • #3254
        Santiago Baron
        Participant

        I agree with you about the neutral third party being a big help in resolving a conflict, the main problem is that the U.S is hardly a neutral third party. The us is always looking to see what beneficiaries them as a country more. So instead of putting the needs of the parties in conflict they side with whoever they can benefit the most from. It will be ideal that they will be a neutral third party, But is really hard to see that happening.

    • #3189
      Tanner Hauck
      Participant

      I think that if the U.S. is asked or invited in mediating negotiations toward a resolution in the Israeli-Palestinian than it should assist however, I don’t believe the U.S. should insert itself in negotiations. It can offer knowledge and resources and recommendations but ultimately a sustainable solution will have to come from Israeli-Palestinian collaboration. I agree with other responses that a neutral third-party mediator is beneficial however, I don’t know if the U.S. can remain neutral and even if it could I don’t think it’s determinations would be viewed as neutral which is arguably just as important. As stated in this course many people believe the U.S. and Israel have always been allies, this myth alone proves that even if the U.S. provided neutral fair mediation assistance many would view their efforts as biased. For this reason I think there is a place for the U.S. to assist but only at the direction of Palestinian and Israeli request.

    • #3210
      Kelen Rojas
      Participant

      Conflicts between nations must be resolved among themselves, the United States has many internal conflicts, as well as to deal with this conflict, generally, when you want to help or mediate in this conflict it is out of interest, but it has not been genuine in my opinion. In addition, Israel will always be based on its constitution, which is the word of God, where all the promises for this people are, the nations of the earth may have different opinions and may try to mediate in this conflict. Still, they will not be able to prevail with the promise of God, and that is why Israel from the beginning faced kingdoms, and empires, to defend the territory that God gave them, so they will not stop insisting on their territory. Sooner or later the Palestinian territory will belong to Israel since it is a promise from God. It is not about whether a nation defends or gives its opinion, this is something beyond human logic.

      • #3253
        Santiago Baron
        Participant

        I really agree, the U.S as to deal with so many things internally, they should not be interfering in other countries problems. But at the same time we can not sit and watch to people kill each other. I think the main problem is not wether to interfere or not but rather in how we do it. Are we as a country trying to help the conflict or just looking to get something out of it.

    • #3243
      Stephanie Vega
      Participant

      I do believe that the United States should help mediate negotiations toward a resolution of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Why? Matthew 5:9 Blessed are the peacemakers, for they will be called children of God. Although the land initially belongs to the Jews, the Palestinians have lived there for some 1,500 – 2,000 years or so. And personally it makes me very sad to think that they live in this conflict of belonging. Both sides definitely need peace, and I think the United States can motivate both parties to come to the negotiating table for an agreement. Both parties would have to yield for peace to reign. How could a peace treaty be seen between them? The truth is that it is difficult for us in the east to stipulate this, but I believe that among themselves those who have lived their history can reach an agreement. I say all this from a Christian point of view and believing that they can have peace.

      • #3415
        Alexandra Adair
        Participant

        Hey Stephanie,

        I think your argument is sound and I like the hope that you have. However, I’ve always interpreted that verse from the Beatitudes a bit differently. I’ve always thought of a peacemaker as the person WITHIN the argument that argues for peace and chooses not to fight. You’ve taken a more general look and thought of a peacekeeper as someone from the outside who has to step in and stop a fight. This would make the understanding of the Word of God a little bit more challenging when applying it to this situation.

    • #3252
      Santiago Baron
      Participant

      I think the US should try to help and assist in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict in a way that you are not looking for your own benefit. The problem with the U.S. is that tries to mediate always looking at an angle of what I can get out of this conflict, The U.S. needs to help mediate as a neutral party not trying to see what they can gain out of it but rather focusing on what is best for the Israelites and Palestines, they need to focus on the needs of the people that are in the conflict. We need to be objective and look at the best posible outcome for everyone involved in the conflict. The U.S. foreign policy always has an angle and bias. If we are trying to help resolve a problem we need o put the needs of the people before our own, and the heart of the conflict is not the U.S. is te people in the near east dying because te big powers are seeing what they can get out of it.

