After taking this course, in your own words, please define Hebraic leadership and what it means to you. - Pathfinder

After taking this course, in your own words, please define Hebraic leadership and what it means to you.

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    • #1600
      pathfinderlms
      Keymaster

      After taking this course, in your own words, please define Hebraic leadership and what it means to you.

    • #2585
      BANZA MUKALAY
      Participant

      Hebraic leadership is to lead people behind you in midst of wilderness but knowing where you come from and where you going, understand the difference between Christianity and church helping the church to know what is missed today, the kingdom of God is the main gospel that church should be aware of and that is Jerusalem the kingdom on earth this is the Hebraic leader must know and preach. The church should know and understand the destiny is not the heaven but the kingdom of God that why Jesus said seek first the kingdom of God and his righteousness.. Hebraic Leader is some on who knows how to use his or her word in midsts of conflict and never give up no matter situation, Daniel and Esther where in exile but they new where they where and where they came from. Hebraic leadership wake me up now I understand that even your are a leader you have to be humble and to take responsibility to teach people to know they destination which means we are taking people from point A to point B I really understand the near east is so important in my belief. The last thing is that Hebraic leader walk by faith but not by sight.

      • #2729
        Shawrath Anthony
        Participant

        Hey Banza,
        I really appreciate how you covered so much ground in your post, briefly highlighting on many aspects that make a Hebraic leader. I like how you stressed the need to be humble and remember where you come from because humility is a key component of a hebraic leader. Lastly I really appreciate how you also stressed the need for being a person that walks by faith and not by sight.
        thank you for your post

      • #2882
        Austin Pellizzer
        Participant

        Hello Banza,
        I like your comment on the idea of leading amid wilderness and knowing where you come from and where you are going. I think this is such an essential aspect of today’s world. Many of today’s leaders intentionally or unintentionally leave behind their roots of where they came from to fulfill the position’s duty, in many cases losing touch with their upbringing and, as a result, their values. However, a true Christian leader can uphold the responsibilities of said leadership position while simultaneously practising and keeping in mind the fundamental values they hold near and dear to them, which made them the person they are today.

    • #2605
      Chantel Barnard
      Participant

      The Hebraic leadership is a blueprint map of cosmology:teaching and training humble Semitic Christian leaders- world navigation in exiled deployment.

      Hebraic Leadership is centered on seeking first the Kingdom of God (righteousness, peace, and joy in the Holy Spirit) and His righteousness. Seeking the tangible place- New Jerusalem, God’s will be done and His kingdom come on earth as it is in heaven. As a friend of God and a friend of man: It is to leave native country, to embark on a journey of faith,responding to the call of God (forsaking all). To journey the Way to the Kingdom and undergo the process of becoming.

      A time-based leadership: understanding the origin, destination and fellow comrades oriented towards Jerusalem with biblical sight; honing the skill of clarity and wisdom founded on the fear of God, YHWH,and His Word. Deployment is crisis focused to confront chaos,leading people through it; beginning in one’s own community into the Near East. To go ahead, braving danger and confusion; guided by encouragement in God’s Word through conflict.

      It is to be a student of the Near East and beyond the Near East to discern: one’s individual path (faith journey) in this world and encounter faith for everyone in revelation of God in a shared mission- historically, culturally and spiritually. Relating in a mutually dynamic heart with the Near East: to help and be helped.

      Hebraic Leadership is the application of the five pillars of the Hebraic tradition:
      1. Deity,
      2. Personality,
      3. History,
      4. Plurality, and
      5. Responsibility
      To navigate duality in history and in oneself before God’s eyes. Hebraic Leadership is tangible, the leader is: someone others want to follow, who gets others where they need to go, who makes good (godly) decisions,who receives timely direction, a unique responder, a conductor of self and others in God’s presence and power. To be a disciple: A student and vehicle of influence of God’s Word.

      Leadership prioritizing one’s personal relationship with God. Practicing the sabbath, praying and fasting to seek the baseline to see the world truly and to return to service. Ministry (to change hearts and minds), promoting Redemption and embracing politics as a gift from God using tools appropriately. To trust and take heart in God who holds the future and His sovereignty over it all, whilst affirming one’s own responsibility.

      • #2654
        Nathan Alvarez
        Participant

        Hi Chantel,
        I really appreciate your emphasis on the Kingdom of God–how Hebraic leadership focuses itself on the kingdom that is not yet here, in a sense. For if leadership is that–leading oneself and others to a destination–what can be better than leading to the Kingdom of God, a kingdom marked by peace, order, and true justice? In this sense you are exactly correct that a true leader–a Hebraic leader–identifies those virtues that have not yet been attained but unremittingly commits themselves to their end.

      • #2728
        Shawrath Anthony
        Participant

        Hi Chantel,
        I really love the connection you drew between seeking the Kingdom of God and stepping out in faith and thereby becoming who God has Called us to be, which you phrased as “the journey of becoming”
        I think it’s so important in our christian walks to understand that while God is calling us to do great things, it also requires obedience and faith to step out and do the things he is asking is us to do.
        Your post spoke to me

      • #2762
        Samuel Vandeputte
        Participant

        Hi Chantal,

        Thank you for your robust overview. I like your structured response and in particular that you started with the overarching vision that drives a Hebraic leader, after which you explained what this means in practice.

        I would be curious to hear more about how you experience this journey as a Hebraic leader yourself. How do you find the combination of leading others whilst following God? How do you link your vocational mission to the Near East?

        Cheers,
        Samuel

      • #2945

        Hi Chantel,

        Great recap! I liked this line, “Practicing the sabbath, praying and fasting to seek the baseline to see the world truly and to return to service.” One of my favorite books is The Sabbath by Abraham Joshua Heschel. As I see it, the Sabbath is where Deity, Personality, History, Plurality, and Responsibility all come together. I wonder what your thoughts are on the Sabbath from a Christian point of view? Do we treat it as we should?

        Thanks!

        JCK

    • #2652
      Nathan Alvarez
      Participant

      Hebraic leadership is the process by which we, as Christians, as a Church, as a people of common ancestry, and as a global community, achieve true justice through a common orientation toward God and His Kingdom. The achievement of Hebraic leadership has both individual and macro-level goals; by emphasizing the duality of man as living within one world but for another, Hebraic leadership has a uniquely spiritual gaze that emphasizes man’s true nature. Hebraic leadership is also, in many ways, a partnership–one that seeks communion with our fellow man for both our benefits. In this way, Hebraic leadership takes on a dimension of humility, for if a true leader seeks communion with another, they must first acknowledge where they themselves can grow and recognize where true authority resides–in God Himself.

      • #2928
        Oliver Cooper
        Participant

        Hi Nathan, thanks for this insightful write-up of what a Hebraic Leadership entails. I really like how you mentioned the significance of Hebraic Leadership to oneself (individual), and our global environment (macro-level). Looking at the concept of Hebraic Leadership, I think the world would be quite a better place if all Christians adhere to these leadership principles. Furthermore, this will enhance the Great Commission of our Lord, ie. the spread of the Gospel, and the expansion of God’s work on earth.

      • #3270
        Cade Coffee
        Participant

        Hey Nathan, I really appreciated your response and in particular the emphasis on that relational aspect of Hebraic leadership. It’s so important for us to remain in community with others if we hope to continue growing ourselves – acknowledging even that God, being triune, is himself a relational God and created us in his image. I also touched on the idea that being a Hebraic leader requires humility and the ability to continually learn from others. Great response!

    • #2655

      To me, there is one key defining element that sets a Hebraic leader apart from a regular leader – their compass. A Hebraic leader looks to God for guidance at all times and every decision they make is influenced by their faith. A Hebraic leader looks to the character of God as an example to follow. God’s compassion, His selflessness, His love, His mercy and His faithfulness are all virtues that a Hebraic leader seeks to embody. Moreover, a Hebraic leader understands that God gave us free will and as they seek to emulate His leadership, a Hebraic leader believes in providing their followers with choices. A Hebraic leader will clearly articulate to their followers what is right and wrong, but they will never force any of them to make the right decision as this impedes on their free will. In order to provide guidance to their followers, a Hebraic leader needs to have an in-depth understanding of their own history, which is laid out in God’s word. They also need to know how to hear God’s voice as ultimately, they will need to seek His guidance as they navigate the chaos of this world and make tough decisions.

      • #2763
        Samuel Vandeputte
        Participant

        Dear Renita,

        Thank you for this thoughtful reflection. Your emphasis on free will is interesting, embedded in a moral framework that steers those under your leadership.

        Another interesting point -which you mention sets the Hebraic leader apart- is the compass that drives the Hebraic leader. I agree with you that we should look to God’s exemplary character. I do wonder, however, how you do that? How do you translate God’s virtues into leadership in concrete and tangible ways?

