After taking this course, in your own words, please define Hebraic leadership and what it means to you. - Pathfinder

After taking this course, in your own words, please define Hebraic leadership and what it means to you.

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    • #1600
      pathfinderlms
      Keymaster

      After taking this course, in your own words, please define Hebraic leadership and what it means to you.

    • #1965
      Clay Shackelford
      Participant

      A Hebraic leader is someone who is a follower of Jesus first, and a leader of others second. As we talked about in the course, Jesus talked about his faith as a path, and early Christians called this path the Way. So, as a Hebraic leader, I must first realize that Jesus is going before me and walking beside me. Only when I’m in a relationship with Him am I able to lead others to follow this man.

      Once we realize who we are on this path with we must then realize where Jesus is going. Where is he trying to take us? What’s his destination (after his relationship with us)? His destination is His Kingdom. His Kingdom has already begun but it’s just getting started. When we are confident in who we are with and where He is taking us we can confidently invite others on this path (“the Way”) towards the Kingdom of Heaven.

      • #2270
        Harvest Prude
        Participant

        Hi Clay,

        I appreciated how you emphasized the importance of a personal relationship with Jesus in your response. Oftentimes the qualities of a good leader can be presented as a bunch of outward boxes to check, without first recognizing the internal work and character that first has to be present in order for the rest to be sustainable. It is only when we are first oriented internally towards Jesus and have our eyes on His leadership that we can then begin to lead others.

    • #1968
      Michael Caplan
      Participant

      A proper orientation toward where one is seeking to leading others to and a recognition that the telos being pursued remains the same as the words of Matthew 6:33 “Seek first the kingdom of God.” By definition a Hebraic leader is a guide to others but also respectful of the context in which he operates and desirous of the group’s common good, not primarily his own glorification. Hebraic leadership mandates a rootedness in historical & biblical knowledge and devotion to transcendent aims. Those transcendent aims entail building a relationship here on Earth with God and remaining a part of community even while distinguishing oneself from others through leadership roles taken. Hebraic leaders are not stilted or enslaved to convention, they operate dynamically. These leaders are bold in their zeal for their mission while also humble in how they view themselves in relation to others. A Hebraic leader does not lose sight of where they are going because they incarnationally live in community and worship God with the very same people who they seek to lead.

      • #2197
        John Ryan Rodriguez
        Participant

        Hey Michael,

        Thanks for sharing. I really enjoyed your perception of Hebraic leadership. As a leadership major in college, we learned that the destination/goal that leaders often reach is amplified through the means that often take to get there. As leaders with Judeo-Christian values, we are given the opportunity to share the values and teachings of our faiths while bringing others to our shared goals. There is no other opportunity to live a faith-based life than by putting ourselves out there with others. Thanks again for sharing.

      • #3008
        Iliana Owen-Alcala
        Participant

        Hi Michael,

        Thank you for your post. I found it to be very insightful and very true. Humility is crucial in leadership because without it, pride tends to take over. The course was very interesting and I think that you summarized the main idea very well. Seeking the Kingdom of God comes with humility which is why the Hebraic leader must abide by them so to not face corruption. Thank you for your interpretation on the subject.

    • #1971
      Jaquan Bryant
      Participant

      Hebraic leadership is a leadership that sees the world through the eyes of the Messiah that bridges the gap between those that are deemed Jews and Gentiles. The Hebraic leadership understands scriptures from a historical context deriving from the Abrahamic/Messianic covenant. The Hebrew words and language has various vibrant meanings when it comes to a Hebraic leader. When someone has a Hebraic understanding of the scripture it brings so much meaning and life to the scripture because you understand it from the Messiah’s perspective. Understanding history, brings meaningful revelation in the present and future context. Without a Hebraic understanding of scriptures then the meaning and translation will be lost and interpreted by one’s own will and intellect which gives rise to misunderstanding and erroneous teachings. The Hebraic leadership is there to help those who have no clue and to awaken those who have a clue that scriptures must be viewed and understood first from the Hebrew lens to understand the culture and customs of that time in order to approach what is considered the modern church and world of today.

      • #2894
        Hannah Paul
        Participant

        Hi Jaquan!

        I really enjoyed reading your thoughts on this topic. You brought up many good points. One thing I see a lot of today is incorrect teaching of scripture. Like you said, if we don’t have a Hebraic understanding when reading scripture, we can falsely interpret the words of God and cause misunderstanding. Humans misunderstanding of scripture has caused a lot of division within the church which is exactly the opposite of what God intended. While we won’t truly know everything, we need to be mindful to read scripture and interpret it the way God intended us to. God bless!

    • #1972
      Tom Woodward
      Participant

      Hebraic Leadership to me is a depth of conviction from the Holy Spirit that I am called to stand:
      1. For the downtrodden
      2. For the weak and heavy laden
      3. For those who without intervention will suffer lack

      In the same way that God leads me in paths of righteousness for His sake, I am called to lead my own family in a direction toward the Lord Jesus. My coworkers and employees are looking for a Hebraic inspired leader who will chart a course forward by example and not fiat; servant leadership that refuses no task as being beneath my rightful status.

      • #2942

        Tom, I agree with you. I believe that the guidance of the Holy Spirit is essential when assuming Hebraic leadership. Without a doubt, it is important to understand the historical context of the events and see the world from a biblical worldview, but we cannot ignore the spiritual part. As it says in Ephesians 6:12, our struggle is not against flesh and blood, but against spiritual enemies. Therefore, having the guidance of the Holy Spirit is vital, since it is the one that guides us and gives us revelation.

    • #2014
      Cristina Varela
      Participant

      The question posed brought my mind to a quote from Saint Teresa of Calcutta, “If you want to change the world, go home and love your family”.

      Far too often, I think we focus on what we could be doing a thousand miles away instead of what you can immediately be doing to serve the Kingdom in your own neighborhood.

      Like it or not, we are leading by example at all moments in our life. The “in-between period” is just as significant as the larger events in our lives as both provide opportunity to show others the face of Christ.

      God may not have called each and every one of us to a profession focused upon ministry, but regardless of vocation he has called us each and every one of us to serve our parishes, families, and communities on a daily basis.

      For this stage in my life, that is being a good daughter and sister to my family, and devoting as much time and treasure as I am able to my community.

      • #2026
        Mary Schulten
        Participant

        Hi Cristina, I love that you brought up Mother Teresa! I think that she was truly a Hebraic leader. A couple at my church actually spent many years serving alongside her, and I love hearing them tell stories of their time with her. One story came to mind. They were escorting Mother Teresa to a speaking engagement at a prestigious university, and Mother Teresa turned to the wife and said, “What do you think I should talk about today?” Of course, she was completely humbled and taken aback that Mother Teresa of all people would ask for her advice. So, she pointed her to the Gospel they had read that day and told her to speak about that. What amazing Hebraic leaders, both of them!

      • #2027
        Collin Bastian
        Participant

        Hi Cristina,

        I think this is a great point about Hebraic leadership – there are never just one or two people who can claim the title of leader in a society, as if we take the definition of being a leader as being a person who knows where they’re going and whom others follow, then it makes sense that we are all leaders at some point in our lives and in various contexts. If we are parents, then we will lead our children. If we are priests, then we will lead the laity in our parish. And the importance of deriving one’s strength from prayer and time spent with God, a critical piece of the Hebraic model for leadership, is important across all of these contexts.

      • #2035
        William Comer
        Participant

        Hi Cristina,

        Mother Teresa is a great example of a Hebraic leader! When I think of the impact Mother Teresa had during her lifetime it is clear she followed the path of a Hebraic Leader. Her humility characterized her entire career serving the poor in India and she maintained a clear focus on God above any Earthly title or position. Additionally, Mother Teresa possessed a deep love for others and used her leadership influence to inspire millions across the globe to care for the poor and downtrodden.

      • #2853
        Sarah Victor
        Participant

        Yes I agree! Starting where you are is often the hardest place to lead from. It takes a lot of humility to lead in the small spaces that no one really notices. But I have found that is where often I have grown the most. The small moments also give me an opportunity to learn by doing, and become more resilient in the face of criticism.

      • #3000
        Deneisha Hollis
        Participant

        Hello Cristina,
        I loved that quote you chose and I believe that as leaders we do need to start looking into what we can do to serve locally. I think to do that we must always communicate with other servant-leaders. There are so many things that happen in our own neighborhoods but because we tend to prioritize work, family, and personal life we seem to miss the message of what God calls us to do. It should not take an advertisement on television or breaking news to get us to become the leaders we are meant to be.

      • #3009
        Iliana Owen-Alcala
        Participant

        Hi Cristina,
        I could not agree more! Being a missionary in our own neighborhoods is so important and desperately needed. Mother Teresa is a wonderful example of Hebraic leadership which one can see through she caring and humble heart. A heart for service goes so far and it is crucial in the world. It can be demonstrated in anywhere from our own homes to the rest of the world. You made a wonderful point and I really appreciate it.