      • #3445
        Giancarlo Diaz
        Participant

        I don’t believe there’s anything inherently wrong about the US having a bias towards itself when it engages in diplomacy with other nations, in fact I think it’s the duty of the United States to conduct all it’s policy in mind of how it will benefits it’s own people. But that said there’s no reason why this bias can’t coalesces with the interest of the people in Israel and Palestine. I believe it’s beneficial to the United States to prompt peace between Israel and Palestine since conflict could be detrimental to it’s other interest in the region.

    • #3264
      Angel Fierro
      Participant

      I believe the United States would be a good candidate to help assist in mediating negotiations for a resolution. There is no other Arab nation that will help mediate without consequences if the negotiations are too favorable for the nation of Israel.

      I admire how certain policy leaders have spoken for Israel and I believe that if we had a leader similar to Obama, then i would not believe the United States would be a good candidate for negotiations. It depends on who is leading our country and their team. If there is a Leader like him, who left our country and the world at total risk like they did with the Iran deal. I would hope we would not be in the room helping mediate. I am grateful for the time President Trump was in office, we saw many positive changes in the american voice on the topic of Israel. We even saw the true natures and opinions of some congressional officials. I think really the answer to the question above depends on who is the sitting president and who is on their team.

    • #3374
      Janae Robinson
      Participant

      I think that the United States should assist in mediating negotiations toward a resolution in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict for a few reasons. The first is that, like it or not, we are seen as the most powerful country on Earth. This means that as every country makes decisions, they are making their choices based on us. With that being said, my next reason is that if we are the most powerful, we should be involved foreign policy to shape decisions in what we think is in our and the world’s best interest. Third, most of the world’s Jews live in the United States. If we are serious about stopping antisemitism, then we should want a seat at the table to protect American Jews and their right to access the Holy Land. Fourth and finally, Israel is the only democracy in the region. We should support this type of government in part to show that we disapprove with the human rights violations that are common in other countries in the Middle East. While I think that we should have a seat at the table in these negotiations, it is up to the Israelis and Palestinians to decide how they want to live together in the region.

    • #3377
      Samuel Vandeputte
      Participant

      I think the U.S. should assist in mediating negotiations toward a resolution in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

      The basic premise for my argument is that with great power comes great responsibility. The US, as a matter of fact, is the most powerful nation in the world and must wield this power wisely. In the case of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, I think the US also has a role to play. In particular as the US clearly takes both Israeli and Palestinian interests to heart and because of the US’s general influence in the region in forging alliances.

      The US needs to be careful, though, not to impose its own interests on the Israeli or Palestinian sides. I think that the Western, Eurocentric focus on getting a solution has been one of biggest obstacles to peace. Maybe there is no solution! And that is fine. Maybe we should focus on marginal improvements that can lead to more peace in the long run.

    • #3414
      Alexandra Adair
      Participant

      I do not think the U.S. should assist in mediating negotiations toward a resolution in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. I do think that there should be a mediator, I just don’t think the U.S. is best suited to do it. This is because I believe in two opposite types of mediators. The first is a mediator with no “skin in the game” or conflicting biases, and the second is a mediator with deep knowledge and understanding of both sides of the issue. The U.S. is neither of those types of mediators. I think that the U.S. would ultimately be ineffective in mediation because they have “skin in the game”/conflicting biases and because they don’t know or understand the issues as a strong mediator should. As the lecture talks about, there is still this belief that Americans can just take American values and systems and create more democracies, as if the Americans are the source of wisdom, and that belief can especially be an obstacle to the negotiation of a resolution.

    • #3475
      David Ndayishimiye
      Participant

      I think that the U.S. Should assist in mediating negotiations toward a resolution in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. I understand that the U.S. is very much capable if the Middle East truly desires reconciliation. However, we’ve seen that the U.S. has tried multiple times including the time when President Clinton journeyed to Israel and spend two weeks in talks with all the leaders. Although much effort was put into the talks, the results weren’t sufficient. One thing that I’ve realized is that the problem here might not be the leaders of some countries in the Middle East, but the belief and systems, and organizations that have refused to budge. I believe that with the right approach, the U.S. should and can bring peace and stability to the Middle East.