        Cheers,
        Samuel

      • #2792
        Arielle Del Turco
        Participant

        Hi Renita,

        I love the point you made! A clear vision is important for any leader. How else can he or she guide others? The Hebraic leader focuses on God and looks to scripture for guidance and wisdom. It is only when we are filled with God’s Word that we will have the confidence to make hard decisions and lead others as we navigate the confusion of this world.

      • #2837
        Jamila White
        Participant

        Renita,

        I love that you pointed out that a Hebraic leader looks to the character of God. This is certainly true. We cannot base our morality on anyone else other than the One who is just, good, and true. The world is in need of Hebraic leaders who are willing and desiring to exhibit the character of God. This alone will go a long way in influencing others. I greatly appreciate you pointing out the importance of a Hebraic leader understanding their own history. Awareness of past times and awareness of one’s identity is crucial. How can we lead if we are ignorant of the basics? Great post!

        Jamila

    • #2671
      Evan Crain
      Participant

      The chapters of metanarrative of the Bible, as commonly described, are Creation, Fall, Redemption, Restoration. Hebraic leadership is a “four chapter” framework for those endowed by God the gift and purpose of leadership. Western missiology and many Christian organizations often fall into a “two chapter” trap: they emphasize sin and salvation, particularly personal, but neglect our collective origin and destination. Hebraic leadership, as stated in the course, emphasizes a historical foundation for Christian leaders beginning with remembering the past events shaping today, our roles in the continuation of a linear path, and the path’s ultimate fulfillment in a literal Kingdom.

      After stumbling upon the Philos Project through a friend, I’m amazed to find the Pathfinder course expresses my deepest motivations and intentions. I raised myself on hero literature from a Hebraic leader worldview, reading historical fiction of young men who were forced from home by an evil, encountered hardship and yet rose in administrative power in exile, similarly as Joseph and Daniel, returning home eventually to right the original injustice (Byzantium by Lawhead a prime example). Personally, I couldn’t finish college fast enough, getting my piece of paper at 20 so as to get out into the world and learn to lead. 9 years later with a career around the world designed intentionally as a “statesman in training,” I’m shocked to find the Pathfinder course so uniquely expressing, expanding, and progressing a deep felt calling that began in childhood – even encouraging some to pursue statesmanship! I have often felt alone or an oddity because of my intentionality and I am encouraged to find a community of leaders who feel the same calling for their lives, grounded with the support of education and mentors to mature that intentionality.

    • #2727
      Shawrath Anthony
      Participant

      After taking this course, I’ve come to understand Hebraic leadership as servant leadership whose model is the same as the model of Jesus leadership. It is a leadership style that is both humble and confident, meek and just but most importantly is a leadership model that is lead by the spirit of God.

      A Hebraic leader seeks to influence his environment with his gifts and talents to advance the kingdom of God (the church). This is always the Hebraic leaders end goal.

      A Hebraic leader promotes redemption and the message of Jesus because he understands that this is a fallen world and needs God; in the the pursuit of bringing God to his area of influence, he also seeks for the betterment of the lives of people and engages in rebuilding societies and cultures, hopes and dreams. A Hebraic leader is one that is driven by a God given vision and is fervent in seeing that come to pass.

      • #2779
        Ariel Fierro
        Participant

        I admire the comparison of Hebraic leadership teaching to Jesus’ teaching – humble and confident to be led by the spirit. The main priority of Hebraic leadership is to stand firm in God’s word but not lose sight of gaining people to join in the first place. The use of talents and gifts to advance the kingdom of God can be used to guide new souls to the Lord and create another step for them to gain Hebraic leadership.

      • #3172
        Emmanuel S. Wesley
        Participant

        Hello Shawrath;

        I agreed with you. Hebraic leadership is a servant-style kind of leadership. This kind of leadership requires you to be both humble and confident. It also requires you to seek and find a way of navigation. With all this, the Hebraic leader must take risks and make decisions and answer to whatever the results of those decisions may be. I will also agree that Hebraic leadership promotes redemption. A Hebraic leader is someone who finds and leads the way.

        Thanks,
        Emmanuel

    • #2761
      Samuel Vandeputte
      Participant

      Hebraic leadership starts with the eschatological positioning of ourselves in the “here but not yet”. We are in a reality where the Kingdom is present, but not fulfilled. We are, however, not supposed to passively await the coming of Christ. Instead, we should seek the welfare of the city, in whatever area we are called towards. If you are prone to being able to deal with power, for example, your calling is probably in the area of politics. A Hebraic leader never loses track of the bigger picture. His loyalties primarily lie with the Kingdom, which is both physical and spiritual. His focus is on Jerusalem. To me, Hebraic leadership an important lens to look at reality through. It positions us within the grand scheme of things, giving meaning, and translates the truth of the gospel into concrete, everyday action. The Hebraic worldview thus offers the orthodox paradigm for those belonging to the body of Christ.

      • #2778
        Ariel Fierro
        Participant

        I like how you automatically stated the start of Hebraic leadership, “here but not yet.” In addition to the reality of not passively awaiting the coming of Christ. I agree with the stance of Hebraic leaders’ call to action to gain souls as they are attentively seeking the word of God to stay within their image and not be tempted of the world’s ways. The focuses are very simple but can be taken off course and that is where knowing the position we are in will be essential.

      • #2794
        Dominique Hoffman
        Participant

        Hi Samuel! I really like how you address how the Hebraic leaders is operating in the present yet awaiting God and making decisions that constantly point towards the new Jerusalem. Our role as Hebraic leaders is to actively participate in the events that point to the Second Coming. All of history is moving towards that moment and the Hebraic leader operates in that authority, perspective, and worldview which informs all aspects of leadership. As you mentioned, the Hebraic leader never loses track of the bigger picture.

    • #2777
      Ariel Fierro
      Participant

      Hebraic leadership thinks historically and views the world through a biblical lens, but keeping in mind to have the perspective of Jesus Christ.

      Hebraic leadership means to me that one is not trying to be solely the image of God but to see through Jesus’ eyes. How to navigate through two realms – the earth and the spiritual. Additionally, continue on the path of Hebraic tradition. Growing up, we are taught that natural-born leaders have confidence, have the “right walk,” and so forth. However, Hebraic leaders have those traits and understand the history of something half hidden and half revealed. Within this, they must account for being responsible for their surroundings and affirming God’s sovereignty over it all. Hebraic leaders must dive into understanding and walk in the word of God to teach those around them. This creates an image of what we, as Christians, must entail. If we are to be called Christians but not know the roots of where the belief originated from and not create a faithful path for others to follow, how are we Christians and even so Hebraic Leaders?

    • #2783
      Audra Jones
      Participant

      Upon finishing this course, I found that Hebraic leadership is not simply defined. It is multi-faceted and revolves around recognizing the sovereignty of God. Hebraic leadership centers on knowing the will of God and how to honor Him, while in leadership or trying to be a leader. It requires a Christian leader to pivot his or her viewpoint to the origin of Christianity, Jerusalem because a leader is a follower of the living Christ for the Kingdom of God. Christ walked among the people and humbled Himself as the savior of mankind. A leader in the Hebraic form is someone who exhibits that same type of humility as he or she becomes a part of the community that he or she is trying to lead. This type of leader understands and lives amongst the people and tries to be like Christ in leadership through Jesus’s eyes. This is not only what I believe the definition of what Hebraic leadership is but also what it means to me. It means that a leader is a servant like Christ to the people and to foremostly to God.

      • #2897
        Devin Humphreys
        Participant

        Audra, I found it insightful that you’ve begun this response by grounding Hebraic leadership in first principles, and more specifically in the sovereignty of God. More generally, I also agree with you that servant leadership is an important aspect of the Hebraic worldview. However, I would also encourage you to more fully consider the idea that there are a multitude of paths to Hebraic leadership. It seems almost counterintuitive to assert that a leadership model grounded in our Christian identity would not always point back precisely to Christ, but I think one of the strengths of the model of Hebraic leadership is how it is able to adapt our Christian worldview to the circumstances in which we find ourselves (certainly different from the circumstances at the time of Jesus’s being on earth!).

    • #2786
      Audra Jones
      Participant

      Upon finishing this course, I found that Hebraic leadership is not simply defined. It is multi-faceted and revolves around recognizing the sovereignty of God. Hebraic leadership centers on knowing the will of God and how to honor Him, while in leadership or trying to be a leader. It requires a Christian leader to pivot his or her viewpoint to the origin of Christianity, Jerusalem because a leader is a follower of the living Christ for the Kingdom of God. Christ walked among the people and humbled Himself as the savior of mankind. A leader in the Hebraic form is someone who exhibits that same type of humility as he or she becomes a part of the community that he or she is trying to lead. This type of leader understands and lives amongst the people and tries to be like Christ in leadership through Jesus’s eyes. This is not only what I believe the definition of what Hebraic leadership is but also what it means to me. It means that a leader is a servant like Christ to the people and to foremostly to God.