    • #2022
      Mary Schulten
      Participant

      Hebraic leadership is leadership that is centered upon the unchanging truth of God is, an acceptance of His ways, and taking action to live that out. A Hebraic leader doesn’t seek to reinvent the wheel, but instead looks to the scriptures for the timeless wisdom of the prophets and uses that as their guidance. A Hebraic leader seeks first the Kingdom of God. Hebraic leadership recognizes and uses the gifts of the whole person. He doesn’t ignore the problems and suffering of the world, but rather, he runs towards them armed with eternal wisdom. There is no conversion by force, for a true Hebraic leader knows that leading with humility and in service to others is the way to win hearts and minds. Hebraic leadership has the ability to speak to both those who know of the Kingdom and need to be ignited, and those who have never heard the good news.

      • #2784
        Audra Jones
        Participant

        Dear Mary,

        Thank you so much for your post; it accurately defines what Hebraic leadership is while showcasing your own perspective on Hebraic leadership. I enjoyed how you conveyed how the term implies that new is not always better and one of the best ways to be a leader is to learn from the past. Hebraic leadership seeks to not just learn from the past but to embrace history as a guide on how God has worked in the lives of leaders throughout time. It tries to comprehend the furthering of the Kingdom of God by casting one’s eyes on those who furthered the kingdom in their life times.

        Great job,
        Audra

    • #2033
      William Comer
      Participant

      The Hebraic leader is one defined by humility and a reverence for the role of God in our universe and daily lives. Leading from the Hebraic perspective places an emphasis on carrying out the desires of God here on Earth and influencing those around us to do the same. By placing God at the center of our lives and leadership philosophies the Hebraic leaders is aware of their own human limitations and ultimate dependence on God. The Hebraic leader reflects on the importance of Scripture and its rich history when making decisions and views history as linear with a clear end in sight. The Hebraic leader views their actions in the light of the God’s narrative and their place in the timeline of God’s Kingdom. Furthermore, Hebraic leaders remain focused on the ultimate goal of following God here on Earth and are careful to guard against the temptation for Earthly titles and positions to overshadow or overtake the greater goal.

    • #2156
      Kyle Hansen
      Participant

      I define Hebraic leadership as using a Hebraic worldview to see, plan, and lead people. As the Bible is Hebraic, written by Hebrews, unto Hebrews or to call people to follow the God of the Hebrews, a Hebraic viewpoint in many if not all ways, is a Biblical viewpoint. The worldview puts us in a universe whose beginning and end (telos), is unto God, values the special place that God put humans and humanity in the universe, orients oneself in relation to a meaningful history, sees the freedom of humanity and its complex diversity and plurality, and recognizes the Word that God has spoken to us and the world. To me the Hebraic worldview operates out of a deep respect for freedom (that God has given us valuable freedom, and that freedom is worth defending), truth (there is such as thing as truth, and God has a real will for our lives and says meaningful things about himself, us, and the world), and love (that the personal God has a desire of good will and to be one with us, and also desires us to love one another).

    • #2159
      Katelyn Hernandez
      Participant

      Hebraic leadership is based on God’s unchanging truth. It is clearly defined by humility and a strong reverence toward God’s teachings. Hebraic leaders will seek out the Kingdom of God by working to find closeness with Him. Not only do Hebraic leaders use the gifts that God endowed them with to navigate life, but they use them to address the issues they see around them in a suffering world. On the topic of conversion, they know and call upon moments in history to dissway forced conversion and show other God’s glory through humility, acts of service towards others, and observance. By doing this they can show others the truth without forcibly trying to shift another’s perception or outlook on life. Hebraic leaders do not allow their viewpoints to be clouded by the current politics around them. However, they don’t neglect to approach problems with profound situational awareness.

      • #2785
        Audra Jones
        Participant

        Dear Katelyn,

        I truly appreciate your elucidation on the definition of Hebraic leadership. It is very true that Hebraic leadership pushes its leaders to act in the world to further the kingdom while simultaneously building the leader’s connection to God and the Abrahamic tradition of Christianity. Even though I think that Hebraic leaders are susceptible to some of the dangers of current politics due to their humanity, I agree with your presumption about these leaders’ acquisition of “situational awareness”. Hebraic leaders must know the history of Kingdom work or God’s work in the world through his disciples. In understanding that human nature tends to stay the same through the ages, Hebraic leaders should be more equipped to handle situations better than those who are not such leaders.

        Excellent work,

        Audra

    • #2195
      John Ryan Rodriguez
      Participant

      Prior to taking this course, my understanding of Hebraic tradition and leadership was limited to the culture and language shared in Jewish communities in the Near East, and other parts of the world. In other words, it was topical and stopped at the root word – Hebrew. Now, my belief is that Hebraic leadership revolves around the values taught in Abrahamic faith communities; predominately, the Judeo-Christian groups. As a Catholic, I have always understood that the root of my faith is closely tied to that of my Jewish friends. That’s why I felt comfortable joining extracurricular leadership teams when I knew we were going to take it together. It was hard to describe why outside of knowing our friendship and opportunities just felt “right”. The content covered in this course gave light to what values we share and prioritize. Now, I can find other ways t build on my relationships with others that share common values with me.

    • #2253
      Olivia Layne
      Participant

      Before taking this course my understanding of Hebraic leadership was almost non-existent. I had been familiarized with Hebraic thought (regarding common fallacies made by Western interpretations of Scripture), but hadn’t been exposed to Hebraic leadership. The most impactful thing that I learned in this course is how Hebraic leaders wield power and Spirit in exile. Hebraic leadership is not frail or laid back, rather it is actionable and tangible. It celebrates personality and diversity while seeking to engage conflict with a nuanced perspective. Hebraic leadership promotes individual and collective engagement with difficult subjects, with the ultimate goal of seeking the Kingdom of God, which makes it unique from other forms of leadership. The Hebraic leader always has the Kingdom of God at the forefront of their minds, never as an afterthought. With the Kingdom of God in mind, the Hebraic leader remains humble and can take responsibility wherever it’s needed.

      • #2452
        Denise DeVatt
        Participant

        Olivia,
        I agree with what you said about taking responsibility whenever it’s needed. A lot of leaders, in my personal experience, like to blame others. I always had a bad feeling when people did things like that, and I have learned that even though I am not 100% of the time Kingdom first, I am working on that, and would like to inform others when they shirk responsibility as well, and to help them in any way possible! Thanks for your ideas!

    • #2264
      Jose Urquilla
      Participant

      Hebraic leadership is taking the time to learn history, the word, and with that knowledge make decisions. Like Abraham, words will be important when dealing with various stakeholders in our fallen world.

      Hebraic leadership means getting involved in a church and explore one’s gift for advancing the kingdom. To me, it all starts with the very basic: love your neighbor as yourself. This will result in positive engagement. If we see others, as creatures of God with dignity, relations will flourish. This will also mean staying humble. I live in Washington DC, where I see opposing views all the time. In many cases neither side shows mercy/love toward the other. I know that in my sphere of influence, this is the main concept that will help me bring about change.

      • #2294
        Patrick Bereit
        Participant

        Jose, I enjoy the importance you place on being involved in a church. This truly is essential in living out the ideals of Hebraic leadership and being encouraged by a like-minded community. Love really is what it all comes down to. I attend school at GMU, right outside of DC, so I definitely relate to the division and lack of mercy you describe. It can be despairing to see and it is all the more reason this concept of Hebraic leadership is so important and we must strive to live it out.

      • #2380
        Michaela Todd
        Participant

        Hi Jose, I agree with you that the state of our nation’s capitol – and our entire society – has become increasingly hard find people of different beliefs getting along. During the section of this course when Robert discussed the wielding of power, I liked how he broke down the history of power being abused not only by those who despise Christians, but Christians themselves. As the Church waited anxiously for Christ to come again after he ascended to heaven, people began to stray from God’s teachings, which led to the Roman church using coercive power to try and keep their communities on the path which God wants us to follow. It was convicting when the similarities drew to the state of America today. Our country was uniquely founded on Judeo-Christian beliefs, and when the majority of Americans lived lives walking with Christ, things ran for the most part smoothly. But when we see the majority straying away from the teachings of the bible, those who know that Jesus is the Way begin to panic and want to grab control wherever they can. But the Church cannot change the course of the world by implementing laws and forcing nonbelievers to stop living they way they do. Evangelism and changing people’s hearts and mind are the only way we can reunited our country as one nation, under God.

    • #2265
      Joseph Danaher
      Participant

      To me, Hebraic leadership means living the call found in oneself as Imago Dei in the way the Bible meant it to be lived, as opposed to the cultural notions we’re told to live by, be they utilitarian, Machiavellian, etc. Prof. Nicholson spoke of how core to this understanding is that the Hebraic leader leads in time rather than place. Having studied philosophy, I’ve always found time to be the most difficult question, profound but obscure. A philosophy of history in particular is even more enigmatic when good and diabolical nonsense when bad. To me, this helped reemphasize the need to “set [my] heart on things eternal.” It’s easy to get caught up in the everyday, but we need to be pulled out of it, but not for some sense of one’s personal legacy, but for the servant character of Christ, to be there for the Other to shine a light to them, to help each other toward the eternal kingdom. For me, this means being more cognizant of my roles in life, whether they be work or family or friendships or all other encounters, to walk alongside others not with a short fuse or even simply indifference, but to be always looking out for my neighbor the way the Good Samaritan did. I need to not let little things upset me or difficulties deter me but to seize the day, not in the Caesarian sense of making a name for myself, but in the Christian sense of the true end of all things, union with God. In a secular sense, being a little speck of dust in the vast expanse of time and space makes nihilism seem like a sensible perspective, but in the Christian sense, I can see that I am meant for this time, this place, this situation, that issue, that Other person. I think also of the perspective of time being more about the Event in non-Western cultures rather than some domination of nature for the legacy of one’s nation or self. This is key. This must guide me day by day.