    • #2615
      Denise DeVatt
      Participant

      Dan,
      I agree with you! The problems that face the US through PA corruption, Hamas, and Israel settlers is a large driving force behind the intractability of the conflict. I also strongly agree that any pushes for peace from the United States wouldn’t be fruitful unless all sides hope for peace as well. When the US does get involved with states that want peace with Israel (Abraham Accords), it works out for all!
      I want to add one more thing that you can think about as well as everything else that you mentioned; the United States has a very limited understanding of the water conflict in the region as we face no such thing here, and I think that until we take into account that water allocation is mentioned in almost every peace deal that Israel reaches, we are just going to be spinning ourselves into circles. There will be no peace in the region until water allocation is agreed upon first. Thanks for sharing!

    • #3174
      Emily McCray
      Participant

      Hello Dan,

      Well done, in explaining the situation as it currently stands. I feel the same, in that there seems to be a lot of potential for positive US involvement. However, this can be shot down if both Israelis and Palestinians are unwilling to give a little in the negotiation process. On the other hand, having expert cultural personnel helping US diplomats is essential. Both Israeli and Palestinian cultures approach negotiation and agreements differently than Americans or ever say Westerners do.

    • #2751
      Mitchell Schwab
      Participant

      I think yes and no to this question. It depends on the current leadership and the foreign policy application at the time of mediation. It seems that the mediation technique changes every 2-4 years and is dependent on the political pendulum. I feel the United States has the potential to mediate in the most powerful way, but I do not trust our leaders to mediate in the right way. It seems that for every zionist there are three anti-semites waiting to pounce at the first discussion about Israeli-Palestinian relations.

    • #3126
      Oliver Cooper
      Participant

      Hi Mitchell, I do agree with you that there will always be diverse opinions and sides in any form of mediation, but I do not think that should be a reason why the US shouldn’t lead/assist this change. Like you said the US has the potential to ensure a positive mediation, as such I think it is quite agreeable that she is best suited to assist in a Israeli-Palestinian Peace talk.

    • #3476
      David Ndayishimiye
      Participant

      I agree with your point. However, the situation always escalates independent of whether the U.S. is there or not. In this case, I believe that with the power that our nation has, they are most likely going to survive the backlash and put things in order. Apart from this, a third person is always important. Therefore, stabilizing the Middle East is almost impossible without the interference of a greater nation. On the other hand, it could be difficult for the U.S. to solve the issue because the issues that we should deal with might not be the right ones. With the strength that the opposers of unity in the Middle East have and the magnitude of their wrong perception of the situation, it’s definitely not going to be easy.

    • #3127
      Oliver Cooper
      Participant

      Hi Gabriel, thanks for the write-up. I do agree with you that the US powerful instruments that they could leverage in a mediation, unlike other countries, as such she’s best suited to assist in any form of mediation.

    • #3160
      Hannah Paul
      Participant

      Hi Gabriel!

      I agree that creating a resolution that will solve the Israeli-Palestinian conflict will not occur within one administration. This conflict has been going on for a very long time and no resolution will disregard that fact. I agree that mediating negotiations help to bring stability. Each time a negotiation occurs, even if it is only for a small amount of time, they are chipping away the hostility and getting closer and closer to peace. Thank you for sharing your thoughts!

    • #3191
      Tanner Hauck
      Participant

      Hi Gabriel, I appreciate your response and agree that mediating negotiations is key for bringing stability and peace to a volatile region. I also agree that since the U.S. has a lot of vested interests in Israel it should play a diplomacy role in the security and peace of this part of the world. However, I don’t know how they are suited to help negotiate on this particular topic. As you mention they need to stop flip flopping as it makes them lose creditability. The issue is complex and nuanced meaning it will not be solved in one presidential administration – even if an order or treaty is signed it will still takes years to be practiced as written on paper.

    • #3376
      Janae Robinson
      Participant

      Hi Gabriel,
      I agree that Israel needs to stop flip flopping on this issue. The different goals that each administration tries to broadcast do not help to create stability in the region. For our security and the security of the Near East we should definitely try to be involved where ever possible in peace negotiations. The United States has great political power that can be used for the right reasons in this negotiation process to bring peace and stability to the region.

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