      • #3022
        Benjamin Comire
        Participant

        Thank you for sharing, Audra! I wholeheartedly agree that Hebraic leadership involves serving in humility amidst the people as Christ did. Too often, we get lost in our lives and wonder what the most important priorities of faith are when they sometimes stare us in the face with Christ’s example in the Gospels. We have to reorient ourselves to Jerusalem and the Near East, and in doing so we will come home to the place where we belong in God’s Kingdom.

    • #2790
      Arielle Del Turco
      Participant

      After taking this course, I understand Hebraic leadership to describe leaders who follow God, focusing on His Kingdom, and lead others with wisdom, hope, and a servant’s heart. Adopting the characteristics of a Hebraic leader will set us up to embrace the Christian faith as a path that we walk, much like the way Jesus viewed it. A Hebraic leader is anchored in the Word of God and makes difficult decisions with humility. Hebraic leadership does not shy away from complexities and paradoxes. Humanity at large—and the nuanced issues at play in the Near East that interest many of us taking this course—is too complicated to boil down to a simplistic narrative. Hebraic leaders can be comfortable with plurality and make room for a wide variety of beliefs and opinions even as we hold to a transcendent truth, rooted in the Bible. This perspective makes it easier to understand and respect those from different faiths and backgrounds and constructively engage with the Near East.

      • #2795
        Dominique Hoffman
        Participant

        Hi Arielle,
        I really like how you observed that the way of the Hebraic leader and how the worldview sets Christian leaders apart from other non-Christian leaders. Humility is a hallmark characteristic of the Hebraic leaders, a virtue Jesus exhibited on during his time on earth and in His own ministry. I like how you noted a Hebraic leader, in the preset of upholding righteousness, does not shy away from complexities or paradoxes. This leads to the ability to operate in the physical realm here on earth, pursuing plurality and peace even with leaders and people from other cultures and beliefs.

    • #2793
      Dominique Hoffman
      Participant

      Perhaps one of the biggest takeaways from this course for me was the conviction of taking the hope I currently place in Washington D.C. and placing it on Jerusalem and the day of the New Jerusalem. Working in politics I often find it hard to not assemble into worldly ideological factions or place my hope in the policies around me. As we await the kingdom to come the Lord also calls us to roles of leadership, and for those of us who feel called to manage power to achieve proximate justice our roles in politics should be governed by an eternal and historic mindset discerning the Spirit in an attempt to manage and achieve peace in crisis. Working in government is essentially the job of managing crises with the objective of averting conflict if not to achieve peace. Understanding the bodily and spiritual factors involved in conflict domestically or internationally requires the Hebraic leader to understand that the decisions they make operate along a much longer history and time, rather than current space. The Hebraic map emphasizes history, viewing the world as a state of becoming and always moving forward. Politics is really all events moving towards the New Jerusalem. As a Christian leader it is my job to make decisions at forks in the road that discern history and the Word rather than relying on my own knowledge or intuition. I am drawn to this course because of the emphasis of hebric leadership in crisis. As a leader, I want to understand the two worlds I walk in and how this duality should inform my decision in political life. This question is a little tricky for me, working in international policy research, my neighborhood is international and vast. The work I am involved with is directly related to conflict and like Abrbaham I want to seek when to advise words and power. I believe the best way to be a Hebraic leader is to follow the five pillars outlined in this course, specifically the one tangible way I want to challenge myself to understand responsibility and be the living link between heaven and earth. In my line of work, I encounter people who do not love the Lord or view history in the same way I do. I want to see this as an opportunity and to fill in the gaps of where Hebreaic leadership is absent. It is my responsibility and understanding responsibility as I research and advise large cooperation and sovereign nations is one way I can exhibit Hebraic leadership.

      • #2836
        Jamila White
        Participant

        Dominique,

        I appreciate that you brought out that your decisions should be based on the word of God rather than human knowledge. Our knowledge is finite (cf. Ps. 147:5). I appreciate your heart for desiring to lead people morally and with great respect to the responsibility this position calls for. I also made note you mentioned the eternal and historic mindset that should always be before a Hebraic leader. I agree completely. Although we are in the present, we are to be mindful of both past times and the eternity that awaits us. Only God can help us operate in such a manner for He himself is eternal and is timeless. I understand this question may be a struggle to answer, however, I believe that God is the one who can help us wisely navigate these issues for His plan has been established since the foundations of the world.

        Jamila

      • #3490
        Kari McDowell
        Participant

        So sorry, Dominique, I am having trouble getting the reply function to work, so I may have replied to you with my own reply to the prompt. 🙂

        But, I so appreciate your perspective here. As I said in my response, I have heard so much political content in the church which does not take the Hebraic worldview into account. I so respect your desire to use statesmanship well, not to advance the selfish desires of any particular person or group, but to truly seek the common good and to pursue peace here and around the world. It must be very challenging work, but it is so worthwhile! May God bless you as you pursue His calling for your life!

    • #2834
      Jamila White
      Participant

      In order to understand Hebraic leadership, one must first understand leadership. I would define leadership as someone that helps navigate others to the final destination, ensuring that maturity and wisdom is executed in the midst of life’s twists and turns. I liken the definition of leadership to what a GPS does for us today. When we use a GPS, we are relying on that system to help get us to the destination. This course pointed out that perhaps the most essential for a leader, particularly a Hebraic leader, is “Where am I going?” An Hebraic leader has a biblical worldview and humbly submits to God as a vessel to be used. Hebraic leadership entails clarity of the vision and purpose of their journey as well as applying wisdom to ensure biblical informed decisions are made. Hebraic leadership involves one having a listening ear to the instructions of God. In order to have a listening and willing ear, the Hebraic leader must have humility. This is how I would define Hebraic leadership and what this form of leadership means to me personally.

    • #2852
      Sarah Victor
      Participant

      I think it means that you keep moving forward, courageously having a hope and vision for the future despite the tragedies and chaos around you. I think it is important to keep believing in our intrinsic worth and spend time figuring out what gift we have to share with others. We build our energy and talents by serving others in small ways wherever we may be at the moment, with resources, ideas, and talent. Sometimes as a pioneer we have to find new ways to get where we are going, but keeping humility, creativity, and service in mind will remind us of our purpose. We should not let the lack of evident answers prevent us from forging ahead, growing both from the advice of counselors whom we trust to learn from as well as friends with whom we mutually share our burdens.

      • #2888
        Emily McCray
        Participant

        Hello Sarah,

        The way you described a leader as one who forges ahead despite difficulties is so powerful. To be confident in the gifts and abilities God has given us and to use them for His glory is the main goal. Also, I agree with your advice to seek out counselors and friends to share in one’s journey. This allows one to not feel alone in the call or task God has revealed to them. For example, I recall God bringing people into my life at the right time when I needed encouragement also well.

    • #2854
      Gabrielle Nobles
      Participant

      Hebraic leadership follows a Kingdom attitude while acknowledging and appreciating the humanistic realities of the world we live in. A hebraic leader will address a problem from a biblical centered perspective, and examine the history, culture, and society in which the dispute arises.They have a close relationship with God and with their church community, which allows them to develop the aptitude and empathy required to understand groups of people while  keeping their own self-centered views to a minimum.One takes action by engaging wherever they are, both within their local communities and on a worldwide scale.The core of Hebraic leadership resides in being both a leader and an active follower. Hebraic leaders maintain an open mind and humility in knowing that they do not know everything, but are eager to learn holistically in order to address crises in the best way possible.They research individuals from the Bible and use Jesus Christ as a foundation for interacting with both the problem and the people involved. Hebraic leaders recognize the Holy Spirit’s power, position, and function in their lives and allow Him to guide them in all situations.

    • #2856
      Gabrielle Nobles
      Participant

      Hey Chantel,

      You have such a strong perspective of what Hebraic leadership entails, and I absolutely agree with you. I liked how you emphasized that Hebraic leadership “is to be a student of the Near East and to discern beyond the Near East…” In order to be a leader, we must first become followers. That involves taking the time to learn about the Near East’s politics, culture, society, and spirituality before acting. Then we utilize our spiritual journey to make wise judgments about how to respond to various situations.

    • #2857
      Gabrielle Nobles
      Participant

      Hey Chantel,

      You have such a strong perspective of what Hebraic leadership entails, and I absolutely agree with you. I liked how you emphasized that Hebraic leadership “is to be a student of the Near East and to discern beyond the Near East…” In order to be a leader, we must first become followers. That involves taking the time to learn about the Near East’s politics, culture, society, and spirituality before acting. Then we utilize our spiritual journey to make wise judgments about how to respond to various situations.

    • #2858
      Gabrielle Nobles
      Participant

      Hi Renita,

      You have such a insightful and thought provoking point of view. You captured my attention by stating that a Hebraic leader first seek the character and personality of God and understands that God has given us free will and we can guide others, but can’t force them because we all have the freedom of choice. I believe that this is an essential outlook as a Hebraic leader. We should communicate with other and not force our perspective and beliefs onto them. They have the freedom (God has given us) to choose their own course in life. That, to me, exemplifies the duality and respect that Hebraic leaders should have.