      • #2269
        Harvest Prude
        Participant

        Hi Joseph, I appreciated how you contrasted the prevailing worldview—one that is often utilitarian, Machiavellian, and short-sighted— with living in light of eternity. But not only that, that you focused on how the ultimate goal of our lives is to orient ourselves and others towards God’s eternal Kingdom. It can be so easy and oftentimes natural to be focused on living a selfish life or even a decent life, and yet have that be divorced from a greater meaning or purpose. So I appreciate your very salient reminder.

    • #2268
      Harvest Prude
      Participant

      Hebraic leadership is not one simple, one-size-fits-all slogan or catchphrase. But if I had to sum up one of the core tenets of this style of leadership, I would say it is about being grounded and confident in the promises of God. Only without sure foundation can one then help guide others as well. The pathfinder course notes that the most important question for a Hebraic leader to ask and know the answer to is “where.” Where are you going? What is the ultimate destination? We must continually remind ourselves and others that the Kingdom of God is our ultimate destination. In our fast-paced modern society, there are so many siren songs calling to us, be that social media, a million different career paths, and the constant tug of obligation and responsibilities and temptations of self-indulgence. Any one of these things can end up distracting us or pulling us off of the path. The Hebraic leader must remain grounded and steadfast so that, though he or she navigates a world that preaches opposite messages, they can navigate this in-between time with grace and confidence.

      • #2293
        Patrick Bereit
        Participant

        Harvest, I agree it is difficult to simply define such a far-reaching concept, but I think you worded it very well. With an increase in digitalization, distraction and temptation is truly rampant in a way unlike ever before. I enjoy your emphasis on the importance for a Hebraic leader to be grounded. As the course taught, going into the dessert for periods of retreat, as well as the concept of a weekly shabbat, can assist in helping us be renewed in steadfastness and being grounded.

      • #2791
        Arielle Del Turco
        Participant

        Harvest, you articulated this beautify. We are living in a wildly distracted world and it threatens at every turn to divide our attention and minimize the impact we are ultimately able to have. I appreciated how this course pointed out that Jesus viewed faith more as a path. Being on a pathway requires our attention so that we might consistently take steps forward and not stumble, focusing on God and His Kingdom.

      • #3001
        Deneisha Hollis
        Participant

        Hello Harvest,
        I think that you are so very correct we live in very troubled times but we must remain steadfast and vigilant! We can not waver from our beliefs and the promises of God. In a way we need to constantly reminded that our path should always have God in it. Many times people feel disconnected and it takes a sermon at church or synagogue to get us to be the leaders we all have the capacity to be. We all want to be in the land of milk and honey and that is why this work is so important for the Kingdom of God.

    • #2292
      Patrick Bereit
      Participant

      Hebraic leadership is rooted in service, humility, and a firm foundation in the Truth of our Faith. My view has developed from this course, regarding how we ought to see the Kingdom of God not simply as a metaphor, but as something concrete, just as the early Christians did. Hebraic leadership can take various forms depending on a person’s vocation in life. For example, the way a stay-at-home mother exemplifies Hebraic leadership will have differences from that of a politician. Yet, they all are rooted in the Truth of the Gospel and an understanding of the five pillars of the Hebraic tradition. To me, this requires a greater sense of responsibility of how I lead through example and urgency in evangelization. As the course taught, Hebraic leadership must begin right where we are, in our homes and neighborhoods. To be a Hebraic leader is to be amidst the world, engaging with what physically surrounds us, with eyes set on the destination of the Kingdom of God.

    • #2379
      Michaela Todd
      Participant

      Hebraic leadership requires Christians to view the world the way Jesus does and challenges us to live a life based on how Jesus lived his life – which was rooted in preparing for the Kingdom of God and telling people about it. Discussing the fact that Jesus came to earth not to establish the new Kingdom of God, but to show the Way to enter it – which is only through Him – was a stark reminder. I think Christians today tend to only look at now and the future and forget the lessons of the past which Jesus himself drew his own teachings from. Breaking down the pillars of the Hebraic map (Deity, Personality, History, Responsibility) was both thought provoking yet familiar. I could see the traces of these in the Christian teachings I’ve received throughout my life, but I had never had it explained to me in this way. The session when Robert discussed how the physical coming of the Kingdom of God was also thought-provoking. I hadn’t thought about the idea of our dual citizenship as Christians, a physical one here on earth and a spiritual one in Heaven which is only received when one accepts Jesus as their Savior. In Hebraic leadership, we have a duty to serve the commandments of God and to follow the laws of the physical world on earth – but not at the expense of our covenant with God. Christians are called to be active in our communities and to lead the way Jesus did, and to do that we must fully understand the history which lead to Him being born and crucified for our sins so that we may enter the new Kingdom of God.

    • #2407
      Joseph Doherty
      Participant

      Leadership is the wielding of authority and power for the good, even if one’s own authority and power are only over oneself. Hebraic leadership is doing so in light of the knowledge of the Old and New Testament together. Some have desired to break the relationship between the Old and New Testaments. This is folly. Jesus and his apostles emerge from the Hebraic culture and constantly reference it. Jesus fulfills the promises and prophecies of the Old Testament. But do we understand the peoples, places, and tensions of the Old Testament? How do we apply the knowledge toward our own actions of leadership for ourselves and others? We must first study the historical realities explicit and circumstantial to scripture. With this depth of context and understanding we can then compare these to our current circumstances personally and in global relations. By asking the cultural questions, we gain insight into peoples, but also into Jesus’ teachings and how people respond to them. The application of this knowledge in prayer and humility is Hebraic Leadership.

    • #2450
      Denise DeVatt
      Participant

      Before this course I had very little understanding of Hebraic leadership but a very broad idea of what a leader should be, which as it turns out, is what Hebraic leadership is in my opinion. Leadership in general can often have a very negative connotation but I think Hebraic leadership changes that quite a bit. Hebraic leadership doesn’t focus specifically on “leading” or being the first one with the ideas or the person that everybody is required to respond to. A person who is a Hebraic leader will be one that listens to the others around them and takes their ideas and thoughts into consideration, sometimes without stating their own opinions. In my opinion, Hebraic leadership is not about amassing power or using that power over others or but instead, is about serving those that you work above, below, and alongside. It’s not about your position or title, but instead what you do with those things that you have earned.

      • #2929
        Oliver Cooper
        Participant

        Hi Denise! Thanks for this mind blowing piece on Hebraic leadership. I think this could be further described as a True Servant Leadership. Like you said being a Hebraic leader is not about one personal benefits, but placing first the interest of ones followers above his/hers. Since Hebraic leaders are Godly leaders, they tend to lead from a biblical perspective. As such, they do those things that are morally right and just, and champion the cause of the expansion of God’s work here on earth.

        Cheers,
        Oliver

    • #2576
      Christina Sturgeon
      Participant

      A Hebraic leader goes on a journey of faith—of becoming—in response to the call of God. The act of doing so/navigating terrain while clinging to the Word of God as others follow your direction showcases the notion of Hebraic leadership.
      I’ve always been intrigued with the notion of duality. In a very obvious way, as a “theater kid,” I inhabited two worlds at the same time: one where I’m Christina and another where I’m a character. But obviously, both worlds take place in the same time and space. When I think about my Christian walk, I’m sensitive to the spiritual realm while also being aware of a worldview that does not acknowledge that reality. Even an individual Christian experiences a duality—being torn between his/her flesh and spirit.
      For me personally, I’m drawn to how Hebraic leadership can be manifested in statesmanship. Specifically, with my law background, I would be honored to serve in a diplomatic role in the future. A Hebraic leader thinks historically and can hold the tensions of a dynamic world, yet pursues existential hopes with an appreciation of proximate fulfillments until His coming again.

    • #2585
      BANZA MUKALAY
      Participant

      Hebraic leadership is to lead people behind you in midst of wilderness but knowing where you come from and where you going, understand the difference between Christianity and church helping the church to know what is missed today, the kingdom of God is the main gospel that church should be aware of and that is Jerusalem the kingdom on earth this is the Hebraic leader must know and preach. The church should know and understand the destiny is not the heaven but the kingdom of God that why Jesus said seek first the kingdom of God and his righteousness.. Hebraic Leader is some on who knows how to use his or her word in midsts of conflict and never give up no matter situation, Daniel and Esther where in exile but they new where they where and where they came from. Hebraic leadership wake me up now I understand that even your are a leader you have to be humble and to take responsibility to teach people to know they destination which means we are taking people from point A to point B I really understand the near east is so important in my belief. The last thing is that Hebraic leader walk by faith but not by sight.