    • #2865
      Victoria Franklin
      Participant

      After taking this course, I would define Hebraic leadership as a way of leading with the foundation of a Biblical worldview. To me this means using the moral codes of the Bible and the leaders of the Bible as guides and examples of how to be a leader. This means wielding power not just for the sake of wielding power, but using that authority for good and to glorify God. The Hebraic leader has to accept that politics are a gift from God, so he must wield some coercive power in exercising this gift. In having this Biblical worldview, the Hebraic leader must lead both as an individual and as a member of the larger body of God’s children. This also keeps the Hebraic leader humble; he is not almighty and singular as God is, and him being a member of God’s children reminds him that he is guiding them and himself to God’s Kingdom.

      • #2887
        Emily McCray
        Participant

        Hello Victoria,

        Well done on your post. The insight you got on how the Hebraic leader is one that uses Biblical leaders as guides is spot on. I enjoyed the example the course gave on how Abraham the father of our faith as one who knew when to use words and actions to solve an issue. This is something that all leaders experience. For example, when to talk to an employee about their attitude at work or when to fire someone based on them creating a toxic atmosphere.

    • #2886
      Emily McCray
      Participant

      This course was very insightful. The breakdown of the different worldview maps of Barbaric, Hellenistic, and Hebraic was helpful in understanding the world we live in and people’s perspectives. Each person acts out their life based on core truths and stories they believe about reality. The Hebraic leader is one who understands history and people through the lens of Scripture. First and foremost people are created in the image of God, but also have been given the freedom to live their lives by a God who loves them. Therefore, the Hebraic leader is one who is familiar with human nature and the complicity of evil but also has the ability to engage in heroic acts. The highlight of the course for me was that Christianity is a religion in paradox the twoness of where we find ourselves. This aids any leader who can live and navigate decision-making in that influx of moving parts throughout time. Lastly, this course showed that the Hebraic leader is one who knows where they are going, and to whom they serve. To share in the promotion and promise of the Kingdom of God is the final destination.

      • #3087
        Medgine Present
        Participant

        Hi Emily! You made so many great points. I like where you said “ The Hebraic leader is one who understands history and people through the lens of Scripture.” Often, I hear atheists or agnostics critique the Old Testament because they do not understand its historical context. Most importantly, as you mentioned, they do not see the historical context through the lens of Scripture. Scripture serves to educate, instruct, correct, and convict us. Without it, we could never understand the sacred things.

      • #3250
        Angel Fierro
        Participant

        I like the way you pointed out something that should be often a reminder to christians, that not many understand the historical context of the bible. When you breakdown the bible and take time to study it, its often the goal for christians to break it down to then share with folks to help encourage them to read it. As leaders we have to share that knowledge and we can then see people later on if by their freedoms, fully experience the amazing gift of God.

        Thanks Emily!

        Angel

    • #2892
      Hannah Paul
      Participant

      Hebraic leadership is leading with a Kingdom mindset. Having that mindset keeps the world, our problems, and any hardships that come our way in the correct perspective. Thus, allowing us to make decisions with clarity and ultimately leading in a way that mimics how Jesus lived which is to serve those around us with both grace and truth. Hebraic leadership means taking the time to understand the history behind the ways in which the world is working. The historical understanding is able to guide our decisions, our conversations, and how we interact with those around us. With this historical knowledge, we can better know the root of Christianity and how we are to live while we are in the “in-between”. Being a Hebraic leader means knowing where you are going and taking responsibility for guiding those who join you along the journey to the Kingdom of God. Navigating this life is meant to be done with community and thus sharing about Jesus to the people you do life with right now is the best place to start.

      • #2896
        Devin Humphreys
        Participant

        Hannah, I appreciated three key things about your contribution here. First, the teleology of this response is on-point – the end is the Kingdom, but the means to understanding the in-between is historical knowledge. Second, I think your conflation of Hebraic leadership with living as Christ lived is a useful conflation to understanding what it is that a Hebraic leader is aspiring to as a model. Third and finally, I appreciated your supplemental contribution on how evangelization fits into the Hebraic worldview. Thank you for this contribution!

    • #2895
      Devin Humphreys
      Participant

      Before taking this course, I considered the Christian’s leadership role in the public sphere to be grounded mainly in the response Jesus gives to the Pharisees who ask whether they should be paying taxes to Rome: “Repay to Caesar what belongs to Caesar and to God what belongs to God” (Mk 12:17, NABRE). While this is certainly a true (if partial) reflection of the Christian’s role in the secular sphere, there are three things this Pathfinder course on Hebraic leadership has emphasized that I will take away from the course:

      1. Hebraic leadership remembers where we came from. While the Acts of the Apostles makes it clear that Jewish ceremony and Jewish law are no longer a mandatory part of the Christian religious tradition, we still need to center ourselves on at least the metaphorical Jerusalem to truly understand the roots of our Christian faith.

      2. Hebraic leadership does not fear using neutral tools for good ends. When Jesus says “my kingdom does not belong to this world”, it is less a rejection of worldly power than a recognition that His *absolute* power is heavenly in nature. We can use worldly power to achieve proximate goods while still keeping our eyes focused on that Kingdom which is to come.

      3. Our sphere of faith and political sphere, while they do not intersect, should (and perhaps even must) inform each other if we are to exemplify Hebraic leadership.

      With these three takeaways in mind, I look forward to continuing my wider involvement with the Pathfinder community!

    • #2905

      The Gospel of Jesus Christ recorded in the first four books of the NT portrayed Jesus as a servant leader, a good shepherd who cares for his sheep (his people), and one whose love led to the sacrificing of His own life for his creation; I believe that’s exactly who/what a Hebraic leadership implies.
      A lot of people have heard about God’s Kingdom that is to come, but they don’t understand how they can form part of this Kingdom. So through my participation in this Pathfinder course, it is now incumbent upon me to share my knowledge with “unbelievers” and those struggling in their faith to reveal God’s purpose concerning them.
      It means that I have a responsibility to share, lead and usher God’s sheep back to his shepherding. A United Methodist Hymnal song says, “A charge to keep I have, and a God to glorify,” that’s what it means to me.

    • #2925
      Nomsa C Mmakola
      Participant

      Hi Devin
      Thanks for pointing out those three things that Pathfinder course on Hebraic Leadership has emphasized.
      Where they came from, They do not fear using neutral tools for good ends, and their sphere of faith and political sphere.
      Hebraic Leadership is about serving others, it’s not about position, privilege, or power.
      Leader is a person of character and competence who influences a community of people to achieve a God honoring calling by means of the power of Christ.

    • #2927
      Oliver Cooper
      Participant

      Hebraic leadership involves leading in a Godly manner. It is guided by the words of God, as such Hebraic leaders tend to follow the examples of Biblical leaders, like Abraham, Moses, Elijah, David, etc.; inorder to lead successfully or achieve their earthly mission.

      Hebraic leaders tend to look into history to study the problems that some great Christian leaders faced and understand how those problems were resolved, so as to walk smoothly through their leadership journey. Hebraic Leadership also involves the acknowledgment and respect for diversity. Hebraic leaders are very much tolerant of others opinions, and cultural and religion beliefs.

      Hebraic leadership is recognizing your responsibility to both God and your neighbor; ensuring that you build and maintain a healthy relationship with God, and that you seek the welfare of your neighbor always.

      Hebraic leadership means embracing politics as a gift from God. A Hebraic leader is one who recognizes the significance of coercive power, especially when it aims at creating order, and enforcing morality.

      • #3021
        Benjamin Comire
        Participant

        Hey, Oliver, thank you for your response! We should truly be guided by our history and the Words of God. The more that I have journeyed on my walk in faith, the more that I see that we must be known by our love and respect for others, which will help us live well and stand out from others who do not do this. Hebraic leaders have unique priorities here on Earth as well look forward to the growth of God’s Kingdom.

    • #2939

      The definition of Hebraic leadership includes several elements that are important to Christians and to humanity in general. The concept changes radically when we understand that the Hebraic worldview not only includes Jewish elements but seeing the world as Jesus saw it. I would even say that thinking with a Hebraic worldview is thinking with the mind of Christ. Therefore, for me Hebraic Leadership means developing the character of a leader such as that of Jesus, having a clear path to follow with a clear vision and mission. Hebraic leadership also implies being brave enough to answer a call and being willing to leave everything to begin the journey that will lead the person to fulfill their objective, just as Christ did by leaving His throne and also as many of the prophets did, like Abraham. The Hebrew leadership must contribute to the establishment of the Kingdom of God and the fulfillment of his purposes.

    • #2999
      Deneisha Hollis
      Participant

      After receiving the in depth information about Hebraic leadership it allowed me to consider my own purpose as a leader and how it intersects with religion. I believe that in many cases Jewish people in Israel have been able to navigate this ideal in their own communities. It means that we should be able to apply our religious beliefs to our social, economical, political, and personal lives. It signifies that we should use our religious text to bring us closer to God and the envisioned kingdom that is planned for us. As a leader we should help guide others to a better understanding of scripture and how we should live our lives following closely to the commandments. As a believer it is my job to continue to use the words written thousands of years ago to help remain a faithful servant. Leadership ties into being a faithful servant of the Lord and I believe that is what Hebraic leadership enables many to do. I feel as if in America we should use these practices to bring people closer together and to not try to separate our leaders from their faith.

    • #3010
      Iliana Owen-Alcala
      Participant

      Hebraic leadership is a type of leadership guided by God, seeking God, and thirsting for God. One can see Hebraic leadership in saints such as Mother Teresa and St. Augustine. Like one of the lessons mentioned, power is only evil when used in an evil way but power yielded and guided by the Holy Spirit is inherently good. Hebraic leadership displays humility, strength, and a love for God. This can and should happen anywhere, from our homes to the federal government. Hebraic leadership has a place in all situations and that is where is belongs. In the work place and in the family, Hebraic leadership must take form for the flourishing of humanity. A mind and a heart for Jesus changes our entire outlook on life in an extraordinary way. Much like on of the lessons said, we should pray to see the world as He does. Striving for the Lord can bare nothing but good things, therefore, our minds should shift from seeking success to saying yes to the Lords call to follow Him and lead with the Kingdom of God in mind.

      • #3401
        Alyssa Zak
        Participant

        Iliana, I appreciated how you specifically drew out the virtues found in Hebraic leadership. I often view leadership as something to be avoided but to the extent that we are seeking after God, it can bring about goodness. Hebraic leadership can show people the love of God because of how sharpely it contrasts most human-centered displays of leadership. It is a good reminder how everything we do needs to be directed towards God rather than to our desires.

    • #3020
      Benjamin Comire
      Participant

      Hebraic leadership involves leading like Abraham and Christ. We are willing to leave our homes, travel far, and endure suffering and hardship like Abraham did so that he could see the promised land. We also are not concerned with power, maintaining power, or exerting control over others. In this way, we follow the example of Christ who is King but also came as a servant to man so that we could made free. If we are to embody the faith in our Lord Jesus and lead like Abraham, then we must be ready to face these unconventional aspects of leadership. Additionally, one thing in particular that is unique about Hebraic leadership is that the end goal is not success and happiness in this life, but in the life to come. We work not to reach Heaven, but to grow the Kingdom of God and grow its reach upon the Earth.

      • #3037
        Alan Ajit
        Participant

        Agreed, Benjamin!
        It is so incredible to learn that God-incarnate came down not be served but to serve others. You make a good point, as Christians we are to be humble and put others first. Only this way can we lead others to the Kingdom. Praise God!

      • #3040
        Isabella Carrazana
        Participant

        Great thoughts, Benjamin. I love how you started your post by referencing Abraham and Christ’s willingness to leave homes, travel far, and endure suffering. As Christians, we are similarly called to seek Christ’s kingdom above all else, and discomfort or even suffering is often part of that journey. I also love how you mention that our end destination is God’s Kingdom, not temporal goals like success and happiness in this life.

    • #3030
      Kara Brackney
      Participant

      Define Hebraic leadership in my own words and what it means to me.
      I can only define what this means to me by first stating that I have been drawn to this part of the world since I was young. Before I came to know Christ as my Savior, I was a practicing Buddist for a bunch of years and from that mindset and understanding I would have said “it must be a past life that I lived in the middle east to try to understand why I am drawn to this land and region”. However, I am not a Buddhist and do not subscribe to the concept of a past life (any longer). So, for me to define what being a Hebraic Leader means to me, I have to start here, in the middle east region (also called the Near East). 

      Geography and Human Geography are topics that are deeply interesting to me and that I spend a great deal of my free time on. I’m either traveling the globe (been to 33 countries and counting) or I am reading, watching, listening to, or talking with people about other parts of the world. I have an adventurous spirit, I’m biblically curious and I travel to places of the lesser known, intentionally. I’ve lived in Asia Minor modern-day Turkey, Jerusalem, Saudi Arabia, and Kuwait, and visited Dubai, Abu Dhabi, and Tbilisi in this region. For 7 years I have lived abroad and worked online. 

      Growing up in the US, I was exposed to the church’s “American style”. I didn’t like being forced to attend church, but that was my personal experience in my family. I know, my parents were doing the best they could to “raise their children in the church”. What I saw when I attended seemed shallow in nature. Much more about (what people were wearing at church/gossiping after church over coffee and cookies and which area people lived in). That was my whole take on church. I tuned it out as a kid and just sat in my seat on a pew and doodled on the donation envelopes. I did enjoy the singing, that part was nice. I also remember seeing a “New Testament” bible meaning it only had the NT but not the OT in it. Looking back now, I can’t even understand why a copy was printed. Why would someone intentionally split up the OT and the NT?

      That is where I am with the church in the US, it seems to be about (only the NT, big buildings or campuses, rock songs with Christian lyrics, skinny jeans, coffee in church, come as you are even if you’re wearing a T-shirt). I will admit, I’m torn between wanting to live in Jerusalem, covering my head with a scarf, wearing long modest dresses, observing Shabbat weekly with my husband, and inviting the neighbors over (Believers and non Believers). But, I also love to listen to and sing my Hillsong and Chris Tomlin worship music. Can I have both?
      That’s a rhetorical question. 

      As a person who loves to travel and has chosen to live in the middle east, I am also a Christian who wants to live in the same ancient lands where my Savior Yeshua lived. The more I study the OT and spend time here, the more I feel completion in my faith and understanding of the early Christians. The Way “Hodos” is how I “try” to live my life. I don’t watch TV, I stopped consuming anything from Hollywood more than 6 years ago. I am very mindful of what I “consume” of this world including friends (in real-life) and online, social media, YT, music, and all of pop culture. Because I was so consumed by all of that when I was younger and a non-believer, I am hyper-vigilant about my consumption.

      In conclusion, what it means to be a Hebraic Leader in our modern-tech world in 2022 is to quite literally walk the talk. Pray, fast, be humble, love my neighbor, forgive anyone who hurt me, give to the needy, and live each day as holy as I can. Know that I am a sinner and will fail but I will strive towards being holy and always, always keep my eyes on Jesus first. People ask me what drew my husband (who was born in Asia Minor) and me together and I say “it’s the way he loves Jesus first. His eyes are always on Jesus and I’ve never met a man who prays to God the way he does”. He is a sinner who was forgiven by grace and paid in full by Jesus’ blood. We are both living our days here on earth waiting to return to heaven- to enter the Kingdom. Our daily life is filled with prayer, our responsibilities, family, and friends. We wait patiently for the Lord to let us go home- to the Kingdom of God keeping our eyes on Jesus Christ Yeshua Hamasiach. 

      • #3036
        Alan Ajit
        Participant

        Kara,

        Thanks so much for sharing your testimony! I resonate with you especially as someone who grew up in a ethnic Orthodox church that holds so much tradition and beauty and draws me closer to the Near East culture. I am also pulled by some aspects of Western Christianity (I attended a Chris Tomlin and Hillsong concert few months back which was my first concert). I hope to one day visit the Holy Land which my Savior walked. Also, so happy to hear about you and your husband!

      • #3491
        Kari McDowell
        Participant

        Wow, Kara! The Lord has worked a wonderful transformation in your life and has blessed you with amazing opportunities, to live and travel in the Middle East. I think it is so cool how God gives us individual experiences, convictions, etc. to help us glorify Him in our own unique way.

        As to Hebraic leadership, I totally agree. The American Church has often lost our connection to the Old Testament and to Judaism, and thus has missed out on much of the inspiring examples and helpful concepts that can enrich our faith. So part of Hebraic leadership is leadership that responds to both the Old and New Testaments, seeing God’s glory in both and understanding the continuity and continuing narrative between the Testaments.

    • #3035
      Alan Ajit
      Participant

      Hebraic leadership dates back all the way to Abraham. Philos emphasizes leadership being geared toward crisis. An individual that “navigates” others who may be lost or in deep crisis is a good leader. Eventually, this individual leads his/her followers to “a destination not in space, but in time” through the use of a historic map utilized by a number of leaders the preceded them. For me, Hebraic leadership is further expanded by the Gospel message. We are called to be the light to others as well as the salt of the earth. Jesus tells us “You are the salt of the earth” (Matthew 5:13) and then follows this with “You are the light of the world. (Matthew 5:14). As Christians, we are described to be salt which is a highly valuable commodity that not only preserves food but adds flavor to it. Similarly, we are all highly valuable and capable of preserving God’s presence here on Earth and adding a little bit of flavor to the world. We are also called to be a shining light to others like Christ was and not hide in the darkness. We should allow the light to show our actions which glorify God.