      • #2729
        Shawrath Anthony
        Participant

        Hey Banza,
        I really appreciate how you covered so much ground in your post, briefly highlighting on many aspects that make a Hebraic leader. I like how you stressed the need to be humble and remember where you come from because humility is a key component of a hebraic leader. Lastly I really appreciate how you also stressed the need for being a person that walks by faith and not by sight.
        thank you for your post

      • #2882
        Austin Pellizzer
        Participant

        Hello Banza,
        I like your comment on the idea of leading amid wilderness and knowing where you come from and where you are going. I think this is such an essential aspect of today’s world. Many of today’s leaders intentionally or unintentionally leave behind their roots of where they came from to fulfill the position’s duty, in many cases losing touch with their upbringing and, as a result, their values. However, a true Christian leader can uphold the responsibilities of said leadership position while simultaneously practising and keeping in mind the fundamental values they hold near and dear to them, which made them the person they are today.

    • #2605
      Chantel Barnard
      Participant

      The Hebraic leadership is a blueprint map of cosmology:teaching and training humble Semitic Christian leaders- world navigation in exiled deployment.

      Hebraic Leadership is centered on seeking first the Kingdom of God (righteousness, peace, and joy in the Holy Spirit) and His righteousness. Seeking the tangible place- New Jerusalem, God’s will be done and His kingdom come on earth as it is in heaven. As a friend of God and a friend of man: It is to leave native country, to embark on a journey of faith,responding to the call of God (forsaking all). To journey the Way to the Kingdom and undergo the process of becoming.

      A time-based leadership: understanding the origin, destination and fellow comrades oriented towards Jerusalem with biblical sight; honing the skill of clarity and wisdom founded on the fear of God, YHWH,and His Word. Deployment is crisis focused to confront chaos,leading people through it; beginning in one’s own community into the Near East. To go ahead, braving danger and confusion; guided by encouragement in God’s Word through conflict.

      It is to be a student of the Near East and beyond the Near East to discern: one’s individual path (faith journey) in this world and encounter faith for everyone in revelation of God in a shared mission- historically, culturally and spiritually. Relating in a mutually dynamic heart with the Near East: to help and be helped.

      Hebraic Leadership is the application of the five pillars of the Hebraic tradition:
      1. Deity,
      2. Personality,
      3. History,
      4. Plurality, and
      5. Responsibility
      To navigate duality in history and in oneself before God’s eyes. Hebraic Leadership is tangible, the leader is: someone others want to follow, who gets others where they need to go, who makes good (godly) decisions,who receives timely direction, a unique responder, a conductor of self and others in God’s presence and power. To be a disciple: A student and vehicle of influence of God’s Word.

      Leadership prioritizing one’s personal relationship with God. Practicing the sabbath, praying and fasting to seek the baseline to see the world truly and to return to service. Ministry (to change hearts and minds), promoting Redemption and embracing politics as a gift from God using tools appropriately. To trust and take heart in God who holds the future and His sovereignty over it all, whilst affirming one’s own responsibility.

      • #2654
        Nathan Alvarez
        Participant

        Hi Chantel,
        I really appreciate your emphasis on the Kingdom of God–how Hebraic leadership focuses itself on the kingdom that is not yet here, in a sense. For if leadership is that–leading oneself and others to a destination–what can be better than leading to the Kingdom of God, a kingdom marked by peace, order, and true justice? In this sense you are exactly correct that a true leader–a Hebraic leader–identifies those virtues that have not yet been attained but unremittingly commits themselves to their end.

      • #2728
        Shawrath Anthony
        Participant

        Hi Chantel,
        I really love the connection you drew between seeking the Kingdom of God and stepping out in faith and thereby becoming who God has Called us to be, which you phrased as “the journey of becoming”
        I think it’s so important in our christian walks to understand that while God is calling us to do great things, it also requires obedience and faith to step out and do the things he is asking is us to do.
        Your post spoke to me

      • #2762
        Samuel Vandeputte
        Participant

        Hi Chantal,

        Thank you for your robust overview. I like your structured response and in particular that you started with the overarching vision that drives a Hebraic leader, after which you explained what this means in practice.

        I would be curious to hear more about how you experience this journey as a Hebraic leader yourself. How do you find the combination of leading others whilst following God? How do you link your vocational mission to the Near East?

        Cheers,
        Samuel

      • #2945

        Hi Chantel,

        Great recap! I liked this line, “Practicing the sabbath, praying and fasting to seek the baseline to see the world truly and to return to service.” One of my favorite books is The Sabbath by Abraham Joshua Heschel. As I see it, the Sabbath is where Deity, Personality, History, Plurality, and Responsibility all come together. I wonder what your thoughts are on the Sabbath from a Christian point of view? Do we treat it as we should?

        Thanks!

        JCK

    • #2652
      Nathan Alvarez
      Participant

      Hebraic leadership is the process by which we, as Christians, as a Church, as a people of common ancestry, and as a global community, achieve true justice through a common orientation toward God and His Kingdom. The achievement of Hebraic leadership has both individual and macro-level goals; by emphasizing the duality of man as living within one world but for another, Hebraic leadership has a uniquely spiritual gaze that emphasizes man’s true nature. Hebraic leadership is also, in many ways, a partnership–one that seeks communion with our fellow man for both our benefits. In this way, Hebraic leadership takes on a dimension of humility, for if a true leader seeks communion with another, they must first acknowledge where they themselves can grow and recognize where true authority resides–in God Himself.

      • #2928
        Oliver Cooper
        Participant

        Hi Nathan, thanks for this insightful write-up of what a Hebraic Leadership entails. I really like how you mentioned the significance of Hebraic Leadership to oneself (individual), and our global environment (macro-level). Looking at the concept of Hebraic Leadership, I think the world would be quite a better place if all Christians adhere to these leadership principles. Furthermore, this will enhance the Great Commission of our Lord, ie. the spread of the Gospel, and the expansion of God’s work on earth.

    • #2655

      To me, there is one key defining element that sets a Hebraic leader apart from a regular leader – their compass. A Hebraic leader looks to God for guidance at all times and every decision they make is influenced by their faith. A Hebraic leader looks to the character of God as an example to follow. God’s compassion, His selflessness, His love, His mercy and His faithfulness are all virtues that a Hebraic leader seeks to embody. Moreover, a Hebraic leader understands that God gave us free will and as they seek to emulate His leadership, a Hebraic leader believes in providing their followers with choices. A Hebraic leader will clearly articulate to their followers what is right and wrong, but they will never force any of them to make the right decision as this impedes on their free will. In order to provide guidance to their followers, a Hebraic leader needs to have an in-depth understanding of their own history, which is laid out in God’s word. They also need to know how to hear God’s voice as ultimately, they will need to seek His guidance as they navigate the chaos of this world and make tough decisions.

      • #2763
        Samuel Vandeputte
        Participant

        Dear Renita,

        Thank you for this thoughtful reflection. Your emphasis on free will is interesting, embedded in a moral framework that steers those under your leadership.

        Another interesting point -which you mention sets the Hebraic leader apart- is the compass that drives the Hebraic leader. I agree with you that we should look to God’s exemplary character. I do wonder, however, how you do that? How do you translate God’s virtues into leadership in concrete and tangible ways?

        Cheers,
        Samuel

      • #2792
        Arielle Del Turco
        Participant

        Hi Renita,

        I love the point you made! A clear vision is important for any leader. How else can he or she guide others? The Hebraic leader focuses on God and looks to scripture for guidance and wisdom. It is only when we are filled with God’s Word that we will have the confidence to make hard decisions and lead others as we navigate the confusion of this world.

      • #2837
        Jamila White
        Participant

        Renita,

        I love that you pointed out that a Hebraic leader looks to the character of God. This is certainly true. We cannot base our morality on anyone else other than the One who is just, good, and true. The world is in need of Hebraic leaders who are willing and desiring to exhibit the character of God. This alone will go a long way in influencing others. I greatly appreciate you pointing out the importance of a Hebraic leader understanding their own history. Awareness of past times and awareness of one’s identity is crucial. How can we lead if we are ignorant of the basics? Great post!

        Jamila

    • #2671
      Evan Crain
      Participant

      The chapters of metanarrative of the Bible, as commonly described, are Creation, Fall, Redemption, Restoration. Hebraic leadership is a “four chapter” framework for those endowed by God the gift and purpose of leadership. Western missiology and many Christian organizations often fall into a “two chapter” trap: they emphasize sin and salvation, particularly personal, but neglect our collective origin and destination. Hebraic leadership, as stated in the course, emphasizes a historical foundation for Christian leaders beginning with remembering the past events shaping today, our roles in the continuation of a linear path, and the path’s ultimate fulfillment in a literal Kingdom.

      After stumbling upon the Philos Project through a friend, I’m amazed to find the Pathfinder course expresses my deepest motivations and intentions. I raised myself on hero literature from a Hebraic leader worldview, reading historical fiction of young men who were forced from home by an evil, encountered hardship and yet rose in administrative power in exile, similarly as Joseph and Daniel, returning home eventually to right the original injustice (Byzantium by Lawhead a prime example). Personally, I couldn’t finish college fast enough, getting my piece of paper at 20 so as to get out into the world and learn to lead. 9 years later with a career around the world designed intentionally as a “statesman in training,” I’m shocked to find the Pathfinder course so uniquely expressing, expanding, and progressing a deep felt calling that began in childhood – even encouraging some to pursue statesmanship! I have often felt alone or an oddity because of my intentionality and I am encouraged to find a community of leaders who feel the same calling for their lives, grounded with the support of education and mentors to mature that intentionality.

    • #2727
      Shawrath Anthony
      Participant

      After taking this course, I’ve come to understand Hebraic leadership as servant leadership whose model is the same as the model of Jesus leadership. It is a leadership style that is both humble and confident, meek and just but most importantly is a leadership model that is lead by the spirit of God.

      A Hebraic leader seeks to influence his environment with his gifts and talents to advance the kingdom of God (the church). This is always the Hebraic leaders end goal.

      A Hebraic leader promotes redemption and the message of Jesus because he understands that this is a fallen world and needs God; in the the pursuit of bringing God to his area of influence, he also seeks for the betterment of the lives of people and engages in rebuilding societies and cultures, hopes and dreams. A Hebraic leader is one that is driven by a God given vision and is fervent in seeing that come to pass.

      • #2779
        Ariel Fierro
        Participant

        I admire the comparison of Hebraic leadership teaching to Jesus’ teaching – humble and confident to be led by the spirit. The main priority of Hebraic leadership is to stand firm in God’s word but not lose sight of gaining people to join in the first place. The use of talents and gifts to advance the kingdom of God can be used to guide new souls to the Lord and create another step for them to gain Hebraic leadership.

    • #2761
      Samuel Vandeputte
      Participant

      Hebraic leadership starts with the eschatological positioning of ourselves in the “here but not yet”. We are in a reality where the Kingdom is present, but not fulfilled. We are, however, not supposed to passively await the coming of Christ. Instead, we should seek the welfare of the city, in whatever area we are called towards. If you are prone to being able to deal with power, for example, your calling is probably in the area of politics. A Hebraic leader never loses track of the bigger picture. His loyalties primarily lie with the Kingdom, which is both physical and spiritual. His focus is on Jerusalem. To me, Hebraic leadership an important lens to look at reality through. It positions us within the grand scheme of things, giving meaning, and translates the truth of the gospel into concrete, everyday action. The Hebraic worldview thus offers the orthodox paradigm for those belonging to the body of Christ.

      • #2778
        Ariel Fierro
        Participant

        I like how you automatically stated the start of Hebraic leadership, “here but not yet.” In addition to the reality of not passively awaiting the coming of Christ. I agree with the stance of Hebraic leaders’ call to action to gain souls as they are attentively seeking the word of God to stay within their image and not be tempted of the world’s ways. The focuses are very simple but can be taken off course and that is where knowing the position we are in will be essential.

      • #2794
        Dominique Hoffman
        Participant

        Hi Samuel! I really like how you address how the Hebraic leaders is operating in the present yet awaiting God and making decisions that constantly point towards the new Jerusalem. Our role as Hebraic leaders is to actively participate in the events that point to the Second Coming. All of history is moving towards that moment and the Hebraic leader operates in that authority, perspective, and worldview which informs all aspects of leadership. As you mentioned, the Hebraic leader never loses track of the bigger picture.

    • #2777
      Ariel Fierro
      Participant

      Hebraic leadership thinks historically and views the world through a biblical lens, but keeping in mind to have the perspective of Jesus Christ.

      Hebraic leadership means to me that one is not trying to be solely the image of God but to see through Jesus’ eyes. How to navigate through two realms – the earth and the spiritual. Additionally, continue on the path of Hebraic tradition. Growing up, we are taught that natural-born leaders have confidence, have the “right walk,” and so forth. However, Hebraic leaders have those traits and understand the history of something half hidden and half revealed. Within this, they must account for being responsible for their surroundings and affirming God’s sovereignty over it all. Hebraic leaders must dive into understanding and walk in the word of God to teach those around them. This creates an image of what we, as Christians, must entail. If we are to be called Christians but not know the roots of where the belief originated from and not create a faithful path for others to follow, how are we Christians and even so Hebraic Leaders?

    • #2783
      Audra Jones
      Participant

      Upon finishing this course, I found that Hebraic leadership is not simply defined. It is multi-faceted and revolves around recognizing the sovereignty of God. Hebraic leadership centers on knowing the will of God and how to honor Him, while in leadership or trying to be a leader. It requires a Christian leader to pivot his or her viewpoint to the origin of Christianity, Jerusalem because a leader is a follower of the living Christ for the Kingdom of God. Christ walked among the people and humbled Himself as the savior of mankind. A leader in the Hebraic form is someone who exhibits that same type of humility as he or she becomes a part of the community that he or she is trying to lead. This type of leader understands and lives amongst the people and tries to be like Christ in leadership through Jesus’s eyes. This is not only what I believe the definition of what Hebraic leadership is but also what it means to me. It means that a leader is a servant like Christ to the people and to foremostly to God.

      • #2897
        Devin Humphreys
        Participant

        Audra, I found it insightful that you’ve begun this response by grounding Hebraic leadership in first principles, and more specifically in the sovereignty of God. More generally, I also agree with you that servant leadership is an important aspect of the Hebraic worldview. However, I would also encourage you to more fully consider the idea that there are a multitude of paths to Hebraic leadership. It seems almost counterintuitive to assert that a leadership model grounded in our Christian identity would not always point back precisely to Christ, but I think one of the strengths of the model of Hebraic leadership is how it is able to adapt our Christian worldview to the circumstances in which we find ourselves (certainly different from the circumstances at the time of Jesus’s being on earth!).

    • #2786
      Audra Jones
      Participant

      Upon finishing this course, I found that Hebraic leadership is not simply defined. It is multi-faceted and revolves around recognizing the sovereignty of God. Hebraic leadership centers on knowing the will of God and how to honor Him, while in leadership or trying to be a leader. It requires a Christian leader to pivot his or her viewpoint to the origin of Christianity, Jerusalem because a leader is a follower of the living Christ for the Kingdom of God. Christ walked among the people and humbled Himself as the savior of mankind. A leader in the Hebraic form is someone who exhibits that same type of humility as he or she becomes a part of the community that he or she is trying to lead. This type of leader understands and lives amongst the people and tries to be like Christ in leadership through Jesus’s eyes. This is not only what I believe the definition of what Hebraic leadership is but also what it means to me. It means that a leader is a servant like Christ to the people and to foremostly to God.

      • #3022
        Benjamin Comire
        Participant

        Thank you for sharing, Audra! I wholeheartedly agree that Hebraic leadership involves serving in humility amidst the people as Christ did. Too often, we get lost in our lives and wonder what the most important priorities of faith are when they sometimes stare us in the face with Christ’s example in the Gospels. We have to reorient ourselves to Jerusalem and the Near East, and in doing so we will come home to the place where we belong in God’s Kingdom.

    • #2790
      Arielle Del Turco
      Participant

      After taking this course, I understand Hebraic leadership to describe leaders who follow God, focusing on His Kingdom, and lead others with wisdom, hope, and a servant’s heart. Adopting the characteristics of a Hebraic leader will set us up to embrace the Christian faith as a path that we walk, much like the way Jesus viewed it. A Hebraic leader is anchored in the Word of God and makes difficult decisions with humility. Hebraic leadership does not shy away from complexities and paradoxes. Humanity at large—and the nuanced issues at play in the Near East that interest many of us taking this course—is too complicated to boil down to a simplistic narrative. Hebraic leaders can be comfortable with plurality and make room for a wide variety of beliefs and opinions even as we hold to a transcendent truth, rooted in the Bible. This perspective makes it easier to understand and respect those from different faiths and backgrounds and constructively engage with the Near East.

      • #2795
        Dominique Hoffman
        Participant

        Hi Arielle,
        I really like how you observed that the way of the Hebraic leader and how the worldview sets Christian leaders apart from other non-Christian leaders. Humility is a hallmark characteristic of the Hebraic leaders, a virtue Jesus exhibited on during his time on earth and in His own ministry. I like how you noted a Hebraic leader, in the preset of upholding righteousness, does not shy away from complexities or paradoxes. This leads to the ability to operate in the physical realm here on earth, pursuing plurality and peace even with leaders and people from other cultures and beliefs.

    • #2793
      Dominique Hoffman
      Participant

      Perhaps one of the biggest takeaways from this course for me was the conviction of taking the hope I currently place in Washington D.C. and placing it on Jerusalem and the day of the New Jerusalem. Working in politics I often find it hard to not assemble into worldly ideological factions or place my hope in the policies around me. As we await the kingdom to come the Lord also calls us to roles of leadership, and for those of us who feel called to manage power to achieve proximate justice our roles in politics should be governed by an eternal and historic mindset discerning the Spirit in an attempt to manage and achieve peace in crisis. Working in government is essentially the job of managing crises with the objective of averting conflict if not to achieve peace. Understanding the bodily and spiritual factors involved in conflict domestically or internationally requires the Hebraic leader to understand that the decisions they make operate along a much longer history and time, rather than current space. The Hebraic map emphasizes history, viewing the world as a state of becoming and always moving forward. Politics is really all events moving towards the New Jerusalem. As a Christian leader it is my job to make decisions at forks in the road that discern history and the Word rather than relying on my own knowledge or intuition. I am drawn to this course because of the emphasis of hebric leadership in crisis. As a leader, I want to understand the two worlds I walk in and how this duality should inform my decision in political life. This question is a little tricky for me, working in international policy research, my neighborhood is international and vast. The work I am involved with is directly related to conflict and like Abrbaham I want to seek when to advise words and power. I believe the best way to be a Hebraic leader is to follow the five pillars outlined in this course, specifically the one tangible way I want to challenge myself to understand responsibility and be the living link between heaven and earth. In my line of work, I encounter people who do not love the Lord or view history in the same way I do. I want to see this as an opportunity and to fill in the gaps of where Hebreaic leadership is absent. It is my responsibility and understanding responsibility as I research and advise large cooperation and sovereign nations is one way I can exhibit Hebraic leadership.