      • #3039
        Isabella Carrazana
        Participant

        Hello Alan,
        Your response is very comprehensive and well-written. The historic map is certainly key to Hebraic leadership, especially leadership in crisis. I also love how you reference leadership to a destination, Christ’s kingdom. With a well-rounded, objective understanding of history, as well as with God’s clarity and wisdom, Hebraic leaders are well-equipped and much needed in today’s day and age. Ultimately, our aim is to glorify God, like the last sentence of your post mentions.

    • #3038
      Isabella Carrazana
      Participant

      Hebraic leadership is Christian leadership that understands the full history of the Bible (Old Testament to New Testament) and applies the historical understanding and Biblical principles to recent history and current events. God’s hand is prominent in our worldview, and the return of his kingdom is our final destination. Hebraic leadership isn’t Republican or Democrat, but kingdom-centered.

      Hebraic leadership means that I use the Bible and its context to inform my everyday life – even little things like reading the news, discussing current events with friends, etc. It also means that I seek God first and live for His Kingdom (on this earth and after Christ’s return). Personally, I am excited for the rest of the Pathfinder course because the Middle East is so crucial to global events, yet so misunderstood today. I am excited to learn more about what Hebraic leadership means and how a historical understanding can inform such leadership!

      • #3086
        Medgine Present
        Participant

        Hi Isabella! Thanks for sharing. I really like that you mentioned understanding the Old Testament and New Testament. I have met people that believe the Old Testament is no longer relevant or needs to be analyzed. When I was weaker in my faith, I stayed away from the Old Testament because I could not make sense of anything. I gave up on reading the Old Testament and decided to read from the New Testament. I started from the Gospel of John. After reading all the four gospels I understood many of the Old Testament passages for the first time. God truly opened my eyes. What I learned is that every book in the Bible is important to read and understand.

    • #3082
      Marieliana Cadet
      Participant

      Before diving into what Hebraic leadership means to me, the definition that stuck with me throughout this course in terms of the concept of leadership is that a leader, a good one is that of having others wanting to follow them, and that individual gets others where they need to go most importantly possessing the skill of being able to make good decisions at the forks of the road and it is applicable here to say that another term for leadership is navigation. Given the understanding of what is like to be a good leader and what it’s meant by the term leadership, Hebraic leadership is centered on one’s use of the map of cosmology to navigate this world and also the Hebraic map, being that one in which is based on the word of God to navigate this world. Furthermore, Hebraic leadership is more so on the application of the five pillars of the Hebraic tradition being that of deity, personality, history, plurality, and responsibility.
      Additionally, Hebraic leadership is about navigating the duality of history and himself before God’s eyes. Hebraic leader is deeply into the word of God, and they are not only students of the bible but also, a vehicle for spreading the Bible’s influence to the ends of the earth. Altogether, this can all sum up to say that Hebraic leadership is centered on seeking the Kingdom first, with God remaining at the center of that individual’s life.

    • #3085
      Medgine Present
      Participant

      Hebraic leadership means to lead people who are lost back to their Father. I think Jesus is very popular but not many people actually know him. I picture Hebraic leadership as someone who has oil for their lamp. They light up the lamp and walk through the dark world with clear vision than those without the lamp to guide their feet. Those who are in the dark, unable to get anywhere see this light and decide to follow. Jesus said of himself in John 8 verse 12, “I am the light of the world. Whoever follows me will never walk in darkness, but will have the light of life.” He also said, that we are the light of the world. So anyone who follows Jesus will have this light. It is our duty to bring others to the light so they can have their own light. That way the cycle continues.

    • #3169
      Emmanuel S. Wesley
      Participant

      In my own words or understanding, I believe that Hebraic Leadership is the foundation of Christianity. A Hebraic leader is a Christian who understands the Hebraic worldview through an idea/map called the Hebraic map. A Hebraic leader is also a Christian leader who knows where(Destination Jerusalem- Rev. 21:1-4)) he/she is going and how to take people/followers there.
      Hebraic leadership is a style of leadership that encourages other people to believe in and follow a cause or mission. Hebraic Leadership also consists of the ability of leaders to discern and make good decisions. A Hebraic leadership or Hebraic leader is someone who takes responsibility, stand up for what he/she believes, and makes critical decisions.
      Furthermore, being introduced to Hebraic leadership defines and widens my understanding of the whole idea of leadership. Hebraic leadership has changed the way I see the world and the way I have begun to practice leadership. I have learned that Hebraic leadership means that to be a good Hebraic leader, one must be a servant to his/her followers, a person who navigates or make ways, and someone who makes reasonable decisions by navigating through history.

      • #3291
        Grace Otto
        Participant

        Emmanuel, I loved your explanation and think that you hit on so many important foundational points of characteristics a Hebraic leader should have. When a leader shows confidence that they know where they are going, and how they are getting there, and is clearly 100% committed to what they are preaching, their followers should have no doubts or questions. This is how we as Christians follow Jesus, and he is our example! The ability to discern and make good decisions amidst crises and modern day issues can only be done successfully with the power of the Holy Spirit and by using our roots.

    • #3208
      Kelen Rojas
      Participant

      First of all, thank you for this first course that I just finished, a complete content, the Hebrew people have always been of importance in our foundation of faith, since everything starts from Abraham, and Galatians 3:7 says that those of us who are of faith, are sons of Abraham, and as blessed with him. So leadership is predominant

      The Hebrew leadership has been and will be influential, there is the main reason and it is the promise that God made to the Father of Faith, cataloged with this title, for obedience.

      Let us remember that the Hebrew people have an extreme relationship with God and follow his commandments, hence their leadership. They were the chosen people of God, and we must accept and recognize them.

      We can also say that his leadership is more biblical foundations that allow exalting and accentuating the scriptures.

    • #3211
      Stephanie Vega
      Participant

      Hi, Im Stephanie and I define Hebraic leadership as a way to see the organization and order of the Kingdom of God in earth. Is amazing how God choose people and he is constantly showing us the way and how is he.

      As a Christian leader I feel so grateful to hear and know more about the hebraic leadership and I think that everyone should take this courses. And when I say everyone I say literally everyone, pastor’s, leaders in Church and outside the Church, new believers etc…

      This is an amazing challenge for me to kepp learning. I really want to keep learning and applying the hebraic worldview in my life and in the places God allowed me to be. I also want to add that this is something that I have never hear in this way in the Church I grew up so I see that now I have the responsibility to share this information with others.

      • #3212
        Stephanie Vega
        Participant

        Hi Kelen!

        Wow, I agree with you! Hebraic leadership is influential. And I love the way you mentioned obedience. Our perfect example of Hebraic leadership is JESUS he is the perfect representation of the orden in the Kingdom of God in heaven. His love, compassion, respect and just everything that involve his leadership.

        As you say this type of leadership is more Biblical and we should give it more credit and learn more about it!

    • #3242
      Genesis Romero
      Participant

      After taking this course, Hebraic leadership can be defined as someone who sees the world how Jesus saw the world, through his lenses. The Hebraic tradition is not just someone who speaks Hebrew, or who has Jewish blood and embraces its roots. It is someone who can see the world through the Biblical eyes. It is leading the ones who are lost back to our Father. A Hebraic leader is also someone who knows where they are spiritually, and also knows where they are going. A hebraic leader can be defined as someone who acknowledges and knows that God’s character is what formed the Hebraic tradition. God is the primary being and we are the secondary character, made by Him and His image. A good leader also knows the past and history, not just the present. I believe all of this is very important, it changes our view on the world and makes it better. It also educates us and encourages us to get more involved in our history.

      • #3290
        Grace Otto
        Participant

        Genesis, I agree with how Hebraic leadership is all about perspective. I think that it is so important for us to take a step back and reflect upon how we are actually looking at the world around us and if we are seeing things through a worldly lens or Biblical/Hebraic lens. I also like how you included that God is the primary being and we are secondary. I think when in leadership positions sometimes it is easy to think that you are the primary one in charge because you are making all of the decisions, however those decisions should be guided by the Holy Spirit!

      • #3306
        Lillian Gillespie
        Participant

        Genesis, I really like how you interpret Hebraic leadership, especially with your opening definition of “someone who sees the world as Jesus saw the world.” That seems so simple, yet every day Christians fail to do so. That’s why the Bible also offers the “map” for how to live as a Hebraic leader, to live as Jesus, and then eventually through constant study, service, forgiveness, and prayer we are able to see and live in the world like him. It is sometimes hard for me to pick apart and see imprints of the Bible in modern life, but by refocusing on Jesus and his example it becomes easier (not to say there isn’t failure along the way).