      • #2836
        Jamila White
        Participant

        Dominique,

        I appreciate that you brought out that your decisions should be based on the word of God rather than human knowledge. Our knowledge is finite (cf. Ps. 147:5). I appreciate your heart for desiring to lead people morally and with great respect to the responsibility this position calls for. I also made note you mentioned the eternal and historic mindset that should always be before a Hebraic leader. I agree completely. Although we are in the present, we are to be mindful of both past times and the eternity that awaits us. Only God can help us operate in such a manner for He himself is eternal and is timeless. I understand this question may be a struggle to answer, however, I believe that God is the one who can help us wisely navigate these issues for His plan has been established since the foundations of the world.

        Jamila

    • #2834
      Jamila White
      Participant

      In order to understand Hebraic leadership, one must first understand leadership. I would define leadership as someone that helps navigate others to the final destination, ensuring that maturity and wisdom is executed in the midst of life’s twists and turns. I liken the definition of leadership to what a GPS does for us today. When we use a GPS, we are relying on that system to help get us to the destination. This course pointed out that perhaps the most essential for a leader, particularly a Hebraic leader, is “Where am I going?” An Hebraic leader has a biblical worldview and humbly submits to God as a vessel to be used. Hebraic leadership entails clarity of the vision and purpose of their journey as well as applying wisdom to ensure biblical informed decisions are made. Hebraic leadership involves one having a listening ear to the instructions of God. In order to have a listening and willing ear, the Hebraic leader must have humility. This is how I would define Hebraic leadership and what this form of leadership means to me personally.

    • #2852
      Sarah Victor
      Participant

      I think it means that you keep moving forward, courageously having a hope and vision for the future despite the tragedies and chaos around you. I think it is important to keep believing in our intrinsic worth and spend time figuring out what gift we have to share with others. We build our energy and talents by serving others in small ways wherever we may be at the moment, with resources, ideas, and talent. Sometimes as a pioneer we have to find new ways to get where we are going, but keeping humility, creativity, and service in mind will remind us of our purpose. We should not let the lack of evident answers prevent us from forging ahead, growing both from the advice of counselors whom we trust to learn from as well as friends with whom we mutually share our burdens.

      • #2888
        Emily McCray
        Participant

        Hello Sarah,

        The way you described a leader as one who forges ahead despite difficulties is so powerful. To be confident in the gifts and abilities God has given us and to use them for His glory is the main goal. Also, I agree with your advice to seek out counselors and friends to share in one’s journey. This allows one to not feel alone in the call or task God has revealed to them. For example, I recall God bringing people into my life at the right time when I needed encouragement also well.

    • #2854
      Gabrielle Nobles
      Participant

      Hebraic leadership follows a Kingdom attitude while acknowledging and appreciating the humanistic realities of the world we live in. A hebraic leader will address a problem from a biblical centered perspective, and examine the history, culture, and society in which the dispute arises.They have a close relationship with God and with their church community, which allows them to develop the aptitude and empathy required to understand groups of people while  keeping their own self-centered views to a minimum.One takes action by engaging wherever they are, both within their local communities and on a worldwide scale.The core of Hebraic leadership resides in being both a leader and an active follower. Hebraic leaders maintain an open mind and humility in knowing that they do not know everything, but are eager to learn holistically in order to address crises in the best way possible.They research individuals from the Bible and use Jesus Christ as a foundation for interacting with both the problem and the people involved. Hebraic leaders recognize the Holy Spirit’s power, position, and function in their lives and allow Him to guide them in all situations.

    • #2856
      Gabrielle Nobles
      Participant

      Hey Chantel,

      You have such a strong perspective of what Hebraic leadership entails, and I absolutely agree with you. I liked how you emphasized that Hebraic leadership “is to be a student of the Near East and to discern beyond the Near East…” In order to be a leader, we must first become followers. That involves taking the time to learn about the Near East’s politics, culture, society, and spirituality before acting. Then we utilize our spiritual journey to make wise judgments about how to respond to various situations.

    • #2857
      Gabrielle Nobles
      Participant

      Hey Chantel,

      You have such a strong perspective of what Hebraic leadership entails, and I absolutely agree with you. I liked how you emphasized that Hebraic leadership “is to be a student of the Near East and to discern beyond the Near East…” In order to be a leader, we must first become followers. That involves taking the time to learn about the Near East’s politics, culture, society, and spirituality before acting. Then we utilize our spiritual journey to make wise judgments about how to respond to various situations.

    • #2858
      Gabrielle Nobles
      Participant

      Hi Renita,

      You have such a insightful and thought provoking point of view. You captured my attention by stating that a Hebraic leader first seek the character and personality of God and understands that God has given us free will and we can guide others, but can’t force them because we all have the freedom of choice. I believe that this is an essential outlook as a Hebraic leader. We should communicate with other and not force our perspective and beliefs onto them. They have the freedom (God has given us) to choose their own course in life. That, to me, exemplifies the duality and respect that Hebraic leaders should have.

    • #2865
      Victoria Franklin
      Participant

      After taking this course, I would define Hebraic leadership as a way of leading with the foundation of a Biblical worldview. To me this means using the moral codes of the Bible and the leaders of the Bible as guides and examples of how to be a leader. This means wielding power not just for the sake of wielding power, but using that authority for good and to glorify God. The Hebraic leader has to accept that politics are a gift from God, so he must wield some coercive power in exercising this gift. In having this Biblical worldview, the Hebraic leader must lead both as an individual and as a member of the larger body of God’s children. This also keeps the Hebraic leader humble; he is not almighty and singular as God is, and him being a member of God’s children reminds him that he is guiding them and himself to God’s Kingdom.

      • #2887
        Emily McCray
        Participant

        Hello Victoria,

        Well done on your post. The insight you got on how the Hebraic leader is one that uses Biblical leaders as guides is spot on. I enjoyed the example the course gave on how Abraham the father of our faith as one who knew when to use words and actions to solve an issue. This is something that all leaders experience. For example, when to talk to an employee about their attitude at work or when to fire someone based on them creating a toxic atmosphere.

    • #2886
      Emily McCray
      Participant

      This course was very insightful. The breakdown of the different worldview maps of Barbaric, Hellenistic, and Hebraic was helpful in understanding the world we live in and people’s perspectives. Each person acts out their life based on core truths and stories they believe about reality. The Hebraic leader is one who understands history and people through the lens of Scripture. First and foremost people are created in the image of God, but also have been given the freedom to live their lives by a God who loves them. Therefore, the Hebraic leader is one who is familiar with human nature and the complicity of evil but also has the ability to engage in heroic acts. The highlight of the course for me was that Christianity is a religion in paradox the twoness of where we find ourselves. This aids any leader who can live and navigate decision-making in that influx of moving parts throughout time. Lastly, this course showed that the Hebraic leader is one who knows where they are going, and to whom they serve. To share in the promotion and promise of the Kingdom of God is the final destination.

    • #2892
      Hannah Paul
      Participant

      Hebraic leadership is leading with a Kingdom mindset. Having that mindset keeps the world, our problems, and any hardships that come our way in the correct perspective. Thus, allowing us to make decisions with clarity and ultimately leading in a way that mimics how Jesus lived which is to serve those around us with both grace and truth. Hebraic leadership means taking the time to understand the history behind the ways in which the world is working. The historical understanding is able to guide our decisions, our conversations, and how we interact with those around us. With this historical knowledge, we can better know the root of Christianity and how we are to live while we are in the “in-between”. Being a Hebraic leader means knowing where you are going and taking responsibility for guiding those who join you along the journey to the Kingdom of God. Navigating this life is meant to be done with community and thus sharing about Jesus to the people you do life with right now is the best place to start.

      • #2896
        Devin Humphreys
        Participant

        Hannah, I appreciated three key things about your contribution here. First, the teleology of this response is on-point – the end is the Kingdom, but the means to understanding the in-between is historical knowledge. Second, I think your conflation of Hebraic leadership with living as Christ lived is a useful conflation to understanding what it is that a Hebraic leader is aspiring to as a model. Third and finally, I appreciated your supplemental contribution on how evangelization fits into the Hebraic worldview. Thank you for this contribution!

    • #2895
      Devin Humphreys
      Participant

      Before taking this course, I considered the Christian’s leadership role in the public sphere to be grounded mainly in the response Jesus gives to the Pharisees who ask whether they should be paying taxes to Rome: “Repay to Caesar what belongs to Caesar and to God what belongs to God” (Mk 12:17, NABRE). While this is certainly a true (if partial) reflection of the Christian’s role in the secular sphere, there are three things this Pathfinder course on Hebraic leadership has emphasized that I will take away from the course:

      1. Hebraic leadership remembers where we came from. While the Acts of the Apostles makes it clear that Jewish ceremony and Jewish law are no longer a mandatory part of the Christian religious tradition, we still need to center ourselves on at least the metaphorical Jerusalem to truly understand the roots of our Christian faith.

      2. Hebraic leadership does not fear using neutral tools for good ends. When Jesus says “my kingdom does not belong to this world”, it is less a rejection of worldly power than a recognition that His *absolute* power is heavenly in nature. We can use worldly power to achieve proximate goods while still keeping our eyes focused on that Kingdom which is to come.

      3. Our sphere of faith and political sphere, while they do not intersect, should (and perhaps even must) inform each other if we are to exemplify Hebraic leadership.

      With these three takeaways in mind, I look forward to continuing my wider involvement with the Pathfinder community!

    • #2905

      The Gospel of Jesus Christ recorded in the first four books of the NT portrayed Jesus as a servant leader, a good shepherd who cares for his sheep (his people), and one whose love led to the sacrificing of His own life for his creation; I believe that’s exactly who/what a Hebraic leadership implies.
      A lot of people have heard about God’s Kingdom that is to come, but they don’t understand how they can form part of this Kingdom. So through my participation in this Pathfinder course, it is now incumbent upon me to share my knowledge with “unbelievers” and those struggling in their faith to reveal God’s purpose concerning them.
      It means that I have a responsibility to share, lead and usher God’s sheep back to his shepherding. A United Methodist Hymnal song says, “A charge to keep I have, and a God to glorify,” that’s what it means to me.

    • #2925
      Nomsa C Mmakola
      Participant

      Hi Devin
      Thanks for pointing out those three things that Pathfinder course on Hebraic Leadership has emphasized.
      Where they came from, They do not fear using neutral tools for good ends, and their sphere of faith and political sphere.
      Hebraic Leadership is about serving others, it’s not about position, privilege, or power.
      Leader is a person of character and competence who influences a community of people to achieve a God honoring calling by means of the power of Christ.

    • #2927
      Oliver Cooper
      Participant

      Hebraic leadership involves leading in a Godly manner. It is guided by the words of God, as such Hebraic leaders tend to follow the examples of Biblical leaders, like Abraham, Moses, Elijah, David, etc.; inorder to lead successfully or achieve their earthly mission.

      Hebraic leaders tend to look into history to study the problems that some great Christian leaders faced and understand how those problems were resolved, so as to walk smoothly through their leadership journey. Hebraic Leadership also involves the acknowledgment and respect for diversity. Hebraic leaders are very much tolerant of others opinions, and cultural and religion beliefs.

      Hebraic leadership is recognizing your responsibility to both God and your neighbor; ensuring that you build and maintain a healthy relationship with God, and that you seek the welfare of your neighbor always.

      Hebraic leadership means embracing politics as a gift from God. A Hebraic leader is one who recognizes the significance of coercive power, especially when it aims at creating order, and enforcing morality.

      • #3021
        Benjamin Comire
        Participant

        Hey, Oliver, thank you for your response! We should truly be guided by our history and the Words of God. The more that I have journeyed on my walk in faith, the more that I see that we must be known by our love and respect for others, which will help us live well and stand out from others who do not do this. Hebraic leaders have unique priorities here on Earth as well look forward to the growth of God’s Kingdom.

    • #2939

      The definition of Hebraic leadership includes several elements that are important to Christians and to humanity in general. The concept changes radically when we understand that the Hebraic worldview not only includes Jewish elements but seeing the world as Jesus saw it. I would even say that thinking with a Hebraic worldview is thinking with the mind of Christ. Therefore, for me Hebraic Leadership means developing the character of a leader such as that of Jesus, having a clear path to follow with a clear vision and mission. Hebraic leadership also implies being brave enough to answer a call and being willing to leave everything to begin the journey that will lead the person to fulfill their objective, just as Christ did by leaving His throne and also as many of the prophets did, like Abraham. The Hebrew leadership must contribute to the establishment of the Kingdom of God and the fulfillment of his purposes.

    • #2999
      Deneisha Hollis
      Participant

      After receiving the in depth information about Hebraic leadership it allowed me to consider my own purpose as a leader and how it intersects with religion. I believe that in many cases Jewish people in Israel have been able to navigate this ideal in their own communities. It means that we should be able to apply our religious beliefs to our social, economical, political, and personal lives. It signifies that we should use our religious text to bring us closer to God and the envisioned kingdom that is planned for us. As a leader we should help guide others to a better understanding of scripture and how we should live our lives following closely to the commandments. As a believer it is my job to continue to use the words written thousands of years ago to help remain a faithful servant. Leadership ties into being a faithful servant of the Lord and I believe that is what Hebraic leadership enables many to do. I feel as if in America we should use these practices to bring people closer together and to not try to separate our leaders from their faith.

    • #3010
      Iliana Owen-Alcala
      Participant

      Hebraic leadership is a type of leadership guided by God, seeking God, and thirsting for God. One can see Hebraic leadership in saints such as Mother Teresa and St. Augustine. Like one of the lessons mentioned, power is only evil when used in an evil way but power yielded and guided by the Holy Spirit is inherently good. Hebraic leadership displays humility, strength, and a love for God. This can and should happen anywhere, from our homes to the federal government. Hebraic leadership has a place in all situations and that is where is belongs. In the work place and in the family, Hebraic leadership must take form for the flourishing of humanity. A mind and a heart for Jesus changes our entire outlook on life in an extraordinary way. Much like on of the lessons said, we should pray to see the world as He does. Striving for the Lord can bare nothing but good things, therefore, our minds should shift from seeking success to saying yes to the Lords call to follow Him and lead with the Kingdom of God in mind.

    • #3020
      Benjamin Comire
      Participant

      Hebraic leadership involves leading like Abraham and Christ. We are willing to leave our homes, travel far, and endure suffering and hardship like Abraham did so that he could see the promised land. We also are not concerned with power, maintaining power, or exerting control over others. In this way, we follow the example of Christ who is King but also came as a servant to man so that we could made free. If we are to embody the faith in our Lord Jesus and lead like Abraham, then we must be ready to face these unconventional aspects of leadership. Additionally, one thing in particular that is unique about Hebraic leadership is that the end goal is not success and happiness in this life, but in the life to come. We work not to reach Heaven, but to grow the Kingdom of God and grow its reach upon the Earth.

    • #3030
      Kara Brackney
      Participant

      Define Hebraic leadership in my own words and what it means to me.
      I can only define what this means to me by first stating that I have been drawn to this part of the world since I was young. Before I came to know Christ as my Savior, I was a practicing Buddist for a bunch of years and from that mindset and understanding I would have said “it must be a past life that I lived in the middle east to try to understand why I am drawn to this land and region”. However, I am not a Buddhist and do not subscribe to the concept of a past life (any longer). So, for me to define what being a Hebraic Leader means to me, I have to start here, in the middle east region (also called the Near East). 

      Geography and Human Geography are topics that are deeply interesting to me and that I spend a great deal of my free time on. I’m either traveling the globe (been to 33 countries and counting) or I am reading, watching, listening to, or talking with people about other parts of the world. I have an adventurous spirit, I’m biblically curious and I travel to places of the lesser known, intentionally. I’ve lived in Asia Minor modern-day Turkey, Jerusalem, Saudi Arabia, and Kuwait, and visited Dubai, Abu Dhabi, and Tbilisi in this region. For 7 years I have lived abroad and worked online. 

      Growing up in the US, I was exposed to the church’s “American style”. I didn’t like being forced to attend church, but that was my personal experience in my family. I know, my parents were doing the best they could to “raise their children in the church”. What I saw when I attended seemed shallow in nature. Much more about (what people were wearing at church/gossiping after church over coffee and cookies and which area people lived in). That was my whole take on church. I tuned it out as a kid and just sat in my seat on a pew and doodled on the donation envelopes. I did enjoy the singing, that part was nice. I also remember seeing a “New Testament” bible meaning it only had the NT but not the OT in it. Looking back now, I can’t even understand why a copy was printed. Why would someone intentionally split up the OT and the NT?

      That is where I am with the church in the US, it seems to be about (only the NT, big buildings or campuses, rock songs with Christian lyrics, skinny jeans, coffee in church, come as you are even if you’re wearing a T-shirt). I will admit, I’m torn between wanting to live in Jerusalem, covering my head with a scarf, wearing long modest dresses, observing Shabbat weekly with my husband, and inviting the neighbors over (Believers and non Believers). But, I also love to listen to and sing my Hillsong and Chris Tomlin worship music. Can I have both?
      That’s a rhetorical question. 

      As a person who loves to travel and has chosen to live in the middle east, I am also a Christian who wants to live in the same ancient lands where my Savior Yeshua lived. The more I study the OT and spend time here, the more I feel completion in my faith and understanding of the early Christians. The Way “Hodos” is how I “try” to live my life. I don’t watch TV, I stopped consuming anything from Hollywood more than 6 years ago. I am very mindful of what I “consume” of this world including friends (in real-life) and online, social media, YT, music, and all of pop culture. Because I was so consumed by all of that when I was younger and a non-believer, I am hyper-vigilant about my consumption.