      • #3440
        Josiah Geren
        Participant

        Genesis I agree that this leadership and Christian worldview encourages us to be more involved in our history. However; I would also point out that Hebraic leadership point to the future and that is the Kingdom of God. I really like how you added that “Hebraic leadership is someone who sees the world as Jesus saw the world.” I don’t think other Christians actually do see the world as Jesus sees it. With everything that is going on in our world it is important to remember how Jesus saw this world. With that said it is even more important to view our world and the people in it the way Jesus would see it and them.

    • #3244
      Santiago Baron
      Participant

      Hebraic leadership is based on following God, the Hebraic leadership revolves around the the idea of known that there is a path for our lives, in Hebraic leadership what matters is the trajectory not the destiny. We all know what the destination is but in hebraic leadership the person knows the final destination, so what matters to them is the path the trajectory. what we live to get to the final destination.

      hebraic leadership is about trusting the process and enjoying the trip. God know where we are going and all we need to focus on is the now, making sure we are doing what we are supposed to do in the moment and no so much about the future.

    • #3265
      Cade Coffee
      Participant

      Hebraic leadership, though a multi-faceted idea, is crucial for Christians living around the world to integrate into their daily lives in order for the teachings of Christianity to be implemented and represented the way that those who originally taught them had meant for them to be. Hebraic leadership begins with approaching scripture the way that the original authors intended for their original audiences to approach it. In order to do this we have to ask ourselves numerous questions, including but not limited to: What was the author’s intent? Why was the letter being written? What was the perspective of those receiving the letter/of those writing the letter? What cultural/historical/political norms were present during the time of the letter being written/received? In doing this, a Hebraic leader learns primarily from the scriptures how to lead well. Another important aspect of a Hebraic leader is the fact that the leader has others following him and as he leads, believing in an objective truth, he encourages people to pursue that truth on their own terms in a posture of respect and independent decisions, acknowledging the fact that not everyone around them is living or working from the same worldview. A final characteristic that I think is important for a Hebraic leader is that they are a life-long student. They never arrive at a point in which they believe themselves to be above learning or becoming a student themselves.

    • #3289
      Grace Otto
      Participant

      After taking this course, Hebraic leadership has a new and more important meaning to me. Hebraic leadership is the leadership style of a Christian who desires to step up to the plate and take initiative in living and leading following the Hebraic map that has been given to us in the Bible. It is someone that is willing to take risks while seeking wisdom from God and His word. Hebraic leadership means that you navigate through the trials we face with the goal of seeking the Kingdom in it, and using our history as a part of your guide. To me, this means that when I have the opportunity to fulfill a leadership role, I will be aware of the power that I hold, and the importance of using my influence to point people back to Christ. I will take responsibility for where I am and make submerging myself in the word of God a priority to ensure that I am leading how Christ would lead, and am guided by God alone.

      • #3400
        Alyssa Zak
        Participant

        Grace, I really like how you recongized the risks that come with leadership. You acknoledge that in this world there is a need to navigate many different trials and leadership, particularlly Hebraic leaderhsip, requires someone to step up and take responsibility. Rather than being dismayed by so many difficulties, you ended your post focusing on your willingness to take on some of that responibility which is, like you said, a mark of a Hebraic leader!

    • #3399
      Alyssa Zak
      Participant

      After completing the course, the two traits of Hebraic leadership that stuck out to me are wisdom and friendship.

      More specifically, wisdom in the leader’s knowledge of where they are going. In order to know where to lead others, you must first know where things began and what they are ultimately leading towards. Without those two things both parties are lost in a sense of meaninglessness. The Hebraic leader is rooted in the Hebraic tradition which provides the boundaries within which decisions can be made. Ultimately, continually growing in wisdom and knowledge of God is what cultivates this trait for the Hebraic leader.

      Second, a Hebraic leader must have deep love and friendship for others. This trait in particular stuck out to me because of how beuatifully it can be seen throughout Scipture. In many ways God’s people have demonstrated profound love for others even in times of great hardship. For example, the prophets continually preached repentance in the hopes their fellow Israelites would turn back to God.

    • #3439
      Josiah Geren
      Participant

      Hebraic Leadership is understanding where you are going and where you are from. It is understanding the history of conflict and engaging in positive interactions using the present and history as our guide. The Hebraic worldview is seeing the world the way Jesus saw it and taking responsibility for where you are and where we are going. It means to me that no matter where I am I must remember that I am leading people before me in every interaction, etc towards the Kingdom of God and that I make a impact. As a Hebraic leader I must follow my Christ to the best of my ability in a way that brings honor and glory to him. I am a vessel that God works through me to bring people to his kingdom. Hebraic leadership means to me that whatever power we have no matter how little or how large of power we have we have a responsibility to both God and man to use our power for the betterment of all.
      That is what Hebraic leadership means to me.

    • #3470

      For me Hebrew leadership is walking hopefully through reality. This means that we are aware of our potentials and our virtues in the same way that we are aware of our flaws and vices. This allows us to have a moderate and humble attitude. However, having the clarity that history is moving towards the final revelation of the Kingdom of God is the greatest hope we can have. This allows us to walk happily even in the midst of challenges.

    • #3471
      Krystal VanBennekom
      Participant

      Hebraic Leadership to me is understanding the scripture and life through the context is originated in. It’s coming to understand how we engage presently with a historic viewpoint. Hebraic leadership gives the leader the ability to see the world from a historic lens taking both words and actions at a fundamental action point and understanding that the way we take action from that point is vital in the outcome of the future of all we impact. Hebraic leadership is understanding that the impact you have has the ability to make vastly bigger impressions then you may be expecting to make. Hebraic leadership starts with our faith and the scriptures and pushes us to lead in the way the prophets and the Lord lead by example and relatability. Speaking and leading in a way that the people you are influencing can receive, understand and apply.

    • #3488
      Kari McDowell
      Participant

      To me, Hebraic leadership means leading in the light of the Hebraic worldview. In other words, taking the truths of the Bible seriously and taking them into account as we live in the world. To give just one example, one of the biggest things that God has been teaching me over the last few years is that I am a citizen of His kingdom, not a citizen of this earth, and I need to place my hope in Christ, not my country. I am a history professor, so I am blessed to have the opportunity to frequently reflect (and teach) on the rise and fall of nations and rulers. What I have realized is that the Lord’s Kingdom is the only one that endures and that I should not set my hope on any political leader, political party, or even nation. Growing up in the church, I frequently heard highly fearful and emotionally charged rhetoric (especially around election season) that our nation could avoid God’s judgment and be “saved” by one or another political leader. One particular political party was essentially seen as the “redeemer” of the American people. Gradually, the Lord has convicted me to think differently in this area, and the Basic Pathfinder course helped me continue to reflect on this. The Hebraic leader does not necessarily eschew politics, but he or she realizes that they are limited in their efficacy. He or she leads in love, not fear, and focuses on Jerusalem, not Washington, D.C. (or Wall Street or Hollywood, for that matter). He or she does not place their hope in any leader or party, knowing they are all fallible and impermanent; and his or her loyalty to the Lord trumps their loyalty to their country. Key verses for me in this regard are Phil. 3:20, Psalm 146:3-4, and Heb. 12:28-29. I am happy to share this perspective with my students, so that they can learn from some well-known (and lesser-known) Hebraic leaders in history.

    • #2606
      Chantel Barnard
      Participant

      Hi Courtney

      Truly appreciate your unique voice on defining Hebraic Leadership and what it means to you. I enjoyed your reflection on time, it focused on past and future, I am curious about the present. It is truly great how succinctly you put down what you learned and what Hebraic leadership means to you. Also very refreshing how you point out discipline of the Hebraic Leader.

    • #2653
      Nathan Alvarez
      Participant

      Hi Courtney,
      I really resonate with your emphasis on discipline as it relates to Hebraic leadership. I think we have a tendency to see leaders as self-serving in many ways, hence modern dissatisfaction with political figures. But you’re exactly correct that leaders are those that take on the burden of facilitating justice, emphasizing their role as a servant and not a tyrant.

    • #2607
      Chantel Barnard
      Participant

      Hi Ashley

      What really stood out for me in Your post, was the fact that you stated that Hebraic leaders remain mission-focused, I truly appreciate this reminder, it makes me remember John 15, how God asks us to remain in Him, knowing that we cannot bear fruit unless we abide in Him. So here I am convinced that remaining mission-focused will let each Hebraic Leader reach their destination, because without remaining in God it is impossible to do anything. The mission is walking the way, the way is Jesus, it is abiding in the path, that we become one with the Son and the Father, that we are able to do, that we are pruned and that we bear fruit. That we accomplish the mission and reach the destination.