      In conclusion, what it means to be a Hebraic Leader in our modern-tech world in 2022 is to quite literally walk the talk. Pray, fast, be humble, love my neighbor, forgive anyone who hurt me, give to the needy, and live each day as holy as I can. Know that I am a sinner and will fail but I will strive towards being holy and always, always keep my eyes on Jesus first. People ask me what drew my husband (who was born in Asia Minor) and me together and I say “it’s the way he loves Jesus first. His eyes are always on Jesus and I’ve never met a man who prays to God the way he does”. He is a sinner who was forgiven by grace and paid in full by Jesus’ blood. We are both living our days here on earth waiting to return to heaven- to enter the Kingdom. Our daily life is filled with prayer, our responsibilities, family, and friends. We wait patiently for the Lord to let us go home- to the Kingdom of God keeping our eyes on Jesus Christ Yeshua Hamasiach. 

    • #1966
      Clay Shackelford
      Participant

      Hey Thomas! I love your perspective. I agree that as followers of Jesus we are called to love all people of all nations. This is part of the Kingdom of Heaven we are invited to! I also agree that this Hebraic leadership is so needed in our world as the Kingdom of Heaven is formed on this Earth. May we be part of this as well!

    • #2024
      Mary Schulten
      Participant

      Thank you for your insight, Thomas! I love your point about the importance of prayer and fasting. Viewing it through a Hebraic worldview lens completely reshapes something that would otherwise be drab. The Hebraic worldview brings purpose to prayer and fasting, calling us to use those tools to recharge and gain moral clarity, just as the prophets did. That’s the mark of a true Hebraic leader, one who knows that he doesn’t have to reinvent the wheel, but just look to scripture for eternal wisdom.

    • #2236
      Steve Allen
      Participant

      Hey Thomas, I appreciate that you highlight the importance of the Kingdom, and the eschatological implications of living in light of the coming Kingdom, and under the headship of our King.I benefited from hearing how Dr. Robert taught that Jesus’ conception of leading in God’s Kingdom presupposed the “staight and narrow” way, and Himself as the leader and embodiment of that Way.You did a good job of discussing what it means to lead like our Leader, Jesus, with universal love for our neighbors, and their good, as well out of the humility of a servant leader.

    • #1967
      Clay Shackelford
      Participant

      Esther! I agree so much with your response! As followers of Jesus, we should be proactive and not passive. Whether it’s in the Near East, or in our neighborhood we should be an example of how to live in peace with other. In particular, this course stood out in how it defined plurality. I believe that Christians should work to live in peace with all faiths while also not ignoring the call to establish Jesus’s kingdom here on Earth.

    • #2016
      Cristina Varela
      Participant

      Hello Alex,

      Thank you for sharing your perspective. I love that you touched upon humility in your response. I believe our whole worldview and the actions that stem from it are completely transformed when we keep in mind that our lives are not our own. It is truly necessary for God to increase and us to decrease to serve as a Hebraic leader in these times. Pride is favored in secular society but we must choose to go against that tide.

    • #2034
      William Comer
      Participant

      Hi Alex

      Great insight on the importance of humility in the life of a Hebraic leader. Humility is an often-forgotten component of leadership that is crucial to being a truly effective and good leader. Often those in leadership are tempted to stray from their calling to serve God by prioritizing title or position over calling. By following the example of Hebraic leadership, we can better focus on remaining humble and leading others out of a place of humility rather than pride.

    • #2158
      Kyle Hansen
      Participant

      Alex, I love the point you make about not trying to be the hero of our story, but rather being humble and trying to understand out part it God’s ultimate story. A professor told me several times when facing issues, “it’s not about you”, and bringing it back to spiritual realities. You mention being steward over what God has given us, talking about our abilities over the earth, and the control we have to lay down our lives. I think to lead, we have to have a perspective that while we are taking people somewhere, the leader is not the end goal of life, God is. I think God’s judgment after death, is one of the greatest examples of his control, and if we trust Jesus’ grace, we can have more peace about what we might face here, and more confidence that if he calls us to walk down a road, we will see him in the end not matter what.

    • #2196
      John Ryan Rodriguez
      Participant

      I really enjoyed your perception of what Hebraic Leadership means. Stewardship is definitely a large component of what the Judeo-Christian faiths teach other followers. As Christians, we are immediately introduced to stewardship with Adam in the Garden of Eden. This idea is carried through the rest of the scripture when Jesus entrusts his mother with his disciples while on the cross, and through Paul’s writings to his fellow and future brethren of the faith. Thanks for sharing!

    • #2058
      Zack Jones
      Participant

      Hi Courtney,

      I really appreciate your point: Christians who lead, whether in their families, in their neighborhoods, or in organizations, must be able to have a good understanding of God’s work in the past and what God is working toward. They understand where they are in the arc of redemptive history and look forward to the day when God consummates all things and brings in the New Heavens and the New Earth. But until that day comes, Hebraic Christians act with self-control, unlike the world, and point others to what lies ahead.

    • #2606
      Chantel Barnard
      Participant

      Hi Courtney

      Truly appreciate your unique voice on defining Hebraic Leadership and what it means to you. I enjoyed your reflection on time, it focused on past and future, I am curious about the present. It is truly great how succinctly you put down what you learned and what Hebraic leadership means to you. Also very refreshing how you point out discipline of the Hebraic Leader.

    • #2653
      Nathan Alvarez
      Participant

      Hi Courtney,
      I really resonate with your emphasis on discipline as it relates to Hebraic leadership. I think we have a tendency to see leaders as self-serving in many ways, hence modern dissatisfaction with political figures. But you’re exactly correct that leaders are those that take on the burden of facilitating justice, emphasizing their role as a servant and not a tyrant.

    • #2157
      Kyle Hansen
      Participant

      Connie, I really appreciate how you say, respond to others in a God-fearing way. It brings into focus that our aim should be to always honor and fear God in our interactions with others, rather than other goals or attitudes that we might bring to the table. I also like the way you characterize how many are conflict adverse. If people value not engaging in conflict more than they value some things like, truth, freedom, and love, then they could easily make the wrong decisions in responding to troubling issues.

    • #2940

      Connie, I agree on the importance of remembering contexts in terms of locations since this allows us to have a complete picture of historical events that have affected humanity. Regarding culture and influences, I consider it important to identify their origins, since many of them are based on roots that could be the origin of many current conflicts. Such is the case of the Arab-Israeli conflict, which originated in the time of Abraham due to the custom in which the wife could offer her servant to her husband to procreate. However, at that time maybe no one thought that many of Israel’s enemies would descend from Ishmael.

    • #2160
      Katelyn Hernandez
      Participant

      Hi Jaqueline,
      I appreciate how you started by saying it means you aren’t Jewish. Just like how this lesson started- touching on the clear delineation. I agree and like how you said it sees it in linear, when we grew up learning about history in school the most common depiction was a timeline- so I think that’s a great way to break things down. Although we may not know which notch we are at on the timeline we are still living going in the same direction and with the same history.

    • #2161
      Katelyn Hernandez
      Participant

      Hello Axel,
      I appreciate that your response touches on the fallen nature of man. Man’s fall is such an essential element to our salvation history and our path with Christ. I think it also emphasizes’ God’s intent in granting us free will. I think that a biblical style of leadership in a modern-day world is something we all can strive for. As we live in exile and in a broken world, what do you think are ways we can work towards healing apart from evangelism?

    • #2254
      Olivia Layne
      Participant

      Elise! I really appreciate the way that you describe a Hebraic leader’s responsibility both “celestially and temporally.” This is something that I think is widely neglected in most modern evangelical churches. It is so common to prioritize heaven and our own personal lives that we neglect to see how we can impact others, and you touched on that when you spoke about community and humility starting in the home. Really enjoyed reading what you had to say!

    • #2451
      Denise DeVatt
      Participant

      Elise,
      I really like when you said “knowing when to seek advice from others and when to admit you’re wrong.” I have to admit that this is something I am learning, and I think we all are as well. Nobody is born a perfect leader but instead, learns through prayer and their own humility how to become one. I also agree with what you said about leadership beginning at home. I want to take that a step further and say that leadership begin with oneself. The way we treat and talk to ourselves ultimately shows in how we lead others as well, and if we put ourselves down, we are going to put others down as well. Thanks for that new perspective!

    • #2272
      Gia Chacon
      Participant

      Hi Ashley, great definition here. I especially love the Scripture you quoted. I believe all the aspects of a Hebraic Leader are rooted in humility. How can we trust God, accept our calling, love our neighbor, etc, if we don’t first have true humility? Our humility and love for God will help us stay focused amidst all the distractions.

      Blessings!

    • #2607
      Chantel Barnard
      Participant

      Hi Ashley

      What really stood out for me in Your post, was the fact that you stated that Hebraic leaders remain mission-focused, I truly appreciate this reminder, it makes me remember John 15, how God asks us to remain in Him, knowing that we cannot bear fruit unless we abide in Him. So here I am convinced that remaining mission-focused will let each Hebraic Leader reach their destination, because without remaining in God it is impossible to do anything. The mission is walking the way, the way is Jesus, it is abiding in the path, that we become one with the Son and the Father, that we are able to do, that we are pruned and that we bear fruit. That we accomplish the mission and reach the destination.

    • #2893
      Hannah Paul
      Participant

      Hi Nadia!

      Thank you for sharing your thoughts on this topic. I agree that our ultimate goal is what sets us apart. It is so important to be mindful of the Kingdom of God in our every day lives because, like you said, it distinguishes us between the world. If we lead and act the same way as the world does why would anyone want to hear what we have to say about Jesus? I really appreciated your takeaways. God bless!

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