    • #2784
      Audra Jones
      Participant

      Dear Mary,

      Thank you so much for your post; it accurately defines what Hebraic leadership is while showcasing your own perspective on Hebraic leadership. I enjoyed how you conveyed how the term implies that new is not always better and one of the best ways to be a leader is to learn from the past. Hebraic leadership seeks to not just learn from the past but to embrace history as a guide on how God has worked in the lives of leaders throughout time. It tries to comprehend the furthering of the Kingdom of God by casting one’s eyes on those who furthered the kingdom in their life times.

      Great job,
      Audra

    • #2785
      Audra Jones
      Participant

      Dear Katelyn,

      I truly appreciate your elucidation on the definition of Hebraic leadership. It is very true that Hebraic leadership pushes its leaders to act in the world to further the kingdom while simultaneously building the leader’s connection to God and the Abrahamic tradition of Christianity. Even though I think that Hebraic leaders are susceptible to some of the dangers of current politics due to their humanity, I agree with your presumption about these leaders’ acquisition of “situational awareness”. Hebraic leaders must know the history of Kingdom work or God’s work in the world through his disciples. In understanding that human nature tends to stay the same through the ages, Hebraic leaders should be more equipped to handle situations better than those who are not such leaders.

      Excellent work,

      Audra

    • #2791
      Arielle Del Turco
      Participant

      Harvest, you articulated this beautify. We are living in a wildly distracted world and it threatens at every turn to divide our attention and minimize the impact we are ultimately able to have. I appreciated how this course pointed out that Jesus viewed faith more as a path. Being on a pathway requires our attention so that we might consistently take steps forward and not stumble, focusing on God and His Kingdom.

    • #3001
      Deneisha Hollis
      Participant

      Hello Harvest,
      I think that you are so very correct we live in very troubled times but we must remain steadfast and vigilant! We can not waver from our beliefs and the promises of God. In a way we need to constantly reminded that our path should always have God in it. Many times people feel disconnected and it takes a sermon at church or synagogue to get us to be the leaders we all have the capacity to be. We all want to be in the land of milk and honey and that is why this work is so important for the Kingdom of God.

    • #2853
      Sarah Victor
      Participant

      Yes I agree! Starting where you are is often the hardest place to lead from. It takes a lot of humility to lead in the small spaces that no one really notices. But I have found that is where often I have grown the most. The small moments also give me an opportunity to learn by doing, and become more resilient in the face of criticism.

    • #2893
      Hannah Paul
      Participant

      Hi Nadia!

      Thank you for sharing your thoughts on this topic. I agree that our ultimate goal is what sets us apart. It is so important to be mindful of the Kingdom of God in our every day lives because, like you said, it distinguishes us between the world. If we lead and act the same way as the world does why would anyone want to hear what we have to say about Jesus? I really appreciated your takeaways. God bless!

    • #2894
      Hannah Paul
      Participant

      Hi Jaquan!

      I really enjoyed reading your thoughts on this topic. You brought up many good points. One thing I see a lot of today is incorrect teaching of scripture. Like you said, if we don’t have a Hebraic understanding when reading scripture, we can falsely interpret the words of God and cause misunderstanding. Humans misunderstanding of scripture has caused a lot of division within the church which is exactly the opposite of what God intended. While we won’t truly know everything, we need to be mindful to read scripture and interpret it the way God intended us to. God bless!

    • #2929
      Oliver Cooper
      Participant

      Hi Denise! Thanks for this mind blowing piece on Hebraic leadership. I think this could be further described as a True Servant Leadership. Like you said being a Hebraic leader is not about one personal benefits, but placing first the interest of ones followers above his/hers. Since Hebraic leaders are Godly leaders, they tend to lead from a biblical perspective. As such, they do those things that are morally right and just, and champion the cause of the expansion of God’s work here on earth.

      Cheers,
      Oliver

    • #3084
      Marieliana Cadet
      Participant

      Hi Denise,

      Thank you so much for this amazing piece of what Hebraic leadership is. I liked how you have compared and contrast the general way of viewing leadership and Hebraic leadership and also, how make note of the changes that separate Hebraic leadership from other leadership. Also, you mentioned that Hebraic leadership is about serving those around you, no matter their position, whether they are above, below, or alongside of you. This goes to show their humility and that they are open to serving whomever, no matter what.

      Thanks,

      Marieliana Cadet

    • #2940

      Connie, I agree on the importance of remembering contexts in terms of locations since this allows us to have a complete picture of historical events that have affected humanity. Regarding culture and influences, I consider it important to identify their origins, since many of them are based on roots that could be the origin of many current conflicts. Such is the case of the Arab-Israeli conflict, which originated in the time of Abraham due to the custom in which the wife could offer her servant to her husband to procreate. However, at that time maybe no one thought that many of Israel’s enemies would descend from Ishmael.

    • #2942

      Tom, I agree with you. I believe that the guidance of the Holy Spirit is essential when assuming Hebraic leadership. Without a doubt, it is important to understand the historical context of the events and see the world from a biblical worldview, but we cannot ignore the spiritual part. As it says in Ephesians 6:12, our struggle is not against flesh and blood, but against spiritual enemies. Therefore, having the guidance of the Holy Spirit is vital, since it is the one that guides us and gives us revelation.

    • #3000
      Deneisha Hollis
      Participant

      Hello Cristina,
      I loved that quote you chose and I believe that as leaders we do need to start looking into what we can do to serve locally. I think to do that we must always communicate with other servant-leaders. There are so many things that happen in our own neighborhoods but because we tend to prioritize work, family, and personal life we seem to miss the message of what God calls us to do. It should not take an advertisement on television or breaking news to get us to become the leaders we are meant to be.

    • #3009
      Iliana Owen-Alcala
      Participant

      Hi Cristina,
      I could not agree more! Being a missionary in our own neighborhoods is so important and desperately needed. Mother Teresa is a wonderful example of Hebraic leadership which one can see through she caring and humble heart. A heart for service goes so far and it is crucial in the world. It can be demonstrated in anywhere from our own homes to the rest of the world. You made a wonderful point and I really appreciate it.

    • #3008
      Iliana Owen-Alcala
      Participant

      Hi Michael,

      Thank you for your post. I found it to be very insightful and very true. Humility is crucial in leadership because without it, pride tends to take over. The course was very interesting and I think that you summarized the main idea very well. Seeking the Kingdom of God comes with humility which is why the Hebraic leader must abide by them so to not face corruption. Thank you for your interpretation on the subject.

    • #3083
      Marieliana Cadet
      Participant

      Hi William,

      Yes, I agree with your post. Especially when you pointed out that the Hebraic leader is humble and has a reverence for the role of God in our universe and daily lives. To a Hebraic leader, God remains the center of our lives and that’s part of seeking the Kingdom first. Also, I liked how you highlighted that a Hebraic leader is all about influencing those around us with the word of God not only are they students of the bible, they are influencers to the world with it.

      Thanks,

      Marieliana Cadet

    • #3245
      Santiago Baron
      Participant

      I really liked your answer. how you placed Biblical worldview into hebraic leadership. is really important to know that everything beings and ends with God. that lifts up the thought of were we go and what is our purpose in life. because know we know that our purpose is God and beings and ends with God. so now all we have to think about is in every step follow what God want for us in our lives every day.

    • #3249
      Angel Fierro
      Participant

      I really like the way you said it, simple and to the point. I think in this day and age we as christians often forget about our roots or our dual citizenship. I like to think about Tauren Wells’ song citizen of heaven when I studied the course. And in your words I could also see traces of the teaching found in the hebraic map in my life. Its realy important to step back and look at the teaching we have and apprieciate them. There is more too learn in the lessons we heard before.

      Thank you Michaela!

      Angel

    • #3268
      Cade Coffee
      Participant

      Jose, I appreciate your response to the question and agree that some of the core characteristics of Hebraic leadership is to take time to learn history, the Word, and with that knowledge make decisions. I think it’s crucial that as believers we make decisions having considered first what scripture teaches us. I also appreciate what you mentioned about loving your neighbor as yourself. I think this is crucial in our society where, as you said, grace and mercy are rarely the first response to someone opposing us or being opposed. I find it also very important that as we aspire to be Hebraic leaders we learn how to disagree well and express our differences, drawing clear lines in what we believe and not compromising who God has revealed himself to be in the disguise of being merciful and gracious. Really enjoyed your response!

    • #3296
      Katherine Lopez
      Participant

      Yes Jose, I agree I believe that leading with love is essential. It all comes down to love.all things will pass away and will be forgotten but the love of God and His word will remain, this is what will make an impact in this world. Is His love and kindness that would lead people into repentance. Beautifully said, great reminder. Thank you for sharing this with all of us. All that matters and will remain is love

    • #3297
      Katherine Lopez
      Participant

      I agree, we must stay vigilant int this world. Always keeping our eyes fixed on Jesus and remembering that is with and through His power, because of Him and the authority He has given us that we are able to do this things. Like Deneisha said we are all qualified and called to be leaders. It’s God’s wisdom, knowledge and revelation through us. We are all His vessels. We are all lamps shining bright for His Kingdom.